Question about 1988 Volkswagen Jetta

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Brake has no pressure and brake fluid does not come out of the valve when you try and pump the air out

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Time for a new master cylinder

Posted on Sep 14, 2010

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We have replace my clutch in 2012 cascadia and we have tried to bleed the air out of line. We can't get any pressure on the clutch pedal and it will stay down on the floor. We can put it in gear unless the...


The clutch system in your vehicle most likely works very similar to your brake system. In most cases, it may even use brake fluid as its working fluid. If you drive a classic car or truck you may have a mechanical clutch meaning it operates by a system of levers, pivot points and connecting rods to translate the movement of the clutch pedal into movement of your clutch pressure plate releasing the clutch. New cars use hydraulic clutch systems because they are much simpler to install, take up less space and do not require adjustment as your clutch wears down.
If you have replaced the clutch slave or master cylinder, the lines, or simply changed the fluid, you need to do an adequate job removing the air from the system before your clutch will work properly. This procedure is called "bleeding" your clutch system by most mechanics and is important because air in a hydraulic system will cause it to malfunction. As you press the clutch pedal, the master cylinder forces hydraulic fluid, in this case brake fluid, down through the line into the slave cylinder. The pressure of this fluid will cause the slave cylinder to activate, pushing your clutch fork and disengaging your clutch. If there is air in the system, that air bubble can compress. This compressing air bubble will absorb much of the fluid being sent from the master cylinder to the slave cylinder keeping the slave cylinder from actuating as far as it should, or even at all. If the slave cylinder does not travel as far as it should, your clutch will not fully disengage making it difficult to shift your transmission, especially into 1st gear from a stop.
To remove the air from your clutch system you need to push or pull the air down through the fluid line to the bleeder valve on the slave cylinder. To keep things clean you should attach a tube to the nipple on the bleeder valve. If you use a clear tube it can be easy to see when all the air has exited the system. The easiest way to bleed the clutch is to use a vacuum pump to pull the fluid and air out of the system while keeping the clutch fluid reservoir topped off. Continue pumping fluid from the bleeder valve until you no longer see air bubbles in the fluid. If you do not have a vacuum pump, you can do this manually with a friend.
With the bleeder valve closed, have your helper depress the clutch pedal as far as they can. Open the bleeder valve and allow the fluid to run out until it slows down, while your friend maintains pressure on the clutch pedal. When the fluid flow slows, while your Helper still has pressure on the clutch pedal, close the bleeder valve. Let the clutch pedal back up and repeat the process. Continue this process until no more air bubbles are seen exiting the bleeder valve. Your helper should feel the pedal (stiffen up) as you complete this process as air is easier to compress than the clutch plate release springs.
When you have completed this procedure make sure the bleeder valve is tightly closed, and go for a test drive!

Aug 19, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I just replace the power steering pump and gear box on 98 ram 1500 gas engine. When I apply brakes to turn corner, I lose power steering. Help please!


Unless you have a power steering assisted brake booster more common with a diesel, you may have a new pump issue like the flow control valve in the pump or air in the system yet, check for air bubbles or a milky looking fluid and the correct fluid. Try in a parking lot out of the way of traffic to put in neutral while moving,rev the motor slightly and brake as you would when the PS assist stops,by revving the motor just off idle this will increase the PS pressure it should act normal if it's a flow control issue and if the pump is capable of producing the correct pressure.

Aug 21, 2016 | 1998 Dodge Ram

1 Answer

2000 electraglide, trying to bleed brakes on the rear master cylinder. I take the cap off master cylinder put a hose on bleeder valve, pump up break and hold it down crack the valve and nothing comes out....


does the pedal have pressure then go down after valve is cracked? With a hose on the nipple to a bottle to catch the fluid, press rear brake pedal down. Don\'t pump the brakes. Crack the bleeder valve while continuing to press down on the pedal. Once the pedal reaches the limit of its travel close the valve. Once the valve is closed; and not before; release the pedal and let it return to its at rest position. Repeat this process until you have good pedal without the need to pump, good clean fluid is coming out the valve, and no air is in the fluid coming out the valve. Be sure not to let the fluid in reservoir get too low or you will suck in air and need to start over and don\'t press the pedal too quickly or you can shoot a stream of brake fluid out the reservoir.

In very extreme cases, if you have lost prime in the master cylinder, it may be necessary to bleed the master cylinder first. THIS IS A LAST RESORT. Remove the brake line from the master cylinder. Try to limit the loss of fluid from the brake line to bare minimum. Thread a nipple into the master cylinder. Run a hose from the nipple into the reservoir. Be sure the hose stays submerged in the fluid in the reservoir and pump the brake until no bubbles come out the hose. Remove the nipple and reinstall the brake line. Slowly press down the brake pedal while tightening the line to minimize the air bubble in the brake line. Again be sure not to release the pedal until the line is tight. Then proceed to bleed the brakes as you normally would. Do not pump the brakes up. Just press the pedal down, crack the valve, close the valve, release the pedal, repeat.

Aug 24, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Proper way to bleed brake lines and system


First check your level in the brake fluid reservoir. If full, then you will need to pull off one tire at a time to bleed the brakes. There will be a bleeder valve on each caliper. Open the valve and pump the brakes until hard and hold, to get air out of the system. Then close the valve. I usually use a clear tube attached to the valve so that I can make sure I got all the air out of the line. Once air is gone, do the other side. Make sure to keep brake fluid full in reservoir to prevent air from reentering the brake lines.

Sep 09, 2012 | 2000 Oldsmobile Intrigue

2 Answers

How do I bleed the brakes?


well on vehicles with ABS you have to start at the furthest brake location, so the order in which to follow is Passenger rear, driver rear, passenger front, driver front. Really good investment to buy a one person bleeding tool, but if you have a friend with an hour to spare just get them to pump the brakes 3 times and than hold to the floor while you open the bleeder valve located on your calipers/drums, make sure they hold down until you open the valve for 1 sec to release pressure and hopefully all the nasty air, than they can release and just keep going till there is a steady stream of fluid, hope this helps.

Sep 06, 2011 | 2004 Ford Escape

1 Answer

How to bleed brakes on a 1992 Chevy Caprice. Specifically the rear drums


start from the fartherest place from brake master cylinder, that will be the rear passenger side wheel. it takes two people to bleed brakes. you will find the bleeder valve screws at the top of inside of the rear drums on both rear wheels, have someone pump the brakes up, will take at least 4 pumps of brake pedal, at 4th pump keep pressure on pedal while you break loose the bleeder valve on the rear wheel, fluid will come out and brake pedal will go down to floor, keep pressure on brake pedal until you've tightened the bleeder screw back [note] you'll only have to back the bleeder valve out about a half turn until you see the fluid come out. after you've done the rear brakes add brake fluid to the master cylinder as it will be low. then go to the front passeger side and you will find the bleeder screw on the brake caliper. repeat the same proceedure as back. remember that pressure on the pedal is a must until you've tightened those bleeder valve screws back or else it will **** air into the brake system. suggest that you bleed all 4 wheels not just the back. after you've bled the front make sure you add more brake fluid back to the master cylinder, it will be low again. hope this helps and thank you for choosing fixya.com

Nov 21, 2010 | 1992 Chevrolet Caprice

2 Answers

The tube for my brakes going from the caliper to the inside of the car burst. i went to replace them and it did not help my breaks are still not working. how do you properly bleed the brakes on a 2003 gmc...


Bleeding brakes can be very frustrating.There are two ways you can do them 1 gravity feed;this means that you undo the bleeder screw on the caliper or the wheel cylinder and let the brake fluid flow until all air is removed from the system or 2 suction bleed; this involves going to your auto supply store and buying a small hand held pump that creates a suction which in turn,once connected over the bleeder screw,allows you to pull brake fluid and the air out of the system.If you have a friend to help you have them depress the brake pedal until it reaches the floor while you loosen the bleeder screw and discharge the air/fluid.Tighten the screw before the brake pedal is released,release the pedal and repeat.Keep checking the master cylinder and do not let the fluid run low.Don't pump the pedal repeatedly,brake fluid is hydroscopic,which means it can absorb air directly into itself.Slowly and firmly does it until you have purged all the air.You will know when it is all gone because hard pedal will come back.Good Luck

Nov 02, 2010 | 2003 GMC Sonoma Extended Cab

1 Answer

Trying to bleed brake line, no success with pumping brakes. Two people , one pumping brakes the other bleeding. Not getting air or fluid.


It sounds like you may not be doing the process corectly. If you are, then I apologize. Make certain that the bleeder valve is in the closed position. Have another person pump the break peddle much in the same sequence as CPR (if that helps). Upon your command, the other person needs to apply steady pressure to the brake peddle until you tell him to release, and not before. While he is applying pressure, you, open the bleeder valve. At that time, the peddle should go to the flow. Close the bleeder valve BEFORE you tell him to release the pressure. Repeat the process until all four brake calipers have been bled, (meaning that you get a stream of fluid with no air bubbles.Periodically throughout the process, it is important to make certain that you have plenty of fluid in the reservoir. That should do it. If not, I'd like to know. Good luck.

Sep 27, 2010 | 1987 Chevrolet El Camino

1 Answer

I'm a mid-age woman w/a 94 DeVille that I want to change the brake fluid myself. How do I do that? Thank you!


BRAKE SYSTEM BLEEDING Diagonal Split System MASTER CYLINDER
  1. Refill the master cylinder reservoir.
  2. Push the plunger several times to force fluid into the piston.
  3. Continue pumping the plunger until the fluid is free of the air bubbles.
  4. Plug the outlet ports and install the master cylinder.
COMPLETE SYSTEM
  1. Fill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid. Check the level often during the procedure.
  2. Starting with the right rear wheel, remove the protective cap from the bleeder, if equipped, and place where it will not be lost. Clean the bleed screw. When bleeding the brakes, keep face away from the brake area. Spewing fluid may cause facial and/or visual damage. Do not allow brake fluid to spill on the vehicle's finish; it will remove the paint.
  3. If the system is empty, the most efficient way to get fluid down to the wheel is to loosen the bleeder about 1?2 - 3?4 turn, place a finger firmly over the bleeder and have a helper pump the brakes slowly until fluid comes out the bleeder. Once fluid is at the bleeder, close it before the pedal is released inside the vehicle. NOTE: If the pedal is pumped rapidly, the fluid will churn and create small air bubbles, which are difficult to remove from the system. These air bubbles will eventually congregate resulting in a spongy pedal.
  4. Once fluid has been pumped to the caliper or wheel cylinder, open the bleed screw again, have the helper press the brake pedal to the floor, lock the bleeder and have the helper slowly release the pedal. Wait 15 seconds and repeat the procedure (including the 15 second wait) until no more air comes out of the bleeder upon application of the brake pedal. Remember to close the bleeder before the pedal is released inside the vehicle each time the bleeder is opened. If not, air will be induced into the system.
  5. If a helper is not available, connect a small hose to the bleeder, place the end in a container of brake fluid and proceed to pump the pedal from inside the vehicle until no more air comes out the bleeder. The hose will prevent air from entering the system.
  6. Repeat the procedure on remaining wheel cylinders in order:
    1. Step 1: Left front
    2. Step 2: Left rear
    3. Step 3: Right front
  7. Hydraulic brake systems must be totally flushed if the fluid becomes contaminated with water, dirt or other corrosive chemicals. To flush, bleed the entire system until all fluid has been replaced with the correct type of new fluid.
  8. Install the bleeder cap(s) on the bleeder to keep dirt out. Always road test the vehicle after brake work of any kind is done.
Teves® Anti-lock Brake System FRONT BRAKES
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF throughout this procedure.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Remove the reservoir cap. Check and/or refill the master cylinder reservoir.
  4. Using the bleeder adapter tool, install it onto the fluid reservoir.
  5. Attach a diaphragm type pressure bleeder to the adapter and charge the bleeder to 20 psi.
  6. Using a transparent vinyl tube, connect it to either front wheel caliper and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  7. Open the bleeder valve 1?2 - 3?4 turn and purge the caliper until bubble free fluid flows from the hose.
  8. Tighten the bleeder screw and remove the bleeder equipment.
  9. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the pump to charge the accumulator.
  10. After bleeding, inspect the pedal for sponginess and the brake warning light for unbalanced pressure; if either of the conditions exist, repeat the bleeding procedure.
REAR BRAKES
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Check and/or refill the master cylinder reservoir.
  4. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the system to charge. NOTE: The pump will turn OFF when the system is charged.
  5. Using a transparent vinyl tube, connect it to a rear wheel bleeder valve and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  6. Open the bleeder valve 1?2 - 3?4 turn and slightly depress the brake pedal for at least 10 seconds or until air is removed from the brake system. Close the bleeder valve. NOTE: It is a good idea to check the fluid level several times during the bleeding operation. Remember, depressurize the system before checking the reservoir fluid.
  7. Repeat the bleeding procedure for the other rear wheel.
  8. After bleeding, inspect the pedal for sponginess and the brake warning light for unbalanced pressure; if either of the conditions exist, repeat the bleeding procedure.
Bosch® III Anti-lock Brake System
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Check and/or refill the reservoir to the full mark.
  4. Using a transparent vinyl hose, connect it to a pump bleeder screw and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  5. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  6. Move the transparent vinyl hose to the hydraulic unit bleeder screw. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  7. Disconnect the bleeder hose.
  8. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the hydraulic unit to charge; the pump should turn OFF after 30 seconds.
Bosch® 2U Anti-lock Brake System
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Check and/or refill the reservoir to the full mark.
  4. Using a transparent vinyl hose, connect it to a pump bleeder screw and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  5. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  6. Move the transparent vinyl hose to the hydraulic unit bleeder screw. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  7. Disconnect the bleeder hose.
  8. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the hydraulic unit to charge; the pump should turn OFF after 30 seconds.
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Sep 02, 2010 | 1994 Cadillac DeVille

2 Answers

How to bleed the brakes on a1999 chevrolet venture van instaslled new brake pads on front tired to bleed brake pedal all the way up when van not running - goes to floor when van is running


Start with brake in the rear that is the farthest away from the master cylinder ( if your master cylinder is on drivers side start with passenger rear,pump up brake pedal until hard have someone else open bleeder valve until air or fluid squirts out,while holding brake pressure even if goes to the floor dont release pedal until bleeder valve is tightened or you will **** air back into the line,do this several times making sure you get a full stream of brake fluid and no air,continue to other rear wheel and then proceed to front wheel furthest from master cylinderand then final wheel. if you still don't have brakes change master cylinder and bleed all brakes again.

Jul 05, 2010 | 2000 Chevrolet Venture

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