Question about 1970 Oldsmobile 442

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I am replacing the seal, rotors ,bearings, brake pads, calipers are ok, However im having trouble putting back the rotor and the new bearing back in it goes in fine but doesnt go in all the way perhaps 1/4 inch from being in place. It fit just fine. except wont go in all the way. Thank you in advance. Nelson

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  • 142 Answers

Making sure the seal & bearing that you got were
correct. I would make sure the parts are correct first.
Then make sure the spindle shaft is not damaged.
If all parts are correct, and there is nothing wrong
with spindle shaft. make sure by sliding bearing all
the way on the shaft. If you replaced the bearing race
make sure they are fully seated in the rotor.

Posted on Sep 12, 2010

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1997 ford f150 2wd, anti lock rear. I replaced brake pads on both frt. Now one side is dragging. Wheel bearings seem to be ok - no slack. Would my rotor be warped, causing the heat up? Also - all I seem to...


the brake drag could be caused by a brake caliper sticking and not releasing, which means replace both calipers and bleed system, as usually when one goes bad the other is not far behind. another thing is if a brake flex hose has collapsed internally it won`t allow the caliper to be released completely. the name for the bearing is called inner wheel bearing. as far as the rotors if they haven`t been changed or turned and have heated up enough that you could smell brake material then change them in pairs.

Aug 05, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

WHy dose my brake pedal push back and make a grinding noise


Look through the openings in your front wheels and look at the front rotors-are they gouged up? You are probably running metal-to-metal, pads to rotors.
Chances are real good your rotors will have to be replaced along with new pads, but if you catch it early enough you might be able to have them machined, although nowadays that is hardly easy to get done and the savings usually is not as significant as it once was.

May 23, 2011 | 1995 Pontiac Bonneville

1 Answer

Need to replace right front wheel bearing


Remove the wheel and tire ***'y. remove the brake caliper to get it out of your way, then take the dust cap off the rotor where you'l find a nut with acover and a cotterpin. remove the cotter pin, nut coverand loosen the nut, the rotor will come off. the outer bearing will immediately come out if ti's not buried into the race. Remove the inner bearing by knocking out the which you'll need to replace as well. actually to do the job right , replace both races, bearings and the seals. the races and bearings have to wear together and using new bearings on old races is just asking for trouble soon, as they do not wear together like they should. Pack bearings with new grease, install the new races, put some extra grease inside the rotor so the bearings and races will have plenty of lube, install the inner bearing then the seal, put the rotor on the spindle, install the outer bearing nuut, tighten the outer nut just until the rotor rotates one to two revolutions when spinning freehand andinstall the nut cover and the cotter pin, caliper wheel and tire, you're finished, good luck.

Oct 19, 2010 | 1992 Lexus Ls 400

2 Answers

Wondering if a novice can replace rotors and brake pads on a 2007 chevrolet suburban ltz? Do u have to do the wheel bearings also during rotor removal? Any special tools that might need to be purchased?


A novice can replace brake pads, but the rotors may be more difficult if they are not floating.
Check with the parts store to see if they are floating. If they are, you are in luck and can change the rotor once the calipers are off.


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Often the front wheel hub bearing assembly for driven and nondriven wheels is actually two tapered bearings facing each other.
f40-20.gif Exploded view of a typical front wheel bearing assembly for a FWD vehicle. Courtesy of DaimlerChrysler Corporation Each of the bearings rides in its own race. Some front wheel bearings are sealed units and are lubricated for life. They are replaced and serviced as an assembly. Others are serviceable and require periodic lubrication and adjustment.
Except when making slight adjustments to the bearings, the bearing assembly must be removed for all service work.
  • This is done with the vehicle on lifts and the wheel assembly removed.
  • In the center of the hub there is a dust (grease) cap.
  • Using slip-joint pliers or a special dust cap removal tool, wiggle the cap out of its recess in the hub.
f40-21.jpg A special tool for removing a dust cap. If one is not available use slip-joint pliers.
  • Now remove the cotter pin and nut lock from the end of the spindle.
  • Loosen the spindle nut while supporting the brake assembly and hub.
  • On many vehicles you will need to remove the brake caliper to remove the brake disc and hub.
  • Once the hub is free to come off the spindle, remove the spindle nut and the washer behind the nut.
  • Move the hub slightly forward, then push it back. This should free the outer bearing so you can remove it.
  • Now remove the hub assembly. A grease seal located on the back of the hub normally keeps the inner bearing from falling out when the hub is removed.
  • To remove the bearing assembly, the grease must be removed first. In most cases, all you need to do to remove the seal is pry and pop it out of the hub.
  • The inner bearing should then fall out.
  • Keep the outer bearing and inner bearing separated if you plan on reusing them.
  • Wipe the bearings and races or use brake parts cleaner to clean them.
  • While doing this, pay close attention to the condition and movement of the bearings. The bearings need to rotate smoothly.
  • Also visually inspect the bearings and races after they have been cleaned. any noticeable damage means they should be replaced.
  • Also inspect the spindle. If it is damaged or excessively worn, the steering knuckle assembly should be replaced.
  • Whenever a bearing is replaced, its race must also be replaced.
  • Races are pressed in and out of the hub. Typically the old race can be driven out with a large drift and a hammer. Once the race has been removed, wipe all grease from the inside of the hub.
  • The new race should be installed with the proper driver.
  • During assembly, the bearings and hub assembly must be thoroughly and carefully lubricated.
  • Care must be taken not to get grease on the brake disc or on any part that will directly contact the disc.
  • Always use the recommended grease on this assembly. The grease must be able to withstand much heat and friction. If the wrong grease is used, it may not offer the correct protection or it may liquefy from the heat and leak out of the seals.
  • The bearings should be packed with grease. It is important that the grease is forced into and around all of the rollers in the bearing. Merely coating the outside of the bearing with grease will not do the job.
  • A bearing packer does the best job at packing in the grease. If one is not available, force grease into the bearing with your hand. Install the greased inner bearing into the hub.
  • Install a new grease seal into the hub.
  • To avoid damaging the seal, use the correct size driver to press the seal into the hub.
  • Lubricate the spindle, then slip the hub over the spindle. Install the outer bearing, washer, and lock nut.
  • The lock nut should be adjusted to the exact specifications given in the service manual.
  • Often it is tightened until the hub cannot rotate, then it is loosened about one-half turn before it is set to the specified freeplay. The initial tightening seats the bearings into their races.
  • Once the lock nut is tightened, install the nut lock and use a new cotter pin to retain the lock.
  • The adjustment of the bearings can be checked with a dial indicator.
f40-22.gif Wheel bearing adjustments can be checked with a dial indicator. Reprinted with permission.
  • Mount the base of the indicator as close as possible to the center of the hub.
  • Locate the tip of the indicator's plunger on the tip of the spindle.
  • Set the indicator to zero.
  • Firmly grasp the brake disc and move it in and out.
  • The total movement shown on the indicator is the amount of freeplay at the bearing.
  • Compare your reading to the specifications and make adjustments as necessary.
WARNING Throughout this entire process, your hands will have grease on them. Be very careful not to touch the brake assembly with your greasy hands. Clean them before handling the brake parts or use a clean rag to hold the brake assembly.
  • The front bearing arrangement often found on FWD and 4WD vehicles is often nonserviceable.
  • These bearings are pressed in and out of the hub to be replaced. To do this, the axle or half shaft is removed, as is the steering knuckle and hub assembly.
  • The bearings may be sealed and require no additional lubrication or they may need to be packed with grease when they are reassembled. In most cases, the bearings are not adjusted.
  • A heavily torqued axle nut is used to hold the assembly in place on the axle.
  • This nut is typically replaced after it has been removed and is staked in place after it is tightened.

Oct 15, 2010 | Chevrolet Suburban Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to remove front rotor


remove front wheel, undo the retaining bolts from the brake caliper and remove it, do not undo the fluid line that runs to the caliper or you will have to bleed the brakes, just tie the caliper up under the guard somewhere
remove the metal cap from the middle of the rotor, remove the retaining pin from the nut and remove the wheel bearing from the stub axle, the rotor should now be free to remove from the car.
fit the new rotor, grease the bearings if required and tighten to remove any slop in the rotor, once that is done you can put the retaining pin back in place.
You may have to press the caliper piston in to get enough clearance to fit the brake pads over the new rotor, this can be done with a "G" clamp, just remove the outer pad, place a small piece of wood over the face of the inner pad where the "G" clamp is going to sit to protect the pad and wind the clamp to compress the piston, replace the outer pad and fit back into the caliper before you put the caliper over the rotor and bolt it on
hope this helps

Jul 08, 2010 | 1998 Jaguar XJ8L

1 Answer

How do I get the front rotors off to replace new ones.


jack up.take wheels off.turn steering right on caliper undo bracket slide bolt 2 of them them undo caliper bracket 2 more bolts move caliper and hang to left take take rotor off.thats for 4wheel drive.2 wheel with bearing.take bearing cap off take out cotter pin and lock washer off.pull rotor.suggestion new wheel bearings.and brakes.ps old school trick take fluid cap off.put flat head between pad n rotor pry back before taking caliper to recess the calipr.then remove brakes.then big water pump pliers and recess caliper fully.it will over flow the resovoir.no biggy brake cleaner off this will help.sometime bleeder valves brake off then cause you more aggrivation like buying new calipers.pss make sure yuo grease new bearings well and also caliper slides.hope this helps

Nov 25, 2009 | Mazda B2200 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How do you replace the front rotors on an 1999 Chevy express van 1500?


REMEMBER TO REPLACE THE PADS AS WELL, NO USED PADS ON NEW ROTORS.

Raise the vehicle and support on jack stands. Remove the wheels. Place the drip pan under the caliper. Loosen the 10 mm bleeder screw on the top of the caliper.
  • Step 2 Spread the brake pads apart with the common screwdriver. Place the screwdriver in the slot in the center of the caliper where the pads can be seen. With the nose of the screwdriver, pry between the rotor and the pad and pull the caliper outward toward you. The piston is being depressed into its housing as the caliper is pulled out. When the caliper comes to its limit outward, push the caliper back away from you and insert the screwdriver into the inside pad between the pad and the rotor. Once again pull the screwdriver toward you until the caliper piston is compressed into its bore.
  • Step 3 Tighten the 10 mm bleeder screw. Remove the caliper and support it where it is not hanging on the brake hose. Letting the caliper hang on the brake hose will damage the hose and cause brake failure.
  • Step 4 Remove the caliper support if it interferes with the removal of the rotor. Some vehicles don't require the removal of the support. Remove the rotor by pulling it off. If it is stuck, hit it with a hammer a few times between the studs.
  • Step 5 Install the caliper support and caliper in the reverse order they were taken off. Install the wheels and let the vehicle down. Check the brake fluid and fill as necessary to the proper level.
  • Step 6 Start the vehicle and pump the brakes very slowly until you have a high pedal. Remember that by expanding the calipers they have to re-adjust. You will not have any braking when you first start the car. Do not try to move the car until you have pumped the brake pedal sufficiently to feel a firm pedal.
    Rear-Wheel-Drive Vehicles
  • Step 1 Raise the vehicle and support on jack stands. Remove the wheels. Place the drip pan under the caliper. Loosen the 10 mm bleeder screw on the top of the caliper.
  • Step 2 Spread the brake pads apart with the common screwdriver. Place the screwdriver in the slot in the center of the caliper where the pads can be seen. With the nose of the screwdriver, pry between the rotor and the pad and pull the caliper outward toward you. The piston is being depressed into its housing as the caliper is pulled out. When the caliper comes to its limit outward, push the caliper back away from you and insert the screwdriver into the inside pad between the pad and the rotor. Once again, pull the screwdriver toward you until the caliper piston is compressed into its bore.
  • Step 3 Tighten the 10 mm bleeder screw. Remove the caliper and support it where it is not hanging on the brake hose. Letting the caliper hang on the brake hose will damage the hose and cause brake failure.
  • Step 4 Remove the bearing cap in the center of the rotor. Remove the cotter pin. Remove the large nut that retains the bearings and rotor. Wobble the rotor with your hands and the front bearing will come out.
  • Step 5 Reinstall the spindle nut with just a few threads. Grabbing the rotor with both hands, pull the rotor off with slight down pressure and with a quick ****. The spindle nut will grab the rear bearing and seal as you pull the rotor off and come out at the same time.
  • Step 6 Install the bearings into the new rotor. Grease the bearings first and install the rear large bearing then install the grease seal with the hammer. Install the rotor on the spindle and insert the front small bearing followed by the large washer and the retaining nut.
  • Step 7 Tighten the retaining nut just until there is no longer any freeplay then tighten an additional 90 degrees. Do not over tighten the retaining nut as it will not allow the bearings to expand and they will wear out rapidly. Install the cotter pin.
  • Step 8 Install the caliper support and caliper in the reverse order they were taken off. Install the wheels and let the vehicle down. Check the brake fluid and fill as necessary to the proper level.
  • Step 9 Start the vehicle and pump the brakes very slowly until you have a high pedal. Remember that by expanding the calipers they have to re-adjust. You will not have any braking when you first start the car. Do not try to move the car until you have pumped the brake pedal sufficiently to feel a firm pedal
  • Nov 11, 2009 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

    1 Answer

    How to i remove rotors off of a 1991crown victoria


    1. Raise and safely support the vehicle.
    2. Remove the wheel and tire assembly.
    3. Remove the caliper from the spindle and rotor, but do not disconnect the brake hose. Suspend the caliper inside the fender housing with a length of wire. Do not let the caliper hang by the brake hose.
    4. Remove the grease cap from the hub and remove the cotter pin, nut retainer and adjusting nut.
    5. Grasp the hub/rotor assembly and pull it out far enough to loosen the washer and outer wheel bearing. Push the hub/rotor assembly back onto the spindle and remove the washer and outer wheel bearing.
    6. Remove the hub/rotor assembly from the spindle.
    7. Inspect the rotor for scoring and wear. Replace or machine as necessary. If machining, observe the minimum thickness specification.

    1. If the rotor is being replaced, remove the protective coating from the new rotor with brake cleaner. Pack a new set of bearings with high-temperature wheel bearing grease and install the inner roller bearing in the inner cup. Pack grease lightly between the lips of a new seal and install the seal, using a seal installer.
    2. If the original rotor is being installed, make sure the grease in the hub is clean and adequate, the inner bearing and grease seal are lubricated and in good condition, and the rotor braking surfaces are clean.
    3. Install the hub/rotor assembly on the spindle. Keep the assembly centered on the spindle to prevent damage to the grease seal or spindle threads.
    4. Install the outer wheel bearing, washer and adjusting nut. Adjust the wheel bearings according to the procedure in , then install the nut retainer, cotter pin and grease cap.

    Nov 08, 2009 | 1991 Ford LTD Crown Victoria

    1 Answer

    Wheel bearings on 1988 chevy S-10


    remove grease cap,brake caliper, then remove nut holding rotor now remove rotor, remove grease seal now both bearings should be out ,if replacing races then punch them out and tap new ones in, repack new bearings with grease install rear one and install new grease seal, slide rotor on slide frt bearing on, install washer and nut, tight a little to nearest cotterpin hole,put cotterpin in and put caliper on, hope this helps,good luck.

    Oct 27, 2009 | 1988 Chevrolet S-10

    1 Answer

    How to remove rear rotor on 06 Acura TL


    They are pretty easy. I just did my friends front rotors and pads on an 01' Acura TL's. Pull all wheels off. Take pads off shoud be a 14mm to take the calipers off. Compress the calipers. Hang up your calipers w/ wire or string so they are not hanging by the brake line. Next look on the back side of the carrier. There will be 2 17mm bolts holding a the bracket for the calipers and pads. If you have trouble breaking them free, use a brass or dead blow hammer on the wrench. (You will be doing the same to tighten the bolts back up.) Next there will be 2 phillips head screws on the rotors. Now these can be a royal pain to get out w/ out stripping the head of the scews. I used an impact tool w/ a hammer to get them out. The craftsman one runs about 30 bucks. (It is not an air tool. It just looks like an oversized screw driver. It is spring loaded, so when you nail it w/ the hammer you will want to twist at the same time and it will break the screws loose.) Once those screws are out pull the rotors off. Degrease the new ones and reverse the process. Make sure you use the impact tool to put the screws back in. Hopefully the rotors come w/ them.
    If you change your rotors I suggest changing the pads also.
    This was for the fronts on an 01 Acura TL. I do not know if there is a difference between the years. Pay close attention when you start to pull the rotor off. Should be the same process for the rear I do not know. The only thing that might be different on the rear is that the bearing is in the rotor. Check the back rotors to see what they are. (If bearings are in the rear rotors, buy Bendix rotors for the rear. They come w/ the bearing carriers already in the rotor so you do not have to press them in. Buy grease and rear seal for rear rotors. Pack the bearing w/ new grease, put seal in back or rotor, make sure it is flush and put the rotor back on.)

    Oct 10, 2009 | 2004 Acura TL

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