Question about 1991 Buick Park Avenue

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I just replaced my rear brake drum cylinders. I bled the system, made sure clear fluid was running through it with no air bubbles, and that everything was put back together correctly. when I started up the car, however, I had no resistance on my brake pedal and my rear passenger brake was not operating at all. I re-bled the system and made sure there were no leeks. Still no brake resistance. Thinking it might be a bad master cylinder, I purchased a new one, replaced it, and made sure everything was installed correctly with fresh brake fluid. It got my brake working again and I have brake resistance when the car is off, but when I turn it on there isn't any brake resistance still. I'm thinking maybe my power booster isn't working correctly, but I am not entirely sure. It is not my ABS system either I made sure that was working correctly while test driving it. I also don't think I did anything wrong in the process of replacing any of the parts, but it wouldn't surprise me if I did. I really am thinking its my power booster, but I'm hoping to get some other suggestions. Thanks.

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  • Buick Master
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The booster only makes the pedal easy to push,this would not be the problem,make sure the shoes are adjusted to where the wheel drags on the brakes as you turn the wheel,this is with no brake pressure applied.The shoes on both sides,both wheels,need to drag on the drums as you turn the wheels by hand,not so tight they are hard to turn by hand ,but where the wheel can not be free spun by hand,or when spinning the wheel,it does not just keep spinning,it will stop shortly after you remove your hand,this will bring the brake pedal up,and give it firmness.

Posted on Sep 10, 2010

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2 Answers

Brakes went out,master cylinder is dry. filled the master cylinder pumped brakes and bled rear drivers side


    If there is a substantial fluid eruption, there are air bubbles still trapped in the system. You must repeat the bleeding procedure to remove that air. A modest disturbance in the fluid returning to the reservoir indicates a properly bled brakesystem.

    How To: Bleed Your Brakes - Feature - Car and Driver

    www.caranddriver.com/.../how-to-bleed-your-brakes-feature Car and Driver
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How To: Bleed Your Brakes - Feature - Car and Driver

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Car and DriverIf there is a substantial fluid eruption, there are air bubbles still trapped in the system. You must repeat the bleeding procedure to remove that air. A modest disturbance in the fluid returning to the reservoir indicates a properly bled brake system.

How to Bleed Brakes - Tips on Bleeding Brakes

Jan 01, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

No brake pressure...


I would keep bleeding. If there is not any brake fluid leaking, there must be air in the system. with the master cyl cap off, open one bleeder valve on the front and let it bleed for 10 mins. close and repeat with the rest. there must be an air bubble in the system! good luck

Nov 07, 2013 | Ford F-250 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Brake help 88 GMC sierra


there is a leak in the system and air is being introduced. if you cant find the leak in line with the plumbing or at one of the calipers or wheel cylinders then a faulty brake booster or torn boot could be the issue. it is also possible you didnt properly bleed all the air out. bleed each wheel until new clear fluid with no spurts or air bubbles comes out to be sure

Oct 15, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How do I bleed brakes on a dodge stratus 1998


  • PRESSURE BLEEDING
  • MANUAL BLEEDING
  • Print
    For vehicles equipped with an Anti-lock Brake System (ABS), please refer to the ABS bleeding procedure at the end of this section.
    The purpose of bleeding the brakes is to expel air trapped in the hydraulic system. The system must be bled whenever the pedal feels spongy, indicating that compressible air has entered the system. It must also be bled whenever the system has been opened or repaired. If you are not using a pressure bleeder, you will need a helper for this job.

    WARNING Never reuse brake fluid which has been bled from the brake system.


    MASTER CYLINDER

    See Figure 1
    If the master cylinder is off the vehicle, it can be bench bled.

    1. Secure the master cylinder in a bench vise.
    2. Connect 2 short pieces of brake line to the outlet fittings, bend them until the free end is below the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoirs.
    3. Fill the reservoir with fresh DOT 3 type brake fluid.
    4. Using a wooden dowel, or equivalent, pump the piston slowly several times until no more air bubbles appear in the reservoirs.



    0900c15280089cdc.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig. Fig. 1: Attach bleeding tubes to the master cylinder and position them as shown

    1. Disconnect the 2 short lines, refill the master cylinder and securely install the cylinder cap.
    2. If the master cylinder is on the vehicle, it can still be bled, using a flare nut wrench.
    3. Open the brake lines slightly with the flare nut wrench, while pressure is applied to the brake pedal by a helper inside the vehicle.
    4. Be sure to tighten the line before the brake pedal is released.
    5. Repeat the process with both lines until no air bubbles come out.
    6. Bleed the complete brake system, if necessary.

    If the master cylinder has been thoroughly bled and filled to the proper level upon installation into the vehicle, it is not necessary to bleed the entire hydraulic system.


    PRESSURE BLEEDING

    When bleeding the brakes, air may be trapped in the brake lines or valves far upstream, as much as 10 feet from the bleeder screw. Therefore, it is very important to have a fast flow of a large volume of brake fluid when bleeding the brakes, to make sure all of the air is expelled from the system.
    On Cirrus, Stratus, Sebring convertible and Breeze models, the following wheel sequence should be used to ensure that all the air is removed from the system:


    Left rear wheel Right front wheel Right rear wheel Left front wheel
    On Sebring coupe and Avenger models, the following wheel sequence should be used to ensure that all the air is removed from the system:


    Right rear wheel Left front wheel Left rear wheel Right front wheel

    1. You should use bleeder tank tool C-3496-B or equivalent, with the required adapter for the master cylinder reservoir to pressurize the hydraulic system for bleeding. Make sure to follow the manufacturer's directions for using a pressure bleeder.
    2. Attach a clear plastic hose to the bleeder screw located at the right rear wheel, then place the hose into a clean jar that has enough fresh brake fluid to submerge the end of the hose.
    3. Open the bleeder screw at least one full turn or more to get a steady stream of fluid.
    4. After about 4-8 oz. of fluid has been bled through the brake system and an air-free flow is maintained in the hose and jar, close the bleeder screw.
    5. Repeat the procedure at all the other remaining bleeder screws. Then, check the pedal for travel. If pedal travel is excessive or has not improved, enough fluid has not passed through the system to expel all of the trapped air. Be sure to monitor the fluid level in the pressure bleeder. It must stay at the proper level so air will not be allowed to re-enter the brake system through the master cylinder reservoir.
    6. Once the bleeding procedure is complete, remove the pressure bleeding equipment from the master cylinder.


    MANUAL BLEEDING

    See Figure 2
    Proper manual bleeding of the hydraulic brake system will require the use of an assistant.
    On Cirrus, Stratus, Sebring convertible and Breeze models, the following wheel sequence should be used to ensure that all the air is removed from the system:


    Left rear wheel Right front wheel Right rear wheel Left front wheel
    On Sebring coupe and Avenger models, the following wheel sequence should be used to ensure that all the air is removed from the system:


    Right rear wheel Left front wheel Left rear wheel Right front wheel


    0900c15280089cdd.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig. Fig. 2: With a clear plastic hose in a container of clean brake fluid, open the bleeder screw at least one full turn

    1. Attach a clear plastic hose to the bleeder screw located at the right rear wheel, then place the hose into a clean jar that has enough fresh brake fluid to submerge the end of the hose.
    2. Have an assistant pump the brake pedal 3-4 times, and hold it down before the bleeder screw is opened.
    3. Open the bleeder screw at least one full turn. When the bleeder screw opens, the brake pedal will drop.
    4. Close the bleeder screw. Release the brake pedal only AFTER the bleeder screw is closed.
    5. Repeat the procedure 4 or 5 times at each bleeder screw, then check the pedal for travel. If the pedal travel is not excessive, or has not been improved, enough fluid has not passed through the system to expel all of the trapped air. Make sure to watch the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir. It must stay at the proper level so air will not re-enter the brake system.
    6. Test drive the vehicle to be sure the brakes are operating correctly and that the pedal is solid.

    May 31, 2012 | 1998 Dodge Stratus

    2 Answers

    Front and rear drum brakes, the pads are ok, but the brake pedal started going to the floor. When I tried to bleed them, the rear bleeder screws broke. So I replaced both wheel cylinders. The rubber...


    OK........as you have stated that you have bled the brakes properly.....was there fluid coming out each bleed nipple as a flowing stream...????

    And did you shut off the bleed nipple half way down stroke....?????

    If this is all ok, then I would be looking at a failed master cylinder.......and what is occurring is the fluid is leaking from the primary to the secondary within the master cylinder !!!!!

    Mar 31, 2011 | Ford Mustang Cars & Trucks

    1 Answer

    I replaced the whole back break line,as i try to bleed them i get fluid out of the front passenger side and the back driver side,but nothing out of the other two.whats the problem?


    Hi, your proportioning valve is stuck. Take the caps off and recenter the one stuck valve. Then rebleed the system using the procedure below. Thanks for using fixya.

    jturcotte_1047.gif
    For those of us who are not fortunate enough to have access to a power bleeding tool, the manual brake bleeding procedure will quite adequately remove air from the hydraulic system. The major difference between the pressure and manual bleeding procedures is that the manual method takes more time and will require help from an assistant. One person must depress the brake pedal, while another opens and closes the bleeder screws.
    1. Deplete the vacuum reserve by applying the brakes several times with the ignition OFF .
    2. Clean the top of the master cylinder, remove the cover and fill the reservoirs with clean fluid.
    3. The master cylinder must be bled first if it is suspected to contain air. If the master cylinder was removed and bench bled before installation it must still be bled, but it should take less time and effort. Bleed the master cylinder as follows:
      1. Position a container under the master cylinder to catch the brake fluid.
      2. Loosen the front brake line(s) at the master cylinder and allow the fluid to flow from the front port.




    WARNING Do not allow brake fluid to spill on or come in contact with the vehicle's finish as it will remove the paint. In case of a spill, immediately flush the area with water.

    1. Tighten the line connection(s).
    2. Have an assistant depress and hold the brake pedal.
    3. Loosen the line connection(s) again, allowing air to escape from the master cylinder.
    4. Tighten the line(s), then have the assistant release the brake pedal and wait for 15 seconds.
    5. Repeat steps D through F until the line(s) are free of air.
    6. When finished bleeding the air from the master cylinder, tighten the line connections to 20 ft. lbs. (27 Nm).
    7. Repeat steps B through H, only with the master cylinder rear pipe fitting(s).

    1. Refill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid.



    WARNING Never reuse brake fluid that has been bled from the system.

    1. If a single line or fitting was the only hydraulic line disconnected, then only the caliper(s) or wheel cylinder(s) affected by that line must be bled. If the master cylinder required bleeding, then all calipers and wheel cylinders must be bled in the proper sequence:
      1. Right rear
      2. Left rear
      3. Right front
      4. Left front

    2. Bleed the individual calipers or wheel cylinders as follows:
      1. Place a suitable wrench over the bleeder screw and attach a clear plastic hose over the screw end. Be sure the hose is seated snugly on the screw or you may be squirted with brake fluid.
      2. Submerge the other end of the tube in a transparent container of clean brake fluid.
      3. With the help of an assistant, apply the brake pedal slowly and hold.


    During the bleeding procedure, make sure your assistant does NOT release the brake pedal while a fitting is loosened or while a bleeder screw is opening. Air will be drawn back into the system.
    1. While the assistant continues to apply pressure to the brake pedal, loosen the bleeder screw, and watch for air bubbles in the container.

    Be very careful when loosening the wheel cylinder and brake caliper bleeding screws. The bleeder screws often rust in position and may easily break off if forced. To help prevent the possibility of breaking a bleeder screw, spray it with some penetrating oil before attempting to loosen it. Installing a new bleeder screw will often require removal of the component and may include overhaul or replacement of the wheel cylinder/caliper.
    1. Tighten the bleeder screw.
    2. Instruct the assistant to release the brake pedal.
    3. Wait approximately 15 seconds, and instruct the assistant to depress the brake pedal again.

    Remember, if the reservoir is allowed to empty of fluid during the procedure, air will be drawn into the system and the bleeding procedure must be restarted at the master cylinder assembly.
    1. Repeat steps C through F until there are no air bubbles present in the container.

    1. Check the pedal for a hard feeling with the engine not running. If the pedal is soft, repeat the bleeding procedure until a firm pedal is obtained.
    2. If the brake warning light is on, depress the brake pedal firmly. If there is no air in the system, the light will go out.
    3. Once all the air is bled from the system, install the bleeder screw caps.
    4. After bleeding, make sure that a firm pedal is achieved before attempting to move the vehicle.

    Feb 14, 2011 | 1994 Pontiac Grand Am

    1 Answer

    What is the sequence to bleed the brakes on a 1994 Chevy Suburban?


    Bleeding the Brakes
    EXCEPT HYDRO-BOOST OR ABS(see Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4)
    To bleed the brakes on a vehicle equipped with ABS, please refer to the ABS bleeding procedure in this section.
    The brake system must be bled when any brake line is disconnected or there is air in the system.
    Never bleed a wheel cylinder when a drum is removed.
    1. Clean the master cylinder of excess dirt and remove the cylinder cover and the diaphragm.
    2. Fill the master cylinder to the proper level. Check the fluid level periodically during the bleeding process and replenish it as necessary. Do not allow the master cylinder to run dry, or you will have to start over.
    3. Before opening any of the bleeder screws, you may want to give each one a shot of penetrating solvent. This reduces the possibility of breakage when they are unscrewed.
    97e350f.jpg

    Fig. 1: Connect one end of a clear plastic tube to the bleeder screw and submerge the other end in clean brake fluid

    506ad18.jpg

    Fig. 2: Have an assistant pump, then hold in the brake pedal, while you bleed each wheel

    eea0a0a.gif

    Fig. 3: Using the combination valve depressor-R/V Series

    640f041.gif

    Fig. 4: Using the combination valve depressor-C/K Series
    1. Attach a length of vinyl hose to the bleeder screw of the brake to be bled. Insert the other end of the hose into a clear jar half full of clean brake fluid, so that the end of the hose is beneath the level of fluid. The correct sequence for bleeding is to work from the brake farthest from the master cylinder to the one closest; right rear, left rear, right front, left front.
    2. The combination valve must be held open during the bleeding process. A clip, tape, or other similar tool (or an assistant) will hold the metering pin in.
    3. Depress and release the brake pedal three or four times to exhaust any residual vacuum.
    4. Have an assistant push down on the brake pedal and hold it down. Open the bleeder valve slightly. As the pedal reaches the end of its travel, close the bleeder screw and release the brake pedal. Repeat this process until no air bubbles are visible in the expelled fluid.
    Make sure your assistant presses the brake pedal to the floor slowly. Pressing too fast will cause air bubbles to form in the fluid.
    1. Repeat this procedure at each of the brakes. Remember to check the master cylinder level occasionally. Use only fresh fluid to refill the master cylinder, not the stuff bled from the system.
    2. When the bleeding process is complete, refill the master cylinder, install its cover and diaphragm, and discard the fluid bled from the brake system.
    HYDRO-BOOSTThe system should be bled whenever the booster is removed and installed.
    1. Fill the power steering pump until the fluid level is at the base of the pump reservoir neck. Disconnect the battery lead from the distributor.
    Remove the electrical lead to the fuel solenoid terminal on the injection pump before cranking the engine.
    1. Jack up the front of the car, turn the wheels all the way to the left, and crank the engine for a few seconds.
    2. Check steering pump fluid level. If necessary, add fluid to the "ADD" mark on the dipstick.
    3. Lower the car, connect the battery lead, and start the engine. Check fluid level and add fluid to the "ADD" mark, as necessary. With the engine running, turn the wheels from side to side to bleed air from the system. Make sure that the fluid level stays above the internal pump casting.
    4. The Hydro-Boost system should now be fully bled. If the fluid is foaming after bleeding, stop the engine, let the system set for one hour, then repeat the second part of Step 4.
    The preceding procedures should be effective in removing the excess air from the system, however sometimes air may still remain trapped. When this happens the booster may make a gulping noise when the brake is applied. Lightly pumping the brake pedal with the engine running should cause this noise to disappear. After the noise stops, check the pump fluid level and add as necessary.


    Hope helps with this (remember comment and rated this).

    Jun 19, 2010 | Cars & Trucks

    1 Answer

    How do i bleed my brakes for my 1998 Ford Ranger? When i push the brake pedal it goes all the way to the floor.


    First I would figure out why it needs to be bled, if it was leaking somewhere, or fluid low, new caliper, etc.

    Brake bleeding is the procedure performed on hydraulic brake systems whereby the brake lines (the pipes and hoses containing the brake fluid) are purged of any air bubbles. This is necessary because, while the brake fluid is an incompressible liquid, air bubbles are compressible gas and their presence in the brake system greatly reduces the hydraulic pressure that can be developed within the system.

    The process is performed by forcing clean, bubble-free brake fluid through the entire system from the master cylinder(s) to the calipers of disc brakes or the wheel cylinders of drum brakes). The brake bleeder is normally mounted at the highest point on each cylinder or caliper. Brake bleeding can be done easily by two persons working together and doesn't require much technical expertise besides a basic knowledge of brakes and car hydraulics. One wheel at a time, the brake bleeding valve for that wheel is opened while a drain hose is attached to that valve and immersed into a pool of brake fluid. The assistant then pumps the brake pedal. In this manner, fresh fluid is forced through the system into that wheel's caliper or wheel cylinder, and any old, dirty, water-saturated or bubble-entrained fluid is expelled from the system. When the fluid from the caliper or wheel cylinder runs clean, clear, and bubble-free, the brake bleeding valve is closed and the drain tube removed. The process is then repeated for the remaining wheels. During the entire process, the brake fluid reservoir must be kept full of fresh fluid lest new air bubbles be introduced into the brake system. (As found on Wikipedia)

    It would be important to note that the person pumping the brake should press slowly and tell you when they are nearing the end of the pedal stroke to you can close the bleed valve before you **** air back into the system. REMEMBER to keep brake fluid in the reservoir at the master cylindermag-glass_10x10.gif.

    Hope this helps. It's pretty easy and best done with 2 people, they hav vacuum bleeders which can be done with 1 person but the results are not consistant or perfect.

    Jun 24, 2009 | 1998 Ford Ranger SuperCab

    1 Answer

    Bad brakes on gmc suburban, replaced master cylinder,rear wheel cylinder and abs control module,bled system,still have spongy brakes and ABS come on right before it gets stopped.


    Gravity bleed your brakes starting at the wheel farthest from the master cylinder. No pweddle pumping. I Fill M/C and leave cover off. Then open the bleeder and watch what is coming out. Uou can see bubbles. When the fluid drips steady and without bubbles, cole and do the same to the other three. Don't let the master cykinder get low because thr fluid level helps move the fluid and air through the lines.Periodically tap the break lone with your wrench to keep everything moving.. When sll bleeders drip clean and steady. Make sore your rear brakes are adjusted to barely touch the drum. Then top off the master cylinder, cap it and give yourself a "break". :)

    Jun 15, 2009 | 1997 GMC Sierra K2500

    1 Answer

    Spongie brakes


    Gravity bleeding doesnt usually work real well.

    Get a clear jar of some type, and a piece of 1/4 inch vacuum hose about 18 inches long. Put about 2 inches of new brake fluid in the container.

    Start at the passenger rear wheel, losen the bleeder, slide the hose tightly over the open bleeder, the other end in the jar where you can see the hose end.
    Fill master cylinder reservoir.

    Pump brake no more than 4 times, watching the hose end in the jar for bubbles. After 4 pumps, check reservoir, refill. Pump 4 more times. Watch for bubbles. Check reservoir, pump 4 more times. If you see bubbles at any time, then keep going through the above steps until you stop seeing bubbles.

    Go to rear wheel, tighten bleeder. Go to driver rear wheel, and do the same thing, although this time it won't take but 4-6 pumps to purge any air.

    Go to passenger front, repeat.
    Go to driver front, repeat.

    Do not recycle any of the fluid.

    Jan 28, 2009 | 1991 GMC C1500

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