Question about 2002 Chrysler Town & Country

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Replace rear brake pads How do you back off the

Replace rear brake pads How do you back off the brake shoes?

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  • Chrysler Master
  • 8,518 Answers

There is a rubber plug back below the brake line. Remove the plug and use a regular screwdriver to reach in and turn the adjuster. I think you want to turn it down, but if that makes it tighter I'm obviously wrong. You will have to turn it many times to get them loose. If you have more questions, please reply.

Posted on Sep 10, 2010

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  • Master
  • 385 Answers

I'm a little confused by your question, so if I'm off remember, I was just trying to help. you have rear pads (disc brakes)? and are trying to get the caliper pistons to retract so you can get the pads on? If that's right, use a C-clamp to push the pistons back. After you're done, depress the brake pedal several times before starting the car to make the pistons push back out and take up the slack, and raise the foot pedal to its normal height.
If you have drum brakes (with shoes) and are trying to back off the pressure, hold the flange that prevents the star wheel adjuster from turning the wrong way up out of the way, and turn the star wheel in the reverse direction.

Posted on Sep 10, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Louie_3006
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SOURCE: how to change rear brake shoe pads of 2005 mitsubishi lancer

Hello, this do it yourself project is very manageable if it is brake pads that you are replacing on your car; if they are disc shoes it may be a little bit harder. In essence a brake job can be done straight out of a auto manual for your car and is not to diffucult as long as you follow good safety procedures while jacking up your vehicle and removing your wheels. First, I would park your car and setting your parking break will make your rear brakes impossible to get off so do not set it. I would however keep this in mind and be very careful working on your car then. I would chaulk your front wheel with a chaulk block or a brick. I would loosen your lug nuts just to break the intial torque I would then jack up the rear of your vehicle and set jack stands under your car in the proper locations. Then systematically, remover your wheel and then the two bolts holding your caliper to the spindle. Carefully, remove the caliper and do not let it hang becuase you will bend your brake line. Remove old shoes, then compress the caliper with a caliper compression tool from your local auto parts store or a c-clamp and a small block of wood. Inspect the rotor for deep gouges, a blue tint, or if you know you have gotten them really hot before I would replace the rotor. Next, install the new brake pads, put rotor back onto spindle and insert bolts back into caliper housing. Repeat for the next side and put the wheel back on and remember to torque your lug nuts to the proper specification. I hope this fixes your problem for you!

Posted on May 25, 2009

  • 10 Answers

SOURCE: 2002 Jetta Brakes

On one of the front driver side pads there is a sensor for low pads. He either did not hook it back up or got a lose connection to it.

Posted on Jan 08, 2009

  • 88 Answers

SOURCE: changing back break pads on volvo s40 2000 model

use a C clamp to push the caliper back in.

Posted on May 19, 2009

  • 33 Answers

SOURCE: How to replace rear brake pads - issue with getting pistons back

does it hav a drum or rotor? if drum then get a hanes manual if rotor grab a big pair of pliers and squeeze. also put the old pads back on and put the caliper back on and take a screwdriver near the top of the cailper put it in between the rotor and cailper and pull towards you firmly and steady.

Posted on Aug 08, 2009

AUTODOC01
  • 216 Answers

SOURCE: Changing the back rotors and brake pads. The

its more or less and backing plate you can drive without it it keeps brakes cool and gravell free > speaking as a tech you should replace it?

Posted on Aug 27, 2009

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1 Answer

Help with installing brake shoes on 1993 buick park ave


Your Buick has front disc brakes...and rear drum brakes...the usual concern is the front pads as they are used more...these are the easiest pads to replace...as you only need to remove the caliper from the rotor with 2 bolts to lift off...Be sure to push the piston all the way back into the caliper to install new pads...rotors are pop offs too...The rear drum is different...the brake shoes are held on with clips and springs...try keeping one of the shoe assemblies intact while you switch out the other shoes...be sure to inspect the rear wheel brake cylinders for possible leaking...usually an oil build up inside the brake drum...these are inexpensive and should be switched out on a 93 Buick...:) Hope this helps.

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Rear brakes scrubbing are they pads or drums


pads go with disc brakes
shoes go with drum brakes.

If you have drums in the back, the rear brake shoes may be worn out or are not held together with the springs (a spring may have broken).

Have the brakes checked as soon as possible for broken or worn parts.

Good luck on this repair.

Dec 31, 2010 | 1999 Chrysler Concorde

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How to remove brake rotors on a 1996 ford explorer


How to replace the rear brake pads on a 1995 through 2001 Ford Explorer The system utilizes a drum-in-hat type rear brake rotor. The integral drum allows the use of a drum-and-shoe type parking brake system. All other components are similar to their front disc brake components Remove the two bolts on either side of the brake hose with the rubber boots. Do not remove the four bolts where the axle ties in. The two bolts to be removed require a 10mm socket/wrench. Loosen the pads from the caliper Rotor Removal In order to take the rotors off (replace with new or have them machined), it is best to loosen the emergency brake shoes. To do this, behind the rotors, in the back there is a rubber plug, remove that and you can use a screw driver to engage the teeth of the adjusting screw, turn it clockwise to loosen, usually 10-20 teeth. Usually this means turn it downward. After this, it may still be difficult to get the rotors off without tapping them. Use a rubber mallet and hit them from behind. Before really whacking the rotor, make sure you have loosened the adjusting screw enough. It may take heavy swings of the rubber hammer to do this. It will eventually break loose. Parking Brake You might want to check the parking brake while you are here. To remove:
  • Remove the rear disc brake rotor.
  • Remove the outboard return spring.
  • Remove the adjusting screw spring.
  • Remove the rear brake shoe hold-down spring and pin.
  • Remove the brake shoe adjusting screw and nut.
  • Remove the front brake shoe hold-down spring and pin.
  • Remove both parking brake shoes and the inboard return spring.
  • Check the parking brake lever for excessive wear and replace as necessary.
To install:
  • Position the front parking brake shoe to the backing plate and install the hold-down pin and spring.
  • Install the rear parking brake shoe with the inboard return spring.
  • Position the brake shoe adjuster screw and nut on the shoes and install the rear shoe hold-down pin and spring.
  • Install the brake shoe adjuster spring.
  • Install the outboard return spring.
  • Adjust the parking brake shoes and install the rotor, caliper and wheel.
  • Lower the vehicle and tighten the wheel lug nuts to 100 ft. lbs. (135 Nm).
ADJUSTMENT
  • Measure the inside of the drum portion of the rear brake rotor
  • Remove the rear disc brake rotor.
  • Using Brake Adjustment Gauge D81L-1103-A or equivalent, measure the inside diameter of the drum portion of the rear disc brake rotor.
  • Subtract 0.020 in. (0.508mm) from the first measurement, adjust the brake shoes to that size
  • Adjust the parking brake adjuster screw until the outside diameter of the parking brake shoes measures 0.020 in. (0.508mm) less than the drum measurement.
  • Install the rear disc brake rotor.
Reassembly Reassembly is easy. Put new or machined rotors back on by sliding them over the lugs (they should slide on easily.) Loosen bleeder valve (having a catch bottle handy is good). Push calipers in slowly (using a c-clamp or large channel lock pliers), close bleeder valve. Put on pads. Lubricate metal clips with small amount of anti-seize. Re-adjust the emergency brake by turning the opposite direction from loosening. Refill the brake master cylinder

Aug 09, 2010 | 1996 Ford Explorer

1 Answer

Asking which kind of brake in back rear driver makes a lot a nois


You have brake rotors and pads on the front. Looking on the rear axle if it looks like the front it will be rear rotor and pads. And if you cannot see the rotor or pads on the rear axle then you will have what is called rear drums and brake shoes. Hope this will help you.

May 20, 2010 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How do u get the old brake pads off the back of a dodge durango 2004


NOT THIS IS FOR 4WD 5.7L
Brake Relining
  • Brake linings that are worn to within 1/32 inch (0.79 mm) of a rivet head or that have been contaminated with brake fluid, grease, or oil must be replaced.
f45-27.gif Potential brake shoe problems. Courtesy of Wagner Brake Products.
  • Failure to replace worn linings results in a scored drum. When it is necessary to replace brake shoes, they must also be replaced on the wheel on the opposite side of the vehicle. Inspect brake shoes for distortion, cracks, or looseness. If these conditions exist, the shoe must be discarded.
  • Do not let brake fluid, oil, or grease touch the brake lining.
  • If a brake lining kit is used to replace the linings, follow the instructions in the kit and install all the parts provided.
  • The two general methods of attaching the linings to the brake shoes are bonding and riveting.
  • The bonded linings are fastened with a special adhesive to the shoe, clamped in place, then cured in an oven. Instead of using an adhesive, some linings are riveted to the shoe.
  • Riveted linings allow for better heat transfer than bonded linings.
Drum Shoe and Brake Installation
  • Before installing the shoes, be sure to sand or stone the inner edge of the shoe to dress down any slight lining or metal nicks and burrs that could interfere with the sliding upon the support pads.
  • A support (backing) plate must be tight on its mount and not bent. Stone the shoe support pads brightly and dress down any burrs or grooves that could cause the shoes to bind or hang up.
  • Using an approved lubricant, lightly coat the support pads and the threads of servo star wheel adjusters. On rear axle parking brakes, lubricate any point of potential binding in the linkage and the cable. Do not lubricate nonservo brake adjusters other than to free a frozen adjuster with penetrating oil.
fr_45.30.3184.gif The areas or pads where the brake show will rub or contact the backing plate.
  • Reassemble the brakes in the reverse order of disassembly. Make sure all parts are in their proper locations and that both brake shoes are properly positioned in either end of the adjuster.
  • Also, both brake shoes should correctly engage the wheel cylinder pushrods and parking brake links.
  • They should be centered on the backing plate. Parking brake links and levers should be in place on the rear brakes.
  • With all of the parts in place, replace the brake drum.

May 22, 2010 | 2004 Dodge Durango

1 Answer

Changing the brake pads


  • Brake linings that are worn to within 1/32 inch (0.79 mm) of a rivet head or that have been contaminated with brake fluid, grease, or oil must be replaced.
f45-27.gif Potential brake shoe problems. Courtesy of Wagner Brake Products.
  • Failure to replace worn linings results in a scored drum. When it is necessary to replace brake shoes, they must also be replaced on the wheel on the opposite side of the vehicle. Inspect brake shoes for distortion, cracks, or looseness. If these conditions exist, the shoe must be discarded.
  • Do not let brake fluid, oil, or grease touch the brake lining.
  • If a brake lining kit is used to replace the linings, follow the instructions in the kit and install all the parts provided.
  • The two general methods of attaching the linings to the brake shoes are bonding and riveting.
  • The bonded linings are fastened with a special adhesive to the shoe, clamped in place, then cured in an oven. Instead of using an adhesive, some linings are riveted to the shoe.
  • Riveted linings allow for better heat transfer than bonded linings.
Drum Shoe and Brake Installation
  • Before installing the shoes, be sure to sand or stone the inner edge of the shoe to dress down any slight lining or metal nicks and burrs that could interfere with the sliding upon the support pads.
  • A support (backing) plate must be tight on its mount and not bent. Stone the shoe support pads brightly and dress down any burrs or grooves that could cause the shoes to bind or hang up.
  • Using an approved lubricant, lightly coat the support pads and the threads of servo star wheel adjusters. On rear axle parking brakes, lubricate any point of potential binding in the linkage and the cable. Do not lubricate nonservo brake adjusters other than to free a frozen adjuster with penetrating oil.
fr_45.30.3184.gif The areas or pads where the brake show will rub or contact the backing plate.
  • Reassemble the brakes in the reverse order of disassembly. Make sure all parts are in their proper locations and that both brake shoes are properly positioned in either end of the adjuster.
  • Also, both brake shoes should correctly engage the wheel cylinder pushrods and parking brake links.
  • They should be centered on the backing plate. Parking brake links and levers should be in place on the rear brakes.
  • With all of the parts in place, replace the brake drum.

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1 Answer

My first brake job


I am assuming you have front disc and rear shoes? The front pads are just about as simple as it gets. Two 3/8 allen bolts to take off, one simple piston to push back in and replace pads. (this is assuming you are not metal to metal and the rotors do not need to be turned. The rear should be shoes and just follow the same procedure in reverse after taking them off. BTW remember the larger brake shoe goes towards the back of the vehicle.

Nov 01, 2008 | 1988 Chevrolet Suburban

1 Answer

2005 Pontiac Aztek Parking Brake


The E-brake just needs adjusted up on the pads or rear shoes. If shoes on the rear instead of pads, it will hold from rolling back but not forward if not getting full pressure from the brake shoes needing adjusted up closer to the drum. It will hold from back roll because of shoe design. More shoe surface on the rear shoe than on the front shoe. That's the way they're built.

Nov 11, 2017 | 2002 Pontiac Aztek

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2002 GMC Sierra 1500 rear brakes


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Rear brakes lock up


Not wanting to be too general but at least trying to help I would suggest looking under the back end, and specifically at the rear backing plates and to the insides of the rear wheels, to see if you notice any fluids dripping. If these are drum brakes, then you could very well have either a wheel cylinder leaking brake fluid, causing the brake shoe linings to swell up, or it could be a leaking axle seal, allowing differential gear lube out, which will also cause the linings to swell, and minor braking will cause that particular side to lock up.
If this vehicle has rear disk brakes, or was just recently changed from rear drum brakes to rear disk brakes, it is possible that the proportioning valve in the brake line was not changed to match with the disk setup.
Drum brakes operate at approximately ten pounds per square inch pressure (10 PSI) whereas disk units operate at a lower pressure of about 2 PSI.
Just some things to look at. Some brake fluids have no smell, others are very distinctive in odor, and differential gear lube has a very distinct odor...not hard to miss once you've smelled it.

Jun 20, 2008 | 1998 Chevrolet Cavalier

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