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Brake bleeding sequence vehicle has sat for years new lines installed but cant find information on how to bleed the brake system with an accumulator. 1988 alpha romeo milano

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  • Alfa Romeo Master
  • 44,383 Answers

Same as any other system

Posted on Jun 09, 2015

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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BigBlue77
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SOURCE: how to bleed brakes

Sounds like the proportioning valve is stuck. You may need to break a front bleeder loose and hit the pedal the unseat the valve. Then blead the rearbrakse and then bleed the wheel where you broke the bleeder loose. That should work.

Good Luck

Posted on Oct 12, 2008

polarcycle
  • 1392 Answers

SOURCE: BLEEDING REAR BRAKES CAN BLEED ONCE THEN SECOND

Sounds like a problem with the proportioning valve. Try not to push the pedal down to far when bleeding. The valve sounds like it is getting stuck closed, and takes a little bit to release and allow fluid to pass again.

Posted on Jun 10, 2009

  • 15 Answers

SOURCE: I am changing the rear rotors and pads on my 97

Not familiar with VW, but with many calipers you can use a c-clamp or even a pair of adjustable pliers to slowly squeeze the piston back far enough to replace the pads.

Not sure about your bleeding sequence...

Posted on Aug 01, 2009

  • 4340 Answers

SOURCE: bleeding brakes 2000 suburban wsith ab

Why were the brake lines replaced?

Sounds like the mastercylinder may have run dry. You have to bench bleed the master and then DO NOT allow fluid to run low, while bleeding brakes...

if master cylinder runs low on fluid and air gets in, almost impossible to bleed with out releasing the lines and bleed master it self.

Posted on Sep 20, 2009

techbuster
  • 5081 Answers

SOURCE: bleeding brake system how?

BLEED BRAKE SYSTEM

Make sure one end of the Jeep is raised (starting with the rear end) and secure on jack stands and the wheels on each side have been removed. If you have been working on the brakes, this should already be done.

Connect a clear rubber tube to the bleeder valve on the right rear brake caliper. Start with this end and side because it is farthest from the master cylinder.Place the tube's other end into a container partially filled with brake fluid.

Open the bleeder valve on the caliper and have an assistant press on the brake pedal inside the Jeep. Look for a mixture of air and fluid to come out of the valve. Once all the air is purged and the fluid runs cleanly from the valve, close the screw and remove the tube.

Repeat the process for all four brakes. Move to the left rear next, followed by the right front and the left front. If you need to, reconnect the Jeep's rear wheels and lower the rear end before raising the front end and removing those wheels.

Check the level of fluid in the master cylinder periodically as you bleed the brakes. If the level drops below the needed fill line, add more fluid. Use fresh fluid, not any that you have bled from the brakes.

Start the Jeep's engine after bleeding all the brakes and press on the brake pedal. You might need to do this repeatedly to seat new brake pads you just installed. Turn off the engine and hold down on the pedal. Bleed the brakes again if the pedal sink within 15 to 20 seconds.

Posted on Dec 21, 2009

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1990 jeep wrangler bleeding breaks


Hi there:
I suggest to check this procedure, when the hydraulic brake system must be bled whenever a fluid line has been disconnected because air gets into the system.

A leak in the system may sometimes be indicated by a spongy brake pedal. Air trapped in the system is compressible and does not permit the pressure applied to the brake pedal to be transmitted solidly through the brakes. The system must be absolutely free from air at all times. If the master cylinder has been overhauled or a new cylinder has been installed, bleed the cylinder on a bench before installation. When bleeding brakes, bleed at the wheel most distant from the master cylinder first, the next most distant second, and so on. During the bleeding operation the master cylinder must be kept at least 3 / 4 full of brake fluid.


The ABS bleeding procedure is different from the conventional method. It consists of the following three steps:
Step 1: Conventional manual brake bleed.
Step 2: Bleeding the system using the DRB scan tool.
Step 3: An additional conventional manual brake bleed.

The recommended ABS bleeding procedure is as follows:
  1. To bleed the brakes, first carefully clean all dirt from around the master cylinder filler cap. Remove the filler cap and fill the master cylinder with DOT 3 brake fluid to the lower edge of the filler neck.
  2. Bleed the master cylinder first. Have a helper operate the brake pedal while bleeding each master cylinder fluid outlet line. Do not allow the master cylinder to to run out of fluid,as this will allow additional air to be drawn into the cylinder.
  3. Bleed the brake system in the following sequence:
    1. Master cylinder
    2. HCU valve body (at fluid lines)
    3. Right rear wheel
    4. Left rear wheel
    5. Right front wheel
    6. Left front wheel
  4. Clean off the bleeder connections at all four wheel cylinders. Attach the bleeder hose to the right rear wheel cylinder bleeder screw and place the end of the tube in a glass jar, submerged in brake fluid.
  5. Open the bleeder valve 1/2 - 3/4 of a turn.
  6. Have an assistant depress the brake pedal slowly and allow it to return. Continue this pumping action to force any air out of the system. When bubbles cease to appear at the end of the bleeder hose, close the bleeder valve and remove the hose.
  7. Check the level of fluid in the master cylinder reservoir and replenish as necessary.
  8. After the bleeding operation at each wheel cylinder has been completed, fill the master cylinder reservoir and replace the filler plug.

Do not reuse the fluid which has been removed from the lines through the bleeding process because it contains air bubbles and dirt.


  1. Perform the "Bleed Brake'' procedure with the DRB II scan tool. This procedure is described in the DRB II software information and diagnostic guide.
    1. Attach the DRB II scan tool to the diagnostic connector.
    2. Run the Bleed Brake procedure as described in the DRB II tester guide.
  2. Repeat the conventional bleeding procedure as previously outlined.
  3. Fill the master cylinder reservoir to the proper level.
  4. Check the brake operation.


Hope this helps.

Apr 21, 2013 | Jeep Wrangler Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How do I bleed brakes on a dodge stratus 1998


  • PRESSURE BLEEDING
  • MANUAL BLEEDING
  • Print
    For vehicles equipped with an Anti-lock Brake System (ABS), please refer to the ABS bleeding procedure at the end of this section.
    The purpose of bleeding the brakes is to expel air trapped in the hydraulic system. The system must be bled whenever the pedal feels spongy, indicating that compressible air has entered the system. It must also be bled whenever the system has been opened or repaired. If you are not using a pressure bleeder, you will need a helper for this job.

    WARNING Never reuse brake fluid which has been bled from the brake system.


    MASTER CYLINDER

    See Figure 1
    If the master cylinder is off the vehicle, it can be bench bled.

    1. Secure the master cylinder in a bench vise.
    2. Connect 2 short pieces of brake line to the outlet fittings, bend them until the free end is below the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoirs.
    3. Fill the reservoir with fresh DOT 3 type brake fluid.
    4. Using a wooden dowel, or equivalent, pump the piston slowly several times until no more air bubbles appear in the reservoirs.



    0900c15280089cdc.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig. Fig. 1: Attach bleeding tubes to the master cylinder and position them as shown

    1. Disconnect the 2 short lines, refill the master cylinder and securely install the cylinder cap.
    2. If the master cylinder is on the vehicle, it can still be bled, using a flare nut wrench.
    3. Open the brake lines slightly with the flare nut wrench, while pressure is applied to the brake pedal by a helper inside the vehicle.
    4. Be sure to tighten the line before the brake pedal is released.
    5. Repeat the process with both lines until no air bubbles come out.
    6. Bleed the complete brake system, if necessary.

    If the master cylinder has been thoroughly bled and filled to the proper level upon installation into the vehicle, it is not necessary to bleed the entire hydraulic system.


    PRESSURE BLEEDING

    When bleeding the brakes, air may be trapped in the brake lines or valves far upstream, as much as 10 feet from the bleeder screw. Therefore, it is very important to have a fast flow of a large volume of brake fluid when bleeding the brakes, to make sure all of the air is expelled from the system.
    On Cirrus, Stratus, Sebring convertible and Breeze models, the following wheel sequence should be used to ensure that all the air is removed from the system:


    Left rear wheel Right front wheel Right rear wheel Left front wheel
    On Sebring coupe and Avenger models, the following wheel sequence should be used to ensure that all the air is removed from the system:


    Right rear wheel Left front wheel Left rear wheel Right front wheel

    1. You should use bleeder tank tool C-3496-B or equivalent, with the required adapter for the master cylinder reservoir to pressurize the hydraulic system for bleeding. Make sure to follow the manufacturer's directions for using a pressure bleeder.
    2. Attach a clear plastic hose to the bleeder screw located at the right rear wheel, then place the hose into a clean jar that has enough fresh brake fluid to submerge the end of the hose.
    3. Open the bleeder screw at least one full turn or more to get a steady stream of fluid.
    4. After about 4-8 oz. of fluid has been bled through the brake system and an air-free flow is maintained in the hose and jar, close the bleeder screw.
    5. Repeat the procedure at all the other remaining bleeder screws. Then, check the pedal for travel. If pedal travel is excessive or has not improved, enough fluid has not passed through the system to expel all of the trapped air. Be sure to monitor the fluid level in the pressure bleeder. It must stay at the proper level so air will not be allowed to re-enter the brake system through the master cylinder reservoir.
    6. Once the bleeding procedure is complete, remove the pressure bleeding equipment from the master cylinder.


    MANUAL BLEEDING

    See Figure 2
    Proper manual bleeding of the hydraulic brake system will require the use of an assistant.
    On Cirrus, Stratus, Sebring convertible and Breeze models, the following wheel sequence should be used to ensure that all the air is removed from the system:


    Left rear wheel Right front wheel Right rear wheel Left front wheel
    On Sebring coupe and Avenger models, the following wheel sequence should be used to ensure that all the air is removed from the system:


    Right rear wheel Left front wheel Left rear wheel Right front wheel


    0900c15280089cdd.jpg enlarge_icon.gifenlarge_tooltip.gif

    Fig. Fig. 2: With a clear plastic hose in a container of clean brake fluid, open the bleeder screw at least one full turn

    1. Attach a clear plastic hose to the bleeder screw located at the right rear wheel, then place the hose into a clean jar that has enough fresh brake fluid to submerge the end of the hose.
    2. Have an assistant pump the brake pedal 3-4 times, and hold it down before the bleeder screw is opened.
    3. Open the bleeder screw at least one full turn. When the bleeder screw opens, the brake pedal will drop.
    4. Close the bleeder screw. Release the brake pedal only AFTER the bleeder screw is closed.
    5. Repeat the procedure 4 or 5 times at each bleeder screw, then check the pedal for travel. If the pedal travel is not excessive, or has not been improved, enough fluid has not passed through the system to expel all of the trapped air. Make sure to watch the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir. It must stay at the proper level so air will not re-enter the brake system.
    6. Test drive the vehicle to be sure the brakes are operating correctly and that the pedal is solid.

    May 31, 2012 | 1998 Dodge Stratus

    1 Answer

    1991 buick park avenue brake problems got bleed the brakes on the drivers side front and rear not a problem but the passenger side front cant get the air out keeps spitting fluid and have use a half b


    If you have a manual for your vehicle, check how to bleed the system. Certain vehicles need to be bled in a certain order of sequence. If you are using a one man bleeding kit, when you don't see air bubbles in the clear tube but see only fluid, then it is bled properly.

    Oct 28, 2011 | 1991 Buick Park Avenue

    1 Answer

    Need to know procedure for bleeding brakes on1987 gmc s15 2.8 litre 4x4 front disc w/abs


    MANUAL BLEEDING

    For those of us who are not fortunate enough to have access to a power bleeding tool, the manual brake bleeding procedure will quite adequately remove air from the hydraulic system. The major difference between the pressure and manual bleeding procedures is that the manual method takes more time and will require help from an assistant. One person must depress the brake pedal, while another opens and closes the bleeder screws.

    In addition to a length of clear neoprene bleeder hose, bleeder wrenches and a clear bleeder bottle (old plastic jar or drink bottle will suffice), bleeding late-model ABS systems may also require the use of one or more relatively inexpensive combination valve pressure bleeding tools (which are used to depress one or more valves in order to allow component/system bleeding). To fully bleed the late model ABS systems, a scan tool should also be used to run the system through functional tests.
    1. Clean the top of the master cylinder, remove the cover and fill the reservoirs with clean fluid. To prevent squirting fluid, and possibly damaging painted surfaces, install the cover during the procedure, but be sure to frequently check and top off the reservoirs with fresh fluid.
    CAUTION Never reuse brake fluid which has been bled from the system.
    1. The master cylinder must be bled first if it is suspected to contain air. If the master cylinder was removed and bench bled before installation it must still be bled, but it should take less time and effort. Bleed the master cylinder as follows:
      1. Position a container under the master cylinder to catch the brake fluid.
    WARNING Do not allow brake fluid to spill on or come in contact with the vehicle's finish as it will remove the paint. In case of a spill, immediately flush the area with water.
      1. Loosen the front brake line at the master cylinder and allow the fluid to flow from the front port.
      2. Have a friend depress the brake pedal slowly and hold (air and/or fluid should be expelled from the loose fitting). Tighten the line, then release the brake pedal and wait 15 seconds. Loosen the fitting and repeat until all air is removed from the master cylinder bore.
      3. When finished, tighten the line fitting to 20 ft. lbs. (5 Nm).
      4. Repeat the sequence at the master cylinder rear pipe fitting.
    During the bleeding procedure, make sure your assistant does NOT release the brake pedal while a fitting is loosened or while a bleeder screw is opening. Air will be drawn back into the system.
    1. Check and refill the master cylinder reservoir.
    Remember, if the reservoir is allowed to empty of fluid during the procedure, air will be drawn into the system and the bleeding procedure must be restarted at the master cylinder assembly.
    1. On late model ABS equipped vehicles, perform the special ABS procedures as described later in this section. On 4 wheel ABS systems the Brake Pressure Modulator Valve (BPMV) must be bled (if it has been replaced or if it is suspected to contain air) and on most Rear Wheel Anti-Lock (RWAL) systems the combination valve must be held open. In both cases, special combination valve depressor tools should be used during bleeding and a scan tool must be used for ABS function tests.
    1. If a single line or fitting was the only hydraulic line disconnected, then only the caliper(s) or wheel cylinder(s) affected by that line must be bled. If the master cylinder required bleeding, then all calipers and wheel cylinders must be bled in the proper sequence:
      1. Right rear
      2. Left rear
      3. Right front
      4. Left front
    2. Bleed the individual calipers or wheel cylinders as follows:
      1. Place a suitable wrench over the bleeder screw and attach a clear plastic hose over the screw end. Be sure the hose is seated snugly on the screw or you may be squirted with brake fluid.
    Be very careful when bleeding wheel cylinders and brake calipers. The bleeder screws often rust in position and may easily break off if forced. Installing a new bleeder screw will often require removal of the component and may include overhaul or replacement of the wheel cylinder/caliper. To help prevent the possibility of breaking a bleeder screw, spray it with some penetrating oil before attempting to loosen it.
      1. Submerge the other end of the tube in a transparent container of clean brake fluid.
      2. Loosen the bleed screw, then have a friend apply the brake pedal slowly and hold. Tighten the bleed screw to 62 inch lbs. (7 Nm), release the brake pedal and wait 15 seconds. Repeat the sequence (including the 15 second pause) until all air is expelled from the caliper or cylinder.
      3. Tighten the bleeder screw to 62 inch lbs. (7 Nm) when finished.
    1. Check the pedal for a hard feeling with the engine not running. If the pedal is soft, repeat the bleeding procedure until a firm pedal is obtained.
    2. If the brake warning light is on, depress the brake pedal firmly. If there is no air in the system, the light will go out.
    3. After bleeding, make sure that a firm pedal is achieved before attempting to move the vehicle.

    Hope helps (remember to rate this answer).

    Apr 13, 2011 | 1987 GMC Jimmy

    2 Answers

    How do I bleed my brake lines on a 1999 Oldsmobile Bravada


    This job is a lot easier with two people but you can do it with 1 if you have to. Have someone sit inside and pump the brakes 3 or 4 times and on the 4th pump hold it to the floor(all the way to the floor and don't let up at all). While they hold it to the floor you take a little end wrench and (Starting on driver side front going to pass. front next then pass. back and so on) you should already have the tire off before pumping brakes. On the caliper(the thing that holds the pads) there is a little bleeder nut Should be near where your brake line goes into the caliper. Now while they hold the pedal down you loosen that nut just a little bit and it should spit a little bit then maybe some fluid will come out maybe not on the first time but it does happen. Just dont leave it open longer than a couple seconds. Just long enough for air to escape then tighten back down. Repeat all those steps about 4 or 5 times for each tire or until brake pedal feels hard to push in. Make sure while your bleeding that you check your master cylinder often if you let it run out u will have to start over from the beginning. Also make sure who ever is holding the pedal do not let up when bleeder valve is open. Same thing. I just wantedn to m

    Jan 09, 2011 | Oldsmobile Bravada Cars & Trucks

    2 Answers

    Blew a brake line in back then fixed the line but still no back brakes


    Loosen the bleed screw and and pump the brakes until straight brake fluid comes out. Make sure you get the air all out or it will just keep happening. Make sure to top up brake fluid after as well.

    Jan 01, 2011 | Chevrolet 1500 Cars & Trucks

    1 Answer

    How to bleed brakes on 1997 Saturn


    The brake system bleeding procedure differs for ABS and non-ABS vehicles. The following procedure pertains only to non-ABS vehicles. For details on bleeding ABS equipped vehicles, refer to the ABS procedures later in this section.

    WARNING Make sure the master cylinder contains clean DOT 3 brake fluid at all times during the procedure.
    1. The master cylinder must be bled first if it is suspected of containing air. Bleed the master cylinder as follows:
      1. Position a container under the master cylinder to catch the brake fluid.
      2. Loosen the left front brake line (front upper port) at the master cylinder and allow the fluid to flow from the front port.
      3. Connect the line and tighten to 24 ft. lbs. (32 Nm).
      4. Have an assistant depress the brake pedal slowly one time and hold it down, while you loosen the front line to expel air from the master cylinder. Tighten the line, then release the brake pedal. Repeat until all air is removed from the master cylinder.
      5. Tighten the brake line to 24 ft. lbs. (32 Nm) when finished.
      6. Repeat these steps for the right front brake line (rear upper port) at the master cylinder.
    WARNING Do not allow brake fluid to spill on or come in contact with the vehicle' finish, as it will remove the paint. In case of a spill, immediately flush the area with water.
    1. If a single line or fitting was the only hydraulic line disconnected, then only the caliper(s) or wheel cylinder(s) affected by that line must be bled. If the master cylinder required bleeding, then all calipers and wheel cylinders must be bled in the proper sequence:
      1. Right rear
      2. Left front
      3. Left rear
      4. Right front
    2. Bleed the individual calipers or wheel cylinders as follows:
      1. Place a suitable wrench over the bleeder screw and attach a clear plastic hose over the screw end.
      2. Submerge the other end in a transparent container of brake fluid.
      3. Loosen the bleed screw, then have an assistant apply the brake pedal slowly and hold it down. Close the bleed screw, then release the brake pedal. Repeat the sequence until all air is expelled from the caliper or cylinder.
      4. When finished, tighten the bleed screw to 97 inch lbs. (11 Nm) for the front, or 66 inch lbs. (7.5 Nm) for the rear.
    3. Check the pedal for a hard feeling with the engine not running. If the pedal is soft, repeat the bleeding procedure until a firm pedal is obtained.
    zjlimited_349.jpg

    Fig. 1: Loosen the front brake line in order to bleed the master cylinder

    zjlimited_350.jpg

    Fig. 2: Connect a bleed hose from the bleed valve on the front caliper to a jar of brake fluid

    zjlimited_351.jpg

    Fig. 3: Always follow the lettered sequence when bleeding the hydraulic brake system





    Hope this helps to solve it; remember to rate this answer.

    Dec 29, 2010 | 1997 Saturn SL

    1 Answer

    If I remove a break line from one caliper for replacement, do I need to bleed the breaks on all four wheels or only the one that I have replaced the break line on?


    When replacing any brake components it's always a great idea to bleed the brakes. Because your life depends on the serviceability of your brake system. When you open, crack or brake any line in your brake system, you automaticity introduce air into the system. Air can be compressed easily as opposed to brake fluid, which is designed not to compress as well as resist heat. The air in your system will cause your ABS and sensors to malfunction and or not work at all. When bleeding your brake system use this sequence start with: 1)right rear, 2)left rear, 3)front right, 4)front left. All vehicle parts and locations are referred to as the vehicle's left and right sides. Or as your setting in the drivers seat. Hope that helps.

    Dec 21, 2010 | 2001 Lexus RX 300

    1 Answer

    Brake fluid leaking from ABS distribution block


    You have to replace the master cylinder because the fluid that leaks from it is getting into the brake booster and compromising the seals. So you can probably get away with the booster and cylinder. Unless the ABS unit is a part of the either of the affected parts, or isn't working properly, you can leave it alone. ---------------------
    A fluid-distribution system includes a plurality of fluid-distribution nodes with three-way ports attached to bleed/flush lines and alternate ports attached to vacuum lines. A first pump is used to draw new brake fluid from a new fluid container, push it through the manifold and ports, and through the bleed/flush lines. Fluid flow through the ports is selectively controlled by a computing device. In this manner, a vehicle's brake system including individual brake lines and ABS systems, may be flushed in a prescribed sequence. The vacuum lines are connected to a second pump via alternate ports of the sequential control valve manifold and may be used evacuated air and contaminated brake fluid from the vehicle's bleeder valves or master cylinder. Additionally, the bleed/flush lines may be connected to the alternate ports during priming or purging of the system. This also facilitates storage of the bleed lines as it prevents brake fluid from spilling and prevents air from entering the system. thanks.

    Jul 11, 2009 | 2000 Mercury Cougar

    2 Answers

    Cant bleed out brakes


    It takes time, do you know the sequence to bleed the brakes? Most cars r different. And you have to keep pouring brake fluid, That is a two person job. Make sure all lines r connected to MC and not leaking. After a while if nothing comes out MC could be diffective.

    Jun 06, 2009 | 1990 Toyota 4Runner

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