Question about 2002 Ford Explorer

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Rubber ring on the front wheel springs or shocks broke is this important can i still drive it

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I quess you mean rubber ring under front spring.
I would pull the spring/strut and replace whatever it needs.
It will effect ride height to some extent,thus alignment,and could causes issues with wear,noise,etc,to the spring seat. You could drive it for a few days,until you find a shop, you want to repair it.
On an 8 year old veh,you may as well just install new struts,as well as new spring rubbers or now they have complete assemblies ready to go in.

Posted on Sep 10, 2010

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How to adjust trunk on a1996 volvo 850


Since I don't know if you have replaced that shock or have replaced both, I will cover as many instances as I can here. Let me know of any other details including work that's already been done (and the parts that got used).

1) If you have replaced the damaged shock assembly, ensure that its mount inside the trunk under the carpet where the wheel well is located is properly installed. There are two bolts that secure it in place.
2) If that appears OK then it's possible that during the failure of the shock the mounting to the body could be distorted. Have that checked at a properly-equipped shop.
3) If you are sure that the body itself is intact, ensure the shock receiver cup hasn't buckled. This is simply a bracket with a rubber bushing where the shock rests near the stub axle.
4) Compare the length of both shocks with the vehicle on a lift with at least the two rear wheels at full droop. Then do the same with the vehicle parked on level ground. Ensure that the values you find for each test do not exceed +-1-3 mm.
5) If you find a difference, it's possible that the other shock is failing as well. Shocks are usually replaced in pairs, optionally with their springs. During your failure, the spring on the failed shock could have compressed to the point of fatigue failure. It cannot be adjusted; it must be replaced. Do not attempt to compensate by shaving the other spring; this will leave the spring with fatigue cracks where it was trimmed and will fail quickly, possibly resulting in severe damage to the body.
6) Once all this has been done, have the vehicle geometry checked out by a properly-equipped shop. The easiest way is to have a four-wheel alignment done and see if the rear wheels show any difference; if the difference cannot be adjusted out then there is either frame damage or body damage present. In either instance, the repair is minimal.

Dec 22, 2014 | 1996 Volvo 850

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Shocks and struts


When it comes to shocks and suspension, many people are confused as to what the shocks on their vehicle do. The job of the shock is to slow down and damp the movement of the body on the wheel. The real function of shock absorbers are to: 1) Prevent bottoming, that is slowing down the compression of the spring and create lifting force on the wheel.
2}Prevent the tires from bouncing up and down on bumps and absorb some of the energy.
3)Keep the vehicle from bouncing up and down on the springs before settling down.
I’ve put together a few simple tests you can do even if you have no mechanical knowledge about your Lexus at all. The same principle applies for strut suspension.
1}Push your weight down on the front or rear of your Lexus and release .The vehicle should bounce up and settle down. If it continues to bounce the shocks are worn out.
2)Drive over a small bump at a speed of 20 mph and the wheel should lift to it and settle down without a thud.(the thud is the rubber snubber)
3)At 60 mph the vehicle should rise and fall quickly over a dip, then stabilize itself after 2 rebounds..If it does not the vehicle will feel like it is floating and this makes the steering very unstable.
4)On rough roads does your vehicle shake and vibrate after you go a short distance? Well if it does, it is because the oil in the shock is overheating and starting to foam. That problem can be corrected with a nitrogen gas shock.
5)The last is to look at the shock or strut and see if it is leaking oil, if so it has no compression or rebound.
If your Lexus failed any of these tests either the shocks are worn out are mismatched for your vehicle. Some of the best shocks and struts on the market are Bilstein’s Monroe, and KYBs . And remember that maintaining the shocks and or struts on your Lexus is very important to the handling and tire wear on any Lexus.
This is a very good link for more suspension information

on Dec 13, 2009 | Toyota Sequoia Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

When I back out of my driveway turning the steering wheel left, I hear a clunk or thud that seems to be coming from the right back area as I'm straightening out. I'm concerened that this may be a...


I would get a second opinion to compare physical inspection results. The wheel bearing is most urgent, as are control arm bushings.

Sound can transmit from one end of the car to the other, but the noise was heard in the rear and the balljoints are in the front.

The sway bar and its' bushings can make a noise. You will get body lean on turns with worn components, and some rear drive models have links which can break and detach.

You need to identify the Car Brand and model so the Experts know what you may have for components.

As you may have noticed, I have not said much about shocks. If you have shocks and not struts, there are different priorities. If either is leaking, the priority increases. Some strut towers have a bearing ring and when worn out, can be a safety issue. Shocks fit inside control arms and do not have a bearing ring. Rear suspensions vary, some use control arms on multilink types, others use a rear axle with springs.

But get the wheel bearing fixed. Have tierod ends checked. The guy under the car will have a better idea of its physical condition than what we can tell online.


T

Oct 04, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My Front left tire is tilted inward and underneath the truck i found one of the support bars that run's across is broken off on the left side. I looked around the wheel and found that no metal was bent so...


General Description
The front suspension allows each wheel to compensate for changes in the road surface without affecting the opposite wheel. Each wheel independently connects to the frame with a steering knuckle, ball joint assemblies, and upper and lower control arms.
The control arms specifically allow the steering knuckles to move in a three-dimensional arc. Two tie rods connect to steering arms on the knuckles and an intermediate rod. These operate the front wheels.
The two-wheel drive vehicles have coil chassis springs. These springs are mounted between the spring housings on the frame and the lower control arms. Double, direct acting shock absorbers are inside the coil springs. The coil springs attach to the lower control arms and offer ride control.
The upper part of each shock absorber extends through the upper control arm frame bracket. This bracket has two grommets, two grommet retainers, and a nut.
A spring stabilizer shaft controls the side roll of the front suspension. This shaft is mounted in rubber bushings that are held by brackets to the frame side rails. The ends of the stabilizer shaft connect to the lower control arms with link bolts. Rubber grommets isolate these link bolts. Rubber bushings attach the upper control arm to a cross shaft. Frame brackets bolt the cross shaft.
A ball joint assembly is riveted to the outer end of the upper control arm. A rubber spring in the control arm assures that the ball seats properly in the socket. A castellated nut and a cotter pin join the steering knuckle to the upper ball joint.
The inner ends of the lower control arm have pressed-in bushings. The bolts pass through the bushings and join the arm to the frame. The lower ball joint assembly is a press fit in the lower control arm and attaches to the steering knuckle with a castellated nut and a cotter pin.
Ball socket assemblies have rubber grease seals. These seals prevent entry of moisture and dirt and damage to the bearing surfaces.
Four-wheel drive models have a front suspension that consists of the control arms, a stabilizer bar, a shock absorber, and right and left torsion bars. The torsion bars replace the conventional coil springs. The lower control arm attaches to the front end of the torsion bar. The rear end of the torsion bar mounts on an adjustable arm at the crossmember. This arm adjustment controls the vehicle trim height.
Two-wheel drive vehicles have tapered roller sheel bearings. These bearings are adjustible and need lubrication.
Four-wheel drive models and RWD Utilities have sealed front-wheel bearings. These bearings are pre-adjusted and need no lubrication.
Heat treatment may create darkened areas on the bearing assembly. This discoloration does not signal a need for replacement.
Hope this helps?

Jun 27, 2017 | 1999 Chevrolet S-10 Pickup

1 Answer

My steering goes mad when driving on rough roads, mostly on left side. a bit like driving a jelly. could this be the springs?


It is unlikely to be the springs but more likely to be the ancillary suspension components such as the shock absorbers (suspension dampers) and either tired or worn rubber bushings on the the anti-roll (anti-sway) bar and control arms. Some cars are fitted with a steering damper arm and if this loses its damping effectiveness the steering will shimmy about. Bounce on each corner of the front of the car. The body should rebound and come to rest within one and half cycles. If the car continues to bounce the shocks need replacing. Lift the front of the car and remove the front wheels. Inspect the rubber bushings of control arms and shock absorber mounts for wear and annular cracks. Use a pry bar to apply force in order to detect for undue play in linkages and control arms. Check for play in the steering control arms ball joints and in the steering rack itself, including the mounting bolts. Everything should be tight and firm. Anything obviously loose and/or worn should be replaced.

Sep 08, 2010 | 1997 Mazda MX-5 Miata

1 Answer

How to replace front shock bsorbers


This is for the 2WD model:

2-Wheel Drive
  1. Raise and support the front of the vehicle safely using jack stands.
  2. Using an open end wrench, hold the shock absorber upper stem to prevent it from turning, then remove the upper stem retaining nut, the retainer and rubber grommet.
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Common front shock absorber mounting-2WD vehicles

  1. Remove the shock absorber-to-lower control arm retaining bolts and lower the shock absorber assembly from the bottom of the control arm.
  2. Inspect and test the shock absorber; replace it, if necessary.
To install:
  1. Fully extend the shock absorber stem, then push it up through the lower control arm and spring so that the upper stem passes through the mounting hole in the upper control arm frame bracket.
  2. Install the upper shock absorber nut and tighten to 100 inch. lbs. (11 Nm) on 1994 models 145 inch lbs. (16 Nm) on 1995 models, 54 ft. lbs. (73 Nm) on 1996 models, or 106 inch lbs. (12 Nm) on 1997-99 models while holding the stem with an open end wrench. Be careful not to crush the rubber bushing.
  3. Install the shock absorber-to-lower control arm retaining bolts and tighten to 20 ft. lbs. (27 Nm) on 1994-95 models and 54 ft. lbs. (73 Nm) on 1996 models, or 22 ft. lbs. (30 Nm) on 1997-99 models.
  4. Remove the jack stands and carefully lower the vehicle.

Nov 01, 2009 | 1998 Chevrolet S-10 Pickup

1 Answer

I need shocks, they have never been replaced in 107K miles. Does this car have 4 shocks or 2 shocks and 2 struts


Thr front will be MacPherson struts, a shock absorber surrounded by a coil spring looking set-up.


FOR THE REAR:
If you have front wheel drive and you have Electronic Ride Control (ERC), then the rear suspension has "super lift air shocks".

If you have all wheel drive, then you have struts in the rear suspension.

Does help any?

Oct 26, 2009 | 1993 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera

1 Answer

Front end sqeek and grinding sound .goes away when i jack up the car check everything looks fine and tight but comes back in a few days thought it might be the shocks?


shocks wouldntt grind, grinding sound usually is the front wheel drive at wheels, check rubber boots for tears,remove front wheels, inspect gears.plz rate -bozcro

Sep 16, 2009 | 2001 Chrysler Sebring

1 Answer

2006 bmw 116i


if it is scraping on the shock chances are that 1 the camber of your right front is way off this could be due to a damaged strut/shock/coil spring assembly are the allignment is way off. one of the first things you do is when you take it to a shop have them show you exactly what is wrong. don't allow them to tell you you need replacement of parts unless they give you a detailed answer and they show you why it needs replacing. On your vehicle you have front wheel drive so the suspension is as follows strut is responsible for keeping the wheels on the ground it also can be adjusted to keep the wheel tilted in or out on the top or bottom this is called camber. you have a coil spring that is intergrated with the shock this is called a strut there is a distinction between just a shock which has no coil spring. this spring keeps the body off the axle this is the only purpose it serves. tie rods are what are attached to your rack and pinion unit this is what steers the wheels. they adjust the wheels at the front or back of the wheel this is called toe in/out if you have wishbones upper and lower there also should be a stablizer bar between the 2 also known as a torsion bar. this is used to add stablization to the whole assembly. you have a front wheel drive vehicle and the axles are also called cv jointed axles thes e have no bearing on your wheel rubbing the strut because they are in a fixed position and cannot be adjusted. thr front rotor assembly does have a sealed bearing however unless you have a severe wobble your hub assembly is not the problem. if the wheel is rubbing the strut either the wheel is toed in to far due to an improper adjustment of the tie rod end or the camber is off due to a bent strut or poor allignment. my suggestion is to take it to a small independant shop and have them do the repair you will save money on parts and labor you will get a good job done and most important if they are a crediable shop they will not try to fleece your pofckets they will explain in detail what the problem is and how to fix it they will show you exactly what is to be done. please rate this thanks

Oct 07, 2008 | 2006 BMW 1 Series

1 Answer

Shocks or struts for front driver & passanger


The front has struts and the rear has shocks. I used Volvo OEMs. The rears are VERY easy to do yourself. The upper mounts are located behind the rear doors in the trunk area. It takes 15 minutes each to replace the rears.

The fronts are not difficult to remove if you have an air wrench + 6 sided socket, and a special star socket (14mm I think). You can find detailed instructions online. Once the front struts are out of the vehicle, you'll need to compress the springs before taking them apart. I did one myself using loaner spring compressors from Advanced Auto. I brought the second one into my local muffler shop because they have an industrial spring compressor. Make sure that you have a ride available to the nearest Volvo Parts dealer because once you get the struts apart, you'll probably need to replace the rubber bearing assembly in the strut that rotates when the wheel turns. There is also a rubber sleve that surrounds the strut to keep dirt out. The metal mount for his corrodes. The struts are a very important part of your steering, so if you do the fronts use care. Also, be aware that you'll probably be purchasing alot more parts than just the piston for the fronts. Suggest that you price it all out before proceeding.

Jul 30, 2008 | 2000 Volvo S80

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