Question about 1995 Toyota Camry

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Radiator appears to be overheating.The fluid level is good in the radiator. The car has oil. The car runs great-minus the steam, smoke whatever I notice at the radiator when I raised the hood. The temp gauge inside the car is normal. I do have a check engine light that has been on forever and then goes off. It is on now though, but have been told that this is a quite common issue with Camrys. I have been told my hoses look fine and are not leaking. Any ideas?

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  • ldnelson Sep 07, 2010

    I see a wear crack in the top of my radiator that is visible when the car is running. Fluid is leaking out which explains the steam /smoke etc. It is a pretty long crack so I am getting a new radiator to be on the safe side.

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Try repalcing the radiator cap probably the gasket has gone bad very common problem for vehicles. if that doesnt work do a pressure check on the radiator. hop this helps you.

Posted on Sep 07, 2010

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