Question about 2000 Volkswagen Beetle

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I replaces brakes and needed to add fluid to master cylinder, when i did i pulled off a small hose that went to air regulater and check engine lite came on. i found where hose went and put it back on but check engine lite is still on, if i disconnect the battery wil it reset the system.

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  • Volkswagen Master
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One can try to disconnect the battery to erase the code, but on later model cars, one needs an OBD-II scanner to erase codes (from 1996 on up).

On older OBD-I type cars disconnecting the battery for 30 sec. used to erase codes.

Posted on Sep 03, 2010

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I have an 01 GMC Jimmy 4.3L 4WD & we are trying to bleed the brakes but the scanner says my vehicle is going 3MPH so we manually bleed the brakes but the pedals still easily is pushed to the floor.


Bad master cylinder . What are you using a scan tool for ? No need Unless your Installing a new Electro-Hydraulic Control Unit (EHCU) or new Brake Pressure Modulator Valve (BPMV).
Hydraulic Brake System Bleeding (Manual)
Caution: Refer to Brake Fluid Irritant Caution in the Preface section.
Notice: Refer to Brake Fluid Effects on Paint and Electrical Components Notice in the Preface section.
Place a clean shop cloth beneath the brake master cylinder to prevent brake fluid spills.
With the ignition OFF and the brakes cool, apply the brakes 3-5 times, or until the brake pedal effort increases significantly, in order to deplete the brake booster power reserve.
If you have performed a brake master cylinder bench bleeding on this vehicle, or if you disconnected the brake pipes from the master cylinder, you must perform the following steps:
3.1. Ensure that the brake master cylinder reservoir is full to the maximum-fill level. If necessary add GM approved brake fluid from a clean, sealed brake fluid container. Refer to Fluid and Lubricant Recommendations.
If removal of the reservoir cap and diaphragm is necessary, clean the outside of the reservoir on and around the cap prior to removal.
3.2. With the rear brake pipe installed securely to the master cylinder, loosen and separate the front brake pipe from the front port of the brake master cylinder.
3.3. Allow a small amount of brake fluid to gravity bleed from the open port of the master cylinder.
3.4. Reconnect the brake pipe to the master cylinder port and tighten securely.
3.5. Have an assistant slowly depress the brake pedal fully and maintain steady pressure on the pedal.
3.6. Loosen the same brake pipe to purge air from the open port of the master cylinder.
3.7. Tighten the brake pipe, then have the assistant slowly release the brake pedal.
3.8. Wait 15 seconds, then repeat steps 3.3-3.7 until all air is purged from the same port of the master cylinder.
3.9. With the front brake pipe installed securely to the master cylinder, after all air has been purged from the front port of the master cylinder, loosen and separate the rear brake pipe from the master cylinder, then repeat steps 3.3-3.8.
3.10. After completing the final master cylinder port bleeding procedure, ensure that both of the brake pipe-to-master cylinder fittings are properly tightened.
Fill the brake master cylinder reservoir with GM approved brake fluid from a clean, sealed brake fluid container. Ensure that the brake master cylinder reservoir remains at least half-full during this bleeding procedure. Add fluid as needed to maintain the proper level.
Clean the outside of the reservoir on and around the reservoir cap prior to removing the cap and diaphragm.
Install a proper box-end wrench onto the RIGHT REAR wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve.
Install a transparent hose over the end of the bleeder valve.
Submerge the open end of the transparent hose into a transparent container partially filled with GM approved brake fluid from a clean, sealed brake fluid container.
Have an assistant slowly depress the brake pedal fully and maintain steady pressure on the pedal.
Loosen the bleeder valve to purge air from the wheel hydraulic circuit.
Tighten the bleeder valve, then have the assistant slowly release the brake pedal.
Wait 15 seconds, then repeat steps 8-10 until all air is purged from the same wheel hydraulic circuit.
With the right rear wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve tightened securely, after all air has been purged from the right rear hydraulic circuit install a proper box-end wrench onto the LEFT REAR wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve.
Install a transparent hose over the end of the bleeder valve, then repeat steps 7-11.
With the left rear wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve tightened securely, after all air purged from the left rear hydraulic circuit, install a proper box-end wrench onto the RIGHT FRONT wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve.
Install a transparent hose over the end of the bleeder valve, then repeat steps 7-11.
With the right front wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve tightened securely, after all air has been purged from the right front hydraulic circuit, install a proper box-end wrench onto the LEFT FRONT wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve.
Install a transparent hose over the end of the bleeder valve, then repeat steps 7-11.
After completing the final wheel hydraulic circuit bleeding procedure, ensure that each of the 4 wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valves are properly tightened.
Fill the brake master cylinder reservoir to the maximum-fill level with GM approved brake fluid from a clean, sealed brake fluid container.
Slowly depress and release the brake pedal. Observe the feel of the brake pedal.
If the brake pedal feels spongy, repeat the bleeding procedure again. If the brake pedal still feels spongy after repeating the bleeding procedure, perform the following steps:
21.1. Inspect the brake system for external leaks. Refer to Brake System External Leak Inspection.
21.2. Pressure bleed the hydraulic brake system in order to purge any air that may still be trapped in the system.
Turn the ignition key ON, with the engine OFF. Check to see if the brake system warning lamp remains illuminated.
Important: If the brake system warning lamp remains illuminated, DO NOT allow the vehicle to be driven until it is diagnosed and repaired.
If the brake system warning lamp remains illuminated, refer to Symptoms - Hydraulic Brakes

Feb 26, 2017 | GMC Cars & Trucks

4 Answers

I have no brakes


When you say that the first master cylinder had no pedal, did that just suddenly happen?

A master cylinder has rubber seals inside - think of a bicycle pump - when the bicycle pump seal wears it becomes difficult to pressurise it. The same is true of a master cylinder.
A classic sign of a master cylinder with worn or perished seals is that it needs pumping a few times to pressurise but there is no leakage of brake fluid.

Prior to you changing the master cylinder had the level of the brake fluid dropped .. indicating a leak somewhere? Had you done any work on the brake pads/rotors?

Eliminate other causes of air getting into the braking system:

First thing to do is check the flexible brake hoses on each wheel. Get a friend to pump - and hold - the brake pedal while you inspect the flexible hoses. Check for leaks (obviously) but also look to see if each flexible hose 'bulges' anywhere along its length.

25932867-jil1jjwvkur0lkeilf3pe4be-4-0.jpeg Also check each flexible hose to see if it is perished or wet with fluid. 25932867-jil1jjwvkur0lkeilf3pe4be-4-1.jpeg A perished flexible hose can draw in air and cause no pedal/spongy pedal. The same is true with a flexible hose that bulges/balloons when under pressure.

It only takes a slight 'weeping' from a flexi hose or rigid pipe connection to allow air into the system. Check the rigid brake pipes too - especially where there is a connector/join.

Then remove the road wheels and look for the slightest fluid leak around caliper pistons.

The problem, I think, comes back to the original fault .. no pedal when your car had sat overnight. This is rather indicative of air getting into the system somewhere though not necessarily from the master cylinder.

Check for the slightest leak in the entire braking system. It only takes a small amount of air to get in and cause problems. The fact that you fitted a second master cylinder makes me think the problem could lie elsewhere.

Try bleeding the braking system. It's a 2 man job, but quite easy.
Here's a link that explains how to do it:
How to Bleed Your Brakes

Good luck!

Oct 30, 2015 | 1988 Plymouth Reliant

2 Answers

2000 mercury cougar.....no brake paddle we replaced master cly,booster......what can it be


did you bleed all of the air from the master cylinder before you installed it, this has to be done. also when replacing the master cylinder, all 4 wheel cylinders will have to be bled, in order to get all of the air out of them. while doing the wheel cylinder bleeding , you will have to make sure that the master cylinder doe's not run out of brake fluid, check it each time you bleed a wheel cylinder , add brake fluid to the master cylinder each time or when it is getting low. hope that this has helped you.

Apr 16, 2011 | 2000 Mercury Cougar

2 Answers

Brake pedal go all the way to the floor


Check for brake leaks. Make sure that the resevore is full. With the engine off pump the brakes then check for leaks. If there is no leaks then bleed the brakes start with the right rear and work clock wise around the truck. If there is no air that comes out of the lines and the fluid looks clean your master cylinder went bad and it is a easy replacement. To replace the master cylinder you'll need a 14 mm for the lines and a 15 mm for the booster. Thanks!

Mar 07, 2011 | 1997 GMC Sierra

2 Answers

No Brakes, changed Booster, thought it was air in the lines. When bleeding no fluid coming out of front right and back brake bleeder valves. Checked rubber line, is ok. Clogged somewhere in the line. Have...


Is the master cylinder good? a bad master can cause this also did you bleed the master first before bleeding at the wheel and also make sure the bleeder screw is clean, if the hose is good then theres only a few things, a bad master or a master that wasnt bleed, try bleeding the master first then try rebleeding the brakes.

Mar 01, 2011 | 1983 Ford Thunderbird

1 Answer

How do i bleed the brakes on a 1999 Pontiac Grand Am?


Bleeding the Brake System
When any part of the hydraulic system has been disconnected for repair or
replacement, air may get into the lines and cause spongy pedal action (because
air can be compressed and brake fluid cannot). To correct this condition, it is
necessary to bleed the hydraulic system so to be sure all air is purged.

When bleeding the brake system, bleed one brake cylinder at a time, beginning
at the cylinder with the longest hydraulic line (farthest from the master
cylinder) first. ALWAYS Keep the master cylinder reservoir filled with brake
fluid during the bleeding operation. Never use brake fluid that has been drained
from the hydraulic system, no matter how clean it is.

The primary and secondary hydraulic brake systems are separate and are bled
independently. During the bleeding operation, do not allow the reservoir to run
dry. Keep the master cylinder reservoir filled with brake fluid.


  1. Clean all dirt from around the master cylinder fill cap, remove the cap and
    fill the master cylinder with brake fluid until the level is within 1/4 I n.
    (6mm) of the top edge of the reservoir.
  2. Clean the bleeder screws at all 4 wheels. The bleeder screws are located on
    the top of the brake calipers.
  3. Attach a length of rubber hose over the bleeder screw and place the other
    end of the hose in a glass jar, submerged in brake fluid.
  4. Starting at the right rear proceed in this order left front, left rear and
    right front.
  5. Open the bleeder screw 1/2 - 3/4 turn. Have an assistant slowly depress the
    brake pedal.
  6. Close the bleeder screw and tell your assistant to allow the brake pedal to
    return slowly. Continue this process to purge all air from the system.
  7. When bubbles cease to appear at the end of the bleeder hose, close the
    bleeder screw and remove the hose.
  8. Check the master cylinder fluid level and add fluid accordingly. Do this
    after bleeding each wheel.
  9. Fill the master cylinder reservoir to the proper level.


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Sep 21, 2010 | 1999 Pontiac Grand Am GT

5 Answers

Brake pedal is hard but brakes not very effective. booster holds vacuum. replaced booster check valve, no change. dash brake light stays on most of time but sometimes goes out for a while then comes back...


Check the brake fluid first.is it low or no brake fluid at all.is the brake fluid got dried up or leaked out. Sounds like the power brake booster is bad, that is what the master cylinder is bolted too. There is a rubber hose that has a plastic valve in it were it snaps into the booster, Pull that rubber hose out of the booster and off of the engine, Now the end that you took off the engine. You should be able to **** through the line, but not be able to blow through it. If you can then replace the valve, It is a one way valve.
If that is all right then hook hose back up to the engine and start engine, You should hear a major vacuum leak at the valve end, put you finger over the valve and it should stop making noise and engine should smooth out. If it don't the rubber hose must be leaking or the tube on the engine were the hose hooks to is stoped up.
Also check the master cylinder if power booster is replaced. If the brake light is coming and going check the brake light switch. check fig for the internal assembly parts:-- bdea807.gif

To check engine vacuum, connect a vacuum gauge to the supply hose that runs from the intake manifold to the booster. A low reading (below 16 inches) may indicate a hose leak or obstruction, a blockage in the exhaust system (plugged catalytic converter, crushed pipe, bad muffler, etc.), or a problem in the engine itself (manifold vacuum leak, bad valve, head gasket, etc.).
The condition of the diaphragm inside the booster is also important. If cracked, ruptured or leaking, it won't hold vacuum and can't provide much power assist. Leaks in the master cylinder can allow brake fluid to be siphoned into the booster, accelerating the demise of the diaphragm. So if there's brake fluid inside the vacuum hose, it's a good indication the master cylinder is leaking and needs to be rebuilt or replaced. Wetness around the back of the master cylinder would be another clue to this kind of problem.
To check the vacuum booster, pump the brake pedal with the engine off until you've bled off all the vacuum from the unit. Then hold the pedal down and start the engine. You should feel the pedal depress slightly as engine vacuum enters the booster and pulls on the diaphragm. No change? Then check the vacuum hose connection and engine vacuum. If okay, the problem is in the booster and the booster needs to be replaced.
Vacuum boosters also have an external one-way check valve at the hose inlet that closes when the engine is either shut off or stalls. This traps vacuum inside the booster so it can still provide one or two power assisted stops until the engine is restarted. The valve also helps maintain vacuum when intake vacuum is low (when the engine is under load or is running at wide open throttle). You can check the valve by removing it and trying to blow through it from both sides. It should pass air from the rear but not from the front.
Replacing a vacuum booster is a fairly straight forward job. All you have to do is disconnect it from the brake pedal on the inside and unbolt the master cylinder. The pushrod that runs from the booster into the back of the master cylinder must have the specified amount of play.
You will typically find the power brake booster mounted on the firewall attached to the master cylinder. The master cylinder is connected to the brake pedal.
Thanks. keep updated for any more query.you can rate this solution and show your appreciation.

Jul 15, 2010 | 1997 Ford F250 SuperCab

1 Answer

What is the sequence to bleed the brakes on a 1994 Chevy Suburban?


Bleeding the Brakes
EXCEPT HYDRO-BOOST OR ABS(see Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4)
To bleed the brakes on a vehicle equipped with ABS, please refer to the ABS bleeding procedure in this section.
The brake system must be bled when any brake line is disconnected or there is air in the system.
Never bleed a wheel cylinder when a drum is removed.
  1. Clean the master cylinder of excess dirt and remove the cylinder cover and the diaphragm.
  2. Fill the master cylinder to the proper level. Check the fluid level periodically during the bleeding process and replenish it as necessary. Do not allow the master cylinder to run dry, or you will have to start over.
  3. Before opening any of the bleeder screws, you may want to give each one a shot of penetrating solvent. This reduces the possibility of breakage when they are unscrewed.
97e350f.jpg

Fig. 1: Connect one end of a clear plastic tube to the bleeder screw and submerge the other end in clean brake fluid

506ad18.jpg

Fig. 2: Have an assistant pump, then hold in the brake pedal, while you bleed each wheel

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Fig. 3: Using the combination valve depressor-R/V Series

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Fig. 4: Using the combination valve depressor-C/K Series
  1. Attach a length of vinyl hose to the bleeder screw of the brake to be bled. Insert the other end of the hose into a clear jar half full of clean brake fluid, so that the end of the hose is beneath the level of fluid. The correct sequence for bleeding is to work from the brake farthest from the master cylinder to the one closest; right rear, left rear, right front, left front.
  2. The combination valve must be held open during the bleeding process. A clip, tape, or other similar tool (or an assistant) will hold the metering pin in.
  3. Depress and release the brake pedal three or four times to exhaust any residual vacuum.
  4. Have an assistant push down on the brake pedal and hold it down. Open the bleeder valve slightly. As the pedal reaches the end of its travel, close the bleeder screw and release the brake pedal. Repeat this process until no air bubbles are visible in the expelled fluid.
Make sure your assistant presses the brake pedal to the floor slowly. Pressing too fast will cause air bubbles to form in the fluid.
  1. Repeat this procedure at each of the brakes. Remember to check the master cylinder level occasionally. Use only fresh fluid to refill the master cylinder, not the stuff bled from the system.
  2. When the bleeding process is complete, refill the master cylinder, install its cover and diaphragm, and discard the fluid bled from the brake system.
HYDRO-BOOSTThe system should be bled whenever the booster is removed and installed.
  1. Fill the power steering pump until the fluid level is at the base of the pump reservoir neck. Disconnect the battery lead from the distributor.
Remove the electrical lead to the fuel solenoid terminal on the injection pump before cranking the engine.
  1. Jack up the front of the car, turn the wheels all the way to the left, and crank the engine for a few seconds.
  2. Check steering pump fluid level. If necessary, add fluid to the "ADD" mark on the dipstick.
  3. Lower the car, connect the battery lead, and start the engine. Check fluid level and add fluid to the "ADD" mark, as necessary. With the engine running, turn the wheels from side to side to bleed air from the system. Make sure that the fluid level stays above the internal pump casting.
  4. The Hydro-Boost system should now be fully bled. If the fluid is foaming after bleeding, stop the engine, let the system set for one hour, then repeat the second part of Step 4.
The preceding procedures should be effective in removing the excess air from the system, however sometimes air may still remain trapped. When this happens the booster may make a gulping noise when the brake is applied. Lightly pumping the brake pedal with the engine running should cause this noise to disappear. After the noise stops, check the pump fluid level and add as necessary.


Hope helps with this (remember comment and rated this).

Jun 19, 2010 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Install new brake pads and rotors all 4 wheels. Replaced front 2 calipers. Bled brakes. New clean fluid coming out. pedal is still soft and goes to floor. 200 Seebring.


Are you losing any Brake Fluid? Is it visible anywhere at the four wheels? Is it visible anywhere else?
The Master Cylinder may be defective. When you bled the Brakes did you maintain proper Brake Fluid Level in the Master Cylinder? If you didn't: and air entered into the Master Cylinder there maybe air within in the system in the Master Cylinder. You can bleed the Master Cylinder by removing the brake lines, adding more fluid, pumping the brakes, bleeding the air out of the system.
Are you losing Brake Fluid and can't find a noticeable leak? Then there is a good posibility that the rear seal in the Master Cylinder is leaking and the Fluid is going into the Brake Booster - which is the large wheel shaped drum located on the fire wall. In this case both the Brake Booster and the Master Cylinder will have to be removed and replaced. The Booster contains seals that Brake Fluid is very caustic to and will ruin these seals- causing future failures.
If no Brake Fluid is lost, no leak found: Check the Brake Booster Vacuum Advance. This should be connected to the outside of the Booster, attached to a hose, with the hose going to the engine. Check to see if this is working properly. Replace if needed.

Dec 31, 2009 | 2002 Chrysler Sebring

1 Answer

Losing brake fluid & have no brakes unless I pump them


quick tests to do to see if your master cyl is nackerd.

pull the valve on the brake buster out ( the 1 with rubber hose attached, and be gentle so as not to brake it)
check for moisture/ brake fluid on the valve. if there is mosture you will need a new master cyl.

you can also undo the master cyl from the booster and gently slide it forward and see if there is any fluid behind it and on the back off it if there is fluid you will need a new master cyl

good luck these checks are very easy and you should be ok to perform them

Jan 02, 2009 | 1992 Ford F250

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