Question about Jeep Liberty

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My jeep is overheating off and on what could the problem be the coolant bubbles in the filling resovur

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You may have head gasket issues. Have a shop do a Block Check. They will use a blue fluid to test for combustion gases in the cooling system, if present, the fluid turns yellow and you have head gasket problems.

Posted on Sep 01, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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1 Answer

Coolant reservoir bubbling


Have it tested for a bad head gasket.
Why would you be using it at all
in that condition (overheating)?

Aug 01, 2013 | Jeep Cars & Trucks

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1992 Jeep Cheroke Limited overheating my upper radiator hose burst yesterday morning. replaced the hose added coolant still overheating. removed the thermostat started it and it is still overheating and...


replace the cap , its allowing the system to over pressurize, also, you could have an air bubble thats moving around in the system, always make sure that you fill the radiator to just cover the radiator fins inside, this allows a place for expansion to happen. what you need to do is BURP your system, leave the cap off and start the vehicle, ( before doing this step,, make sure that you've replaced the thermostat, spring towards the motor , it only works one way!! ) once you see the fluid inside the radiator moving, it means the thermostat has opened, and your fluid level should drop down, slowly add more until the fins are just covered, and wait for it to close and recycle one more time, refill again, that should purge the system of unwanted air,, replace the cap, and fill the over flow tank to the lower level line,, and you should be set

Aug 10, 2011 | Jeep Grand Cherokee Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

#7 cylinder misfire after overheating


Look for water in the oil, steam in exhaust , and oil and or bubbles in the coolant resevoir. Suspect a blown head gasket. May try just changing that one spark plug. Sometimes overheating can cause a extreme lean condition which can burn a plug.

Jan 09, 2011 | 2003 Land Rover Discovery

1 Answer

I had my radiator replaced after an accident in my 2004 jeep liberty. the temp gauge never said it was overheating but it took a dump on me yesterday for the last couple weeks the "cold fill" take has been...


The easiest way is to usually just remove the lower radiator hose. All of the coolant will come out in a couple of minutes so you will need to have a big bucket. Around 3-4 gallons will come out. It sounds like the shop used too much water in the coolant mix. It is supposed to be 50/50 or better(better being more than 50% straight coolant) and water. If you drain what they put in there and refill with straight coolant ( not the premix from the store but rather the non-mixed stuff) you probably wont even have to go back to the mechanic.
Your coolant sounds like it is boiling which can be very bad for the engine. Once you remove the lower radiator hose, just reconnect it and fill it back up. It will be the largest hose going into the radiator at the bottom of the radiator. There may be a bleed screw on the top of the thermostat housing. If so open it with the car running till coolant bleeds out in a steady stream then close it and your done.

I hope this helps!! Thanks!!!

Oct 06, 2010 | 2004 Jeep Liberty

1 Answer

2002 chrysler 3.5 overheating - new rad, water


It can a the first stage of blowing head gasket.

Fill your coolant tank to the full mark when it's COLD.

Start the car, and pay close attention to the tail pipe for a small puff of white smoke.

After 15 minutes,If you do see any vapor then take the car for a 8 minutes drive.

Park the car and listen for bubbling sound from the coolant tank,

If you see bubbles coming up then you will need a head gasket change real soon.




Jul 17, 2009 | 2002 Chrysler 300M

1 Answer

Overheating


Begin by changing the thermostat...from what you have written this is the best starting point. Is the lower hose substantially cooler than the upper when it's overheating?

Apr 26, 2009 | 1998 Jeep Cherokee

2 Answers

1989 cherokee xj major overheating issue


Fill up the cooling system and start the jeep. Let the jeep get at operating temp with the radiator cap off. If the coolant level goes down, add more. Keep your eye on the radiator level and see if any bubbles appear while the car is running. DON'T keep your head over the filler neck, if you do see alot of bubbles or air bubbles, you could have a bad headgasket.

Feb 06, 2009 | 1989 Jeep Cherokee

1 Answer

Temperature gauge indicates overheating, but engine not overheating, coolant being push into reservoir.


hi my name is brad i see you are haveing a problem and i think i might know the problem. if you have done all of that to your car and it still over heating you might have a blown head gasket one way to check is to pull your thermostat out and fill your coolant leaving the cap off then start you car let it rrun a few minutes and if you see bubbles the radiator its the head gasket even though you wont have coolant in your oil or out the tail pipe. if you check that and ther is no bubbles i have one other spot for you to check ( dont know if you have the 1.5 or 1.6 sohc ) but if you have the 1.6 sohc with the mpfi you should check on the throttle body at the idle air control valve(IAC) you will see two small line`s that have coolant some times on hondas with high millage the line will fill with crud and that can cause a problem.. if you have any other honda needs please let me know

Brad Ross

Nov 08, 2008 | 2003 Honda Civic

1 Answer

Overheating


Who did the replacement of the parts? Was it done at a shop or at home? Do you know if the cooling system was "burped" after the parts were installed and the coolant was refilled? If you're not sure, burp the radiator. This is easy to do. Jack up the vehicle so that the thermostat is angled upward. Start the car and let it idle until it's 3/4 of the way to overheating, then shut it off and allow it to cool down somewhat. Then pop the cap, let the coolant drain down, and refill it. Restart the vehicle and repeat the process, until the coolant level doesn't drop anymore.

What you're doing is this - anytime the cooling system is opened up, especially when the fluid is drained and parts are replaced, air gets into the system. When you reassemble and refill with coolant, you trap air bubbles in the system. Since the system is sealed, it operates under pressure. As the car runs, the coolant and the air bubbles are circulated. The bubbles get caught behind the thermostat (if you have it angled upward) and keep it from opening. This causes the engine to heat up to the point of overheating. You want to allow it to get about 3/4 of the way to an overheat so that you know the air bubbles are blocking the thermostat. Shutting down the car stops it from heating up to the point of damage, and allows the system time to cool off so that when you pop the cap, you don't get an explosion of coolant in your face. Once it's cool enough to open the system, you open it and release the pressure. This allows the thermostat to open and bleed the bubbles upward to the open cap, where they "burp" into the air. The space they took up fills with coolant, which is why your coolant level drains down. You top it off and repeat to make sure that all the bubbles are out. You'll know you're in good shape when you let it run and it gets to operating temperature and doesn't overheat anymore. Let it cool that final time, open the cap, and since you have no air pockets left in the system, nothing will burp out and your coolant level won't decrease. Then you should be good to go - put the cap back on and drive away happy.

Sep 27, 2008 | 1996 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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