Question about 1996 Lincoln Mark VIII

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Could an ignition coil problem cause my car to not start? The battery is good. I use a battery jumper and it will start, but when I turn the engine off, it will not restart. The battery is not turning the starter over.

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  • Lincoln Master
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If the car jump starts, the coil is fine. Sounds like your battery is not charging. If you have a voltmeter, check voltage at bettery with engine running. Should be 14-15 volts. If you don't have a voltmeter, take the alternator to the parts store to be checked.

Posted on Sep 01, 2010

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I have an 89 ford bronco and it wont turn over


Fords require 10 + volts to activate the solenoid.
A faulty solenoid, weak battery, or bad connections can cause the solenoid to click. Especially a battery with a dead cell that looks like it is charged.
If the solenoid is clicking the neutral safety switch is ok. If you are only hearing relays click, take a test light and check the 16 gauge wire on the solenoid for voltage with the key in start position.
Also jumper that post with the battery post on the solenoid to crank the engine.

Jun 29, 2012 | 1989 Ford Bronco

1 Answer

SKIPPING PROBLEM . SPARK PLUGS & WIRES HAS BEEN DONE. THERE'S NO 12 VOLTS AT THE COIL CONNECTOR PLUG WITH THE KEY ON. LYMAN


Sound like a ground problem; the fastest way to identify the Power and Ground Circuits is using a wiring diagram. If you don't have one you'll have to find out by trial and error as you probe each circuit.

The power circuit is tested with the Key On and Engine Off. Place one end of your multimeter or Test Light on the Battery Negative Terminal and with the other end, probe the Power Circuit. Turn the Key to the Run position. If the Power Circuit is OK, the Multimeter will show 12 Volts or the Test Light will light up. Here are the possible results:
* You got 12 Volts on the Power Circuit
Good, this is a good sign. The next step is to check the Ground Circuit of the Coil on Plug connector that you're testing.

* No Power in only one Ignition Coil
Without 12 Volts, the Coil-on-Plug Ignition Coil will not work, thus you have just eliminated that specific Ignition Coil as the source of the fault. Replacing the Ignition Coil with a new one will only be a waste of time and money since, without Power the new one will not Spark.
Since the Power Circuit is shared by all of the coils on the majority of Coil-on-Plug Ignition Systems. The most likely cause will be an open short in that Ignition Coil's Power Circuit.
You'll have to consult your Repair Manual's wiring diagrams to make sure how everything is wired up.
After repairing the short, re-do the Spark Test to verify the Ignition Coil is now working.

* No Power at any Ignition Coils
The fuse or relay that supplies this voltage is blown or BAD.
You'll have to consult your Repair Manual's wiring diagrams to see where this fuse and/or relay is located and replace as necessary.
After replacing the blown fuse or the defective relay. Retest the Ignition Coil.

Them, the Ground Circuit is tested with the Key On or Off. It doesn't matter because this is a Chassis Ground. Place one end of your multimeter or Test Light on the Battery Positive Terminal and with the other end, probe the Ground Circuit. If the Ground Circuit is OK, the Multimeter will show 12 Volts or the Test Light will light up.

* You got Ground
Good, now the next step is to verify that the Coil-on-Plug Ignition Coil is receiving the Triggering Signal. This info belongs to the next section of this article.

* No Ground in only one Ignition Coil
Without this Ground, the Coil-on-Plug Ignition Coil will not work, thus you have just eliminated that specific Ignition Coil as the source of the fault. Replacing the Ignition Coil with a new one will only be a waste of time and money since, without Ground the new one will not Spark.
Since the Ground Circuit is shared by all of the coils on the majority of Coil-on-Plug Ignition Systems. The most likely cause will be an open short in that Ignition Coil's Ground Circuit.
You'll have to consult your Repair Manual's wiring diagrams to make sure how everything is wired up.
After repairing the short, re-do the Spark Test to verify the Ignition Coil is now working.

* No Ground at any Ignition Coils
This usually happens thru' human error in most cases and is a very rare thing. Usually the engine was replaced and this ground was not re-attached.
You can Ground this circuit with a jumper wire. Jumpering to Ground just one Coil-on-Plug Ignition Coil should provide Ground to all of them (consult your Repair Manual's Wiring Diagrams to be sure).
With this jumper wire to Ground attached, crank the vehicle.
If in fact the Ground Circuit does have an open short, this (the jumper wire to Ground) should make the vehicle start, or at least get the Ignition Coil to Spark.
Repair the open short and retest for Spark or retry starting the vehicle.


Hope this helps. Keep us updated.

Aug 19, 2011 | 2003 Chrysler Town & Country

2 Answers

No spark from coil 1991 chrysler labaron v 6


Start by testing the ignition coil primary, and secondary resistance.

To measure the primary resistance, connect an ohmmeter between the positive (+) and negative (-) terminals (the terminals which are connected to the engine wiring harness) on the coil. To test the secondary resistance, connect an ohmmeter between the positive (+) coil terminal and the high voltage cable terminal on the coil. Then, measure the resistance between the positive (+) coil terminal and the coil case; the resistance for the case should exhibit infinite resistance. For coils manufactured by Diamond, the primary resistance at 70-80°F (21-27°C) should be 0.97-1.18 ohms and the secondary resistance should be 11,300-15,300 ohms. Coils built by the Toyodenso company should exhibit a primary resistance at 70-80°F (21-27°C) of 0.95-1.20 ohms and a secondary resistance of 11,300-13,300 ohms. Replace any coil with a new one if it does not meet the specifications.

FAILURE-TO-START TEST Before proceeding with this test make certain that spark has been checked for at the coil. Refer to the ignition coil testing procedures. Failure to do this may lead to unnecessary diagnostic time and wrong test results. CAUTION
Be sure to apply the parking brake and block the wheels before performing any test with the engine running.
  1. Check the battery voltage. It must be at least 12.4 volts to perform the test. If the battery voltage is not at least 12.4 volts, refer to Section 1 for battery charging procedures.
  2. Crank the engine for 5 seconds while monitoring the voltage at the coil positive (+) terminal. If the voltage remains near zero during the entire period of cranking, refer to Section 4 for the On-board Diagnostic checks. The checks will test the PCM and the auto shutdown relay.
  3. If the voltage is at near-battery voltage and drops to zero after 1-2 seconds of cranking, refer to Section 4 On-board Diagnostic procedures. The problem is likely to be related to the distributor reference pick-up circuit to the PCM.
  4. If the voltage remains at near battery voltage during the entire 5 seconds, with the key OFF, remove the PCM 60-way connector. Check the 60-way connector for any terminals that are pushed out or loose.
  5. Remove the connector to the coil positive (+) and connect a jumper wire between the battery positive (+) terminal and the coil (+) terminal.
  6. Using the special jumper wire shown in the illustration, momentarily ground terminal No. 19 of the 60-way connector. A spark should be generated when the ground is removed.
  7. If a spark is generated, replace the PCM with a new one.
  8. If no spark is generated, use the special jumper wire to ground the coil negative (-) terminal directly.
  9. If a spark is produced, inspect the wiring harness for an open circuit condition.
  10. If no spark is produced, replace the ignition coil with a new one.
TESTING
  1. Check for stored trouble codes, then proceed as follows:
    • Fault code 11 - proceed to the next step.
    • Fault code 54 - proceed to step 6.
    NOTE: Before proceeding, verify that a minimum of 12.4 volts is available from the battery for operation of cranking and ignition systems.
  2. Test the distributor pick-up signal reference circuit as follows:
    1. Turn the ignition switch to the OFF position.
    2. Unplug the distributor pick-up connector.
    3. Remove the coil wire from the distributor cap and have an assistant hold it 1⁄4 in. (6mm) from a good engine ground.
    4. Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
    5. Connect a jumper wire to the gray (GY) wire terminal and touch the other end of the jumper wire to the black/light blue (BK/LB) wire terminal on the distributor harness connector several times. While performing this, observe the coil wire.
      • If there is spark from the coil wire, proceed to the next step
      • If there is no spark from the coil wire, the problem is in the engine controller or wiring.
  3. Check the power supply to the distributor reference pick-up as follows:
    1. Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
    2. Connect a voltmeter between the orange wire in the harness connector and a known good ground.
      • If the reading on the voltmeter is 8-9.5 volts, proceed to the next step.
      • If the reading is anything but 8-9.5 volts, check for problems in the circuit between the reference connector and the engine controller.
  4. Check the mechanical operation of the distributor as follows:
    1. Turn the ignition switch to the OFF position.
    2. Remove the distributor cap from the distributor housing.
    3. Crank the engine while observing the ignition rotor.
      • If the distributor rotor revolves while the engine is being cranked over, replace the distributor pick-up coil assembly with a new one.
      • If the distributor rotor did not rotate, inspect the engine for a mechanical fault and repair as necessary.
  5. If fault code 54 (No distributor sync pick-up signal) is being received, or was received before performing this test, proceed as follows:
    1. Turn the ignition switch to the OFF position.
    2. Unplug the distributor pick-up connector.
    3. Connect a voltmeter to the tan/yellow (TN/YL) wire of the harness connector.
    4. Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
      • If the reading on the voltmeter is at 4 volts, replace the distributor pick-up coil assembly.
      • If the reading is 0 volts, check for an open in the wiring harness between the reference connector and the engine controller.

Jan 30, 2011 | 1991 Chrysler LeBaron

1 Answer

My 92 dakota is not getting any spark


Engine Fails To Start

The "Checking For Spark'' test should be performed prior to this test.

This is a basic test of the ignition system that systematically examines the battery, the coil, the engine controller, and its wiring harness and connections; the most likely culprits in a no-start condition at this stage.
88472304.gif

Fabricate this special jumper with a 0.33 MF capacitor in-line to test the ignition coil
Click to Enlarge

  1. Unplug the ignition coil harness connector at the coil.
  2. Connect a set of small jumper wires (18 gauge or smaller) between the disconnected harness terminals and the ignition coil terminals.
88472314.gif

Terminal locations on the engine controller 14-way connector-1989 models
Click to Enlarge 88472305.gif

Engine controller 60-way connector-relevant terminals for testing are shown numbered
Click to Enlarge

  1. Attach one lead of a a voltmeter to the positive (12V) jumper wire. Attach the negative side of the voltmeter to a good ground. Measure the voltage at the battery and confirm that enough current is available to operate the starting and ignition systems.
  2. Crank the engine for five seconds while monitoring the voltage at the coil positive terminal:
    1. If the voltage remains at zero, diagnosis of the fuel system should be performed. Also check the engine controller and auto shutdown relay.
    2. If voltage is at or near battery voltage and then drops to zero after one or two seconds of engine cranking, check the engine control module circuit.

WARNING

The ignition must be turned OFF prior to unplugging the engine controller connector. If it is not, electrical surging could occur causing damage to the unit or other electrical components in the vehicle.

  1. If the voltage remains at or near battery voltage during the entire five seconds, turn the ignition key OFF. Remove the 14-way connector on 1989 models, or the 60-way connector on 1990-96 models at the engine controller. Check the 14-way or 60-way connector for any spread terminals.
  1. Remove the test lead from the coil positive terminal. Connect an 18 gauge jumper wire between the battery positive terminal and the coil positive terminal.
  2. Make a special jumper cable (see illustration). Using the jumper MOMENTARILY ground terminal 12 on the 14-way connector (1989), or terminal 19 (see illustration) of the 1990-96 60-way connector. A spark should be generated at the coil wire when the ground is removed.
    1. If a spark is generated, replace the engine controller computer.
    2. If no spark is seen, use the special jumper to ground the coil negative terminal directly. If spark is produced, repair the wiring harness for an open circuit condition. If spark is not produced, replace the ignition coil
    this is for distributor ignition
THIS IS TESTING OF DISTRIBUTORLESS IGN
Testing

This procedure requires an ohmmeter to test the coil packs for primary and secondary resistance (specifications are given for an ambient temperature of 70-80°F/21-27°C).
88472320.gif

The two coil packs contain five independent coils, which fire paired cylinders (shown numbered)
Click to Enlarge

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Determine the manufacturer of the coil. It should be labeled either a Diamond or Toyodenso.
88472779.gif

Location of critical terminals for checking the coil primary resistance-V10 engine front coils
Click to Enlarge 88472780.gif

Location of critical terminals for checking the coil primary resistance-V10 engine rear coils
Click to Enlarge

  1. Check the secondary resistance of each individual paired coil by connecting an ohmmeter across the coil towers. This must be done between the correct cylinder pairs: 3/2, 7/4, 1/6, 9/8, or 5/10. Resistance for a Diamond coil should be 11,300-15,300 ohms. For a Toyodenso manufactured coil pack, resistance should be 11,300-13,300 ohms.
88472323.gif

Use an ohmmeter to check secondary resistance as shown

  1. Check the primary resistance of the front coil pack by attaching an ohmmeter between the B+ coil terminal and either the right (cylinders 3/2), center (cylinder 7/4), or left coil (cylinders 1/6) terminals. Resistance for a Diamond coil should be 0.97-1.18 ohms. Resistance for a Toyodenso coil should be 0.95-1.20 ohms.
  2. To test the primary resistance of the rear coil pack, attach an ohmmeter between the B+ coil terminal (see illustration) and either the right (cylinders 9/8), or left (cylinders 5/10) coil terminals. Resistance for a Diamond coil should be 0.97-1.18 ohms. Resistance for a Toyodenso coil should be 0.95-1.20 ohms.
i hope this helps any more questions repl if help at all plz vote or comment me

Jan 17, 2011 | 1995 Dodge Dakota

1 Answer

Engine wont start with the key in ignition. Can


the first thing is to check all connection to battery then check the ignition switch not the key part but the electrical switch in column. start there

Dec 19, 2009 | 2005 GMC Sierra

1 Answer

My car will not turn over. Lights, radio and electric windows work. There are no sound turning on car.


Check battery voltage first. If this looks good, it could be a starter or ignition coil problem.
Try jump starting. See your owners manual for the correct procedure. (Usually you dont want to connect jumper cable terminal directly to the battery negative. Idealy to the chasis.)
Could be somthing as simple as the engine managment fuse too. When you turn the ignition on if the checkengine light does not come on, its is more than likely the fuse.
Start simple!
Good luck.

Jun 15, 2009 | 1995 Subaru Legacy

1 Answer

No power nothing


not really charge battery n try again

Jan 06, 2009 | 1996 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

Wont start or turn over?


check the ignition coil for liq of white stuff on wall of coil.

Oct 30, 2008 | 1988 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

Car would not start or the engine wouldn?t even turn over.


Try removing spark plugs and turning engine over by hand with socket wrench on harmonic dampner if it spins freely probably not engine problem fluid in cylinders will cause hydro lock indicating blown head gasket or injector stuck wide open. a broken timing belt would still allow engine to turn over as your car should not have an interference engine. If engine will not turn by hand with spark plugs out susspect internal engine damage siezed bearings broken rod and so.

Oct 16, 2008 | 1992 Honda Accord

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