Question about 1988 Dodge Dakota

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I need to replace a 1 5/8 expansion plug on a 3.9 v6 in a 1988 dakota. should i use brass or steel and do i need a special tool to do so? The plug is out, i just need to get a new one in. Thank-You

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I would use a brass since it corrodes less than a steel plug you can use a freeze plug installer or a large socket

Posted on Aug 30, 2010

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How to bleed the radiator on a peugeot 2006 307 XS model


B1GG0RK1 - 206 TU ENGINE DW8 ENGINE
DRAINING - FILLING - BLEEDING COOLING SYSTEM
1 - SPECIAL TOOLS
b1gk06lc.gif[1] filling cylinder (-).0173/2 .
2 - DRAINING
TU ENGINE
b1gk070c.gifDW8 ENGINE
b1gk073c.gifALL MODELS
Carefully remove the expansion chamber cap .
b1gk06kc.gifUnscrew the radiator drain plug (1) .
NOTE : fit a pipe to the outlet to allow clean drainage of the system .
TU ENGINE
b1gk071c.gifDW8 ENGINE
b1gk074c.gifALL MODELS
Open the bleed screws (2) .
DW8 ENGINE
b1gk075c.gifDrain the engine by removing the plug (3) .
ALL MODELS
3 - FILLING AND BLEEDING THE SYSTEM
Before any re-filling operation, flush the cooling circuit with clean water .
WARNING : check the cooling system for leaks .
DW8 ENGINE
b1gk076c.gifTU ENGINE
b1gk072c.gifALL MODELS
Fit the filling cylinder [1] to the filler opening .
Open all the bleed screws .
Fill the circuit slowly with coolant .
Close the bleed screws in the order in which the liquid flows without bubbles .
The filling cylinder must be filled to the 1 litre mark to bleed the heater matrix correctly .
Start the engine .
Maintain the engine speed at 1500 to 2000 rpm until the end of the second cooling cycle (fan(s) starting then stopping) keeping the filling cylinder filled to the 1 litre mark .
Stop the engine .
Remove the filling cylinder [1] .
Immediately tighten the plug on the expansion chamber .
If necessary fill up to the level of the maximum mark (Engine cold) .

Jul 06, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

Tip

Setting Timing Without 3 So Called SPECIAL TOOLS Needed


1997-2000 Ford Contour 2.0L DOHC Camshaft Set up For timing Belt Replacement.most Instructions Call For 3 Different Special Tools No NeedFORD UPGRADED TIMING PULLEYS AND TENTIONERS In a UPGRADE KIT
Remove Valve Cover And TOP Timing Belt Cover CUT BELT OFF, Go to Rear of CAMSHAFTS (OppositeSPROCKETS) Look and you will see SLOTS at the end of Each CAM they are CUT ECCENTRICALLY . Use a Piece of Sturdy FLAT STOCK HARD STEAL (STRAIGHT) Turn CAMS one at a TIME Until they are EVEN With COVER GASKET SURFACE of Head, ALIGN BOTH Cams this Way Insert FLAT STOCK IN SLOTS So CAMS Don't Spring Back, And you Have VALVE TRAIN TIMED PERFECTLY, #1 Spark Plug OUT Bar Over to TDC WOODRUF KEY Should be Pointed Straight UP. This Is ALL there is to IT. Proceed with Timing Cover Removals and front Mount, REPLACE ALL PULLEYS AS A KIT (SOLD AS KIT) Install Timing Belt Set Tensioner According to KIT Instructions ans this will Illuminate All Special Tools SAID to be NEEDED for this Procedure, (( REMOVE FLAT STOCK AT CAMSHAFT ENDS AFTER BELT IS TIGHTENED.Install New Valve Cover Gasket #1 Spark Plug and Job is Done. Cuts 1 Hour 15 Minutes off Flat Rate

on Dec 31, 2009 | Ford Contour Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

I have a 1998 Ford Expedition. I have been told that I have a bad coolant leak coming from rear freeze plug and that I should replace the engine. My question is, do the engine need too be replaced or do I...


If you look on the side of an engine block you will see a line of circular depressions about an inch and a half in diameter and about a quarter of an inch deep. These are actually holes in the side of the engine block which are plugged with a dish shaped metal plug called a "freeze plug" or "expansion plug". WHAT FREEZE PLUGS DO As with many things on a car, there is an "official reason" and a "REAL" reason for freeze plugs. The official reason (and the source of the name) is this: If you run just water with no antifreeze in your car's cooling system the water can freeze. When water freezes, it expands. If water freezes inside your engine block, it can expand and crack the block, destroying the motor. Freeze plugs (or expansion plugs) will "pop out" and supposedly prevent this. In reality this doesn't work all the time: I've seen MANY blocks destroyed by cracking without the freeze plugs popping out, or if they do pop out the block cracks anyway. THE REAL PURPOSE OF FREEZE PLUGS OR EXPANSION PLUGS Engines are "sand cast". A special type of sand is poured into a pair of boxes. A "die" is pressed into the sand, making an impression of the engine block to be cast. The sections of the mold are then put together and molten iron is poured in, forming the engine. This is why engines have a rough texture on most areas: this is the texture of the sand used to cast them.There have to be "cylinders" made of sand in the middle of this mold to create the cylinders of the engine block. These chunks of sand can't just "float" inside the mold: SOMETHING has to hold them in place. There are little columns of sand that connect the cylinder mold to the outer mold half. The mold for the cylinder "sits" on top of these. After the block is cast, these holes are machined smooth and a "freeze plug" or "expansion plug" is put in to plug the hole.
THE PROBLEM WITH FREEZE PLUGS OR EXPANSION PLUGS The problem with freeze plugs or expansion plugs is that they are made of very thin metal, AND THEY RUST!!! From the factory they are made of galvanized steel, and if you always run a 50/50 mix of antifreeze in your cooling system you should never have a problem. Unfortunately many people don't do this, and the freeze plugs rust through, creating a cooling system leak.When I replace freeze plugs or rebuild an engine I always use brass plugs: they only cost a tiny bit more and will not rust through. The manufacturers don't use brass plugs of course: they cost a few cents more, and they will save a penny anywhere they can: pennies add up to millions of dollars!
SIGNS OF BAD FREEZE PLUGS If you have a bad freeze plug your vehicle will leak coolant. If you have a slow cooling system leak that comes and goes, you may have a pinhole freeze plug leak. l Freeze plugs are in different places on different cars, but normally they will be down the side of the block (at least 3 of them) and in the back of the block, between the engine and the transmission. Some are fairly easy to get to, others require removing various parts off the engine, some even require removing the transmission or engine to replace! Some cylinder heads also have smaller plugs in them, often under the intake or exhaust manifold.So if you have water leaking down the side of your engine, or water leaking from the hole in the bell housing between the engine and transmission, you probably have a bad freeze plug. Sometimes the hole in the freeze plug is very small, and can periodically stop when a piece of crud from the cooling system jams in the hole.
FREEZE PLUG REPAIR If the leak is slow and small, a stop leak or block seal compound might work. I have had good luck with K&W Liquid Block Seal: it's good stuff! Of course, as with any "rig" of this sort, it might not work, might not last for long, and could clog up something else in your cooling system. The right way to fix it is to replace the freeze plug. FREEZE PLUG REPLACEMENT To remove a freeze plug, first hammer it into the block with a big screwdriver or a large punch. It won't go far into a modern engine: there isn't much room behind the plug. When it "pops through" you can easily pry it back out of the hole sideways with a pair of pliers or a screwdriver. Be careful not to scratch the surface of the hole where the plug sits, or it could leak around the circumference of the new plug.
After the plug is removed, clean the hole in the block with sandpaper to remove the corrosion and old sealant. Once again, if you don't do this the new one might leak.Normal freeze plugs are hammered in with some sealant around them. I use aviation grade Permatex sealer.
A special tool is made to install freeze plugs: the tool is available at a good auto parts store. In a pinch you can use a large socket that just barely fits inside the rim of the plug, however this can damage the new plug if you aren't careful.
If you can't get to the freeze plug to hammer it in, you have to take off whatever parts are in the way to access the plug. Sometimes it's easier to remove the engine from the car. Another option when access is limited is an expanding replacement freeze plug. These replacement plugs are made of either copper or rubber. A nut on them expands the plug against the block when tightened. These plugs can be installed in areas too tight to hammer in a regular freeze plug. I have had bad luck with the rubber type: they blow back out quite often. I have had good results with the copper type (made by Dorman).
I have not had good results with either type on Ford products: Ford for some reason makes their freeze plugs in "odd" dimensions, like 1 and 51/64 of an inch. You can get the copper type plug in 1/8 th increments, but it won't expand enough to fit the Ford size. The rubber type will SEEM to expand enough, but it will stay in for a week or so then blow out, dumping all your coolant out in a matter of seconds!!!
So on all Fords I just do whatever it takes to pound a regular style brass plug into the block.

Here are some pictures of a Ford F-150 truck freeze plug job I did.

The hard part is taking the exhaust and intake manifolds off: after that the job is easy. CAUTION! I have one issue with this freeze plug video: He uses no sealant on the new freeze plugs, and he's not using brass freeze plugs.
I always use aviation grade permatex sealant on freeze plugs. It's available at any good auto parts store.Don't use RTV silicone: I've seen freeze plugs "pop out" with silicon seal.
Freeze plugs will work when put in "dry", but they might "weep" a small amount of coolant.
ef89772a-3f1b-412b-bc7a-627f024dd76b.jpg c9d84666-d779-46c8-a9ee-4ee71a71ad14.jpg 0626e0f3-8efc-4409-ab0c-cc4923e4ee96.jpg b89a2ab0-aba7-4b01-a2ee-d5f4ad94c546.jpg 41560920-4b57-4ef8-af06-69d69c2463bd.jpg

Apr 03, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

CAR IS LEAVIING WATER AND OVER HEATING WATER IS LEAKING BY STARTER?


This is likely a freeze plug that has rotted away. Freeze plugs are steel or brass inserts about 2 -3 inches in diameter that allow for the engine block to flex instead of crack under extreme temperatures. Look carefully nearest the starter and that is what you will most likely see. The old one will need to be extracted with a screw driver or other suitable tool. The new one will need to be fitted carefully or you will either push it into the engine block or it will continue to leak.

Dec 16, 2010 | 1987 Chevrolet El Camino

1 Answer

What tools do i need to replace front wheel bearing hub assembly


Floor jack- jack car up and put a jack stand under it. A tire lug to remove tire. A 36 mm socket to unbolt axle shaft sticking through bearing hub. Next a Brass hammer with a block of wood. Next center wood on axle shaft sticking through bearing hub and hit with a 4lb brass or steel hammer with a wood block on shaft. Next you need a 10mm or 12mm socket on back side of bearing hub should have 3 bolts holding it unbolt. Last use a pry bar and gradually pry bearing out and no there not pressed in like a lot of people think.
(Socket sizes maybe different)
If you take it somewhere it would cost about $800 and up.

May 03, 2009 | 2000 Pontiac Grand Am GT

1 Answer

How do get the fuel filter off


there is a special tool you can get at parts stores need to get 3/8 or 1/2 if you can tell that the lines are the same size (3/8) or they swell out to a larger line (1/2) need that tool every time replace filter

Apr 28, 2009 | 2004 Ford F150

1 Answer

REAR BRAKES


the center cap is your hub. It can be removed by a special tool (don't know tool number) but its a hub removal tool. Or you can use a brass punch and 5lb sledge and knock it loose that way. Another suggesion is to by a pully

Apr 23, 2009 | 2006 Chevrolet HHR

1 Answer

Changing spark plugs on V6


you will have to remove intake manifold to gain access to cyl 1 3 5. there are no special tools it can be done with hand tools. i would replace wires since you are there. intake gasket can be reused but if you wanna be safe or got high mileage replace

Feb 03, 2009 | Hyundai Motor 2003 Sonata

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