Question about 2002 Chevrolet Monte Carlo

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Had a po102 code on a 2002 3800 engine chevy check voltage at 12 volts.cleaned sensor. reset code now it says po102 pd with no engine,but engine stalls when driving

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HI, The DTC set PO102 is for your MAF (mass air flow) sensor. this sensors measures the air moving past it my heating a fine wire much like one inside a light bulb. Even cleaning these will not get the contaminates off. That little wire gets very hot and if dirt gets on it it will bake to it then this throws off its readings for your computer. If you checked and you have your 5 volt reference for this sensor the only other thing is to replace it. You can get re-manufactured one now at any major parts store. Good luck

Posted on Aug 28, 2010

  • Jennifer Dyer Jul 10, 2011

    they are really easy to change too they are right on top under the engine cover

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Chevy cobalt 2010 scan code po641 reduce engine power


Possible causes
- Faulty Engine Control Module (ECM)
- ECM harness is open or shorted
- ECM circuit poor electrical connection
- Shorted sensor on 5 volt circuit
help.jpg What does this mean? When is the code detected?
The Engine Control Module (ECM) has detected the sensor 5 volt reference circuit voltage is higher or lower than expected
Possible symptoms
- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)
P0641 Chevrolet Description
The control module has 2 internal 5-volt reference buses called "5-volt reference 1" and"5-volt reference 2". Each reference bus provided 5-volt reference circuit for more than one sensor. Therefore, a fault condition on one 5-volt reference circuit will affect the other 5-volt reference circuits connected to the reference bus. The control module monitors the voltage on the 5-volt reference buses.

Read more: http://engine-codes.com/p0641_chevrolet.html#ixzz31AP60YfR

Apr 19, 2014 | 2010 Chevrolet Cobalt

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I have a 94 blazer and the check engine soon light came on and shortly after it started hesitating when i would hit the gas


Hi, the problem may be at the TPS or the MAP sensor. First extract the trouble code following instructions below. Then troubleshoot the indicated signals/sensors.


jturcotte_2348.gif



Fig. Fig. 1: ALDL connector-1994 models

Listings of the trouble for the various engine control system covered in this guide are located in this section. Remember that a code only points to the faulty circuit NOT necessarily to a faulty component. Loose, damaged or corroded connections may contribute to a fault code on a circuit when the sensor or component is operating properly. Be sure that the components are faulty before replacing them, especially the expensive ones. The Assembly Line Diagnostic Link (ALDL) connector or Data Link Connector (DLC) may be located under the dash and sometimes covered with a plastic cover labeled DIAGNOSTIC CONNECTOR.

  1. On all 1994 models the diagnostic trouble codes can be read by grounding test terminal B . The terminal is most easily grounded by connecting it to terminal A (internal ECM ground). This is the terminal to the right of terminal B on the top row of the ALDL connector.
  2. Only 1995 models equipped with a PCM use the OBD I system. All other 1995 and later models use the OBD II system. The diagnostic trouble codes on 1995 OBD I systems can be read by grounding test terminal 6 . The terminal is most easily grounded by connecting it to terminal 5 (internal ECM ground).
  3. Once the terminals have been connected, the ignition switch must be moved to the ON position with the engine not running.
  4. The Service Engine Soon or Check Engine light should be flashing. If it isn't, turn the ignition OFF and remove the jumper wire. Turn the ignition ON and confirm that light is now on. If it is not, replace the bulb and try again. If the bulb still will not light, or if it does not flash with the test terminal grounded, the system should be diagnosed by an experienced driveability technician. If the light is OK, proceed as follows.
  5. The code(s) stored in memory may be read through counting the flashes of the dashboard warning lamp. The dash warning lamp should begin to flash Code 12. The code will display as one flash, a pause and two flashes. Code 12 is not a fault code. It is used as a system acknowledgment or handshake code; its presence indicates that the VCM can communicate as requested. Code 12 is used to begin every diagnostic sequence. Some vehicles also use Code 12 after all diagnostic codes have been sent.
  6. After Code 12 has been transmitted 3 times, the fault codes, if any, will each be transmitted 3 times. The codes are stored and transmitted in numeric order from lowest to highest.
The order of codes in the memory does not indicate the order of occurrence.
  1. If there are no codes stored, but a driveability or emissions problem is evident, the system should be diagnosed by an experienced driveability technician.
  2. If one or more codes are stored, record them. Refer to the applicable Diagnostic Code chart in this section.
  3. Switch the ignition OFF when finished with code retrieval or scan tool readings.
jturcotte_2355.gif

MAP sensor tests:
TESTINGSee Figures 1, 2 and 3

jturcotte_2349.gif

Fig. Fig. 1: Typical Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor wiring diagram (wire color, terminal identification/location may vary on certain models)

  1. Backprobe with a high impedance voltmeter at MAP sensor terminals A and C .
  2. With the key ON and engine off, the voltmeter reading should be approximately 5.0 volts.
  3. If the voltage is not as specified, either the wiring to the MAP sensor or the VCM may be faulty. Correct any wiring or VCM faults before continuing test.
  4. Backprobe with the high impedance voltmeter at MAP sensor terminals B and A .
  5. Verify that the sensor voltage is approximately 0.5 volts with the engine not running (at sea level).
  6. Record MAP sensor voltage with the key ON and engine off.
  7. Start the vehicle.
  8. Verify that the sensor voltage is greater than 1.5 volts (above the recorded reading) at idle.
  9. Verify that the sensor voltage increases to approximately 4.5. volts (above the recorded reading) at Wide Open Throttle (WOT).
  10. If the sensor voltage is as specified, the sensor is functioning properly.
  11. If the sensor voltage is not as specified, check the sensor and the sensor vacuum source for a leak or a restriction. If no leaks or restrictions are found, the sensor may be defective and should be replaced.
jturcotte_2350.gif

Fig. Fig. 2: Using jumper wires and a high impedance voltmeter test between MAP sensor terminals A and C with the key ON and engine off. The voltage should be approximately 5 volts


jturcotte_631.jpg

Fig. Fig. 3: Next test between MAP sensor terminals A and B with the key ON and engine off. The voltage should be approximately 0.5 volts

MAP sensor
jturcotte_632.jpg

Throttle position sensor test
TESTINGSee Figures 1, 2 and 3

  1. Backprobe with a high impedance voltmeter at TPS ground terminal and 5 volt reference signal terminal.
  2. With the key ON and engine off, the voltmeter reading should be approximately 5.0 volts.
  3. If the voltage is not as specified, either the wiring to the TPS or the VCM may be faulty. Correct any wiring or VCM faults before continuing test.
  4. Backprobe with a high impedance voltmeter at the TP signal terminal and the sensor ground terminal.
  5. With the key ON and engine off and the throttle closed, the TPS voltage should be approximately 0.5-1.2 volts.
  6. Verify that the TPS voltage increases or decreases smoothly as the throttle is opened or closed. Make sure to open and close the throttle very slowly in order to detect any abnormalities in the TPS voltage reading.
  7. If the sensor voltage is not as specified, replace the sensor.
jturcotte_2352.gif

Fig. Fig. 1: Common Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) wiring diagram (wire color, terminal identification/location may vary on certain models)





jturcotte_2353.gif

Fig. Fig. 2: Using jumper wires and high impedance voltmeter, test between the sensor ground and reference terminals, the voltage should be approximately 5 volts


jturcotte_2354.gif

Fig. Fig. 3: Next test between the sensor signal and ground terminals, verify that the TPS voltage increases or decreases smoothly as the throttle is opened or closed

Oct 01, 2011 | 1994 Chevrolet S-10 Blazer

1 Answer

I have a 1997 Chevy Blazer with the 4.3 engine. The Service Engine light keeps coming on. I scanned the codes and replaced the O2 sensor just before the catalytic converter. The light is still coming on...


P0146 pd means pending code
Pending codes and DTCs? Posted on November 12, 2010 by fcrmaster
When reading codes from your vehicle the fault code reader may show them as pending codes or normal Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC).
Pending codes (also known as continuous monitor codes) will be registered when an intermittent fault occurs. If that fault does not happen again after x number of start/stop cycles, the ECU will erase the code from memory. If the fault is persistent it becomes a DTC.
If you have read pending codes it is advisable to check the codes again after a week or so. If there is no apparent problem with the vehicle it is safe to erase the codes too and check back. But always make a note of any fault codes with the date and mileage of a vehicle.
If the codes read include a DTC then you need to investigate further. This you can either do yourself or advise your garage. If, again, you don't see an apparent problem (depending n the severity of the code) with the vehicle you can note the codes down and erase them. Then check again after a week or a few days depending on how often the vehicle gets used. If a repair has been made (previous owner) the DTC may just not have been reset after the repair.
The other numbers behind the code 01/06 , 02/06, 03/06 , 05/06 ,04/06 These don't mean anything . cheap code reader .
DTC P0140 HO2S Circuit Insufficient Activity Sensor 2
DTC P0146 HO2S Circuit Insufficient Activity Bank 1 Sensor 3
DTC P0171 Fuel Trim System Lean Bank 1
DTC P0174 Fuel Trim System Lean Bank 2
Sorry but this is something you should take to a qualified repair shop that has a diagnostic tool that can view sensor scan data.
Causes of lean condition trouble codes P0171 P0174 GM 5 3L

Jul 23, 2017 | 1999 Chevrolet Camaro

1 Answer

1990 Chevy Lumina showing codes 12 and 21. What are they?


code 12 flashes any time trouble codes are pulled without the car running. It is normal and think it has something to do with not receiving distributor pulse.

Code 21 has to do with the TPS (throttle position sensor) voltage being to high. You'll need a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) to check this out. Unplug the TPS sensor and check for 5volts on the grey wire, and make sure the black wire has a good ground. If those check out plug the sensor back in. Back probe the blue wire. you should see around .5 volts with the throttle closed. The voltage should go up smoothly as you slowly open the throttle. At wide open throttle the voltage should be around 4.9 volts. If any of the above three are not true I would suspect a bad throttle position sensor.

Oct 24, 2010 | 1990 Chevrolet Lumina

1 Answer

I have 1993 dodge dakota 3.9l v-6 with trouble codes 12,15 and 55 what do they mean


the trouble codes are as follows code 12 problem with battery connection. direct battery input tp pcm disconnected within the last 50 ignition key-on cycles. code 15 a problem with the vehicle distance/speed signal. no distance/speed sensor signal detected during road load conditions. code 55 completion of fault code display on check engine light. this is an end of message code. the speed sensor is located on the transmission/transfer case extension housing. check plug connection to speed sensor for power using an volt meter. connect the positive side of volt meter to the orange wire terminal and the negative side of volt meter to the black/light blue terminal. the voltage should be approximately 8.0 volts and to check the voltage from the pcm connect the positive end of volt meter to the white/orange wire terminal and the negative side ti the black/light blue wire terminal. signal voltage should be 5.0 volts. if there is no signal voltage signal, have the pcm checked out. if you have both signals from the terminals then remove the vehicle speed sensor and check the speedometer pinion for worn or missing teeth.

Apr 07, 2010 | 1993 Dodge Dakota

1 Answer

I am trying to test the crank sensor on my 99 intrepid and need to know how to test


No-Start Diagnosis
The diagnostic procedure for EI (electronic ignition) systems varies depending on the vehicle make and model year. Always follow the procedure recommended in the vehicle manufacturer's service manual.
The following procedure is based on Chrysler EI systems. The crankshaft timing sensor and camshaft reference sensor in these systems are modified Hall-effect switches.
If a crank or cam sensor fails, the engine will not start. both of these sensor circuits can be checked with a voltmeter or lab scope.
If the sensors are receiving the correct amount of voltage and have good low-resistance ground circuits, their output should be a pulsing digital signal or voltmeter reading while the engine is cranking.
If any of these conditions do not exist, the circuit needs to be repaired or the sensor needs to be replaced. When the engine fails to start, follow these steps:
  1. Check for fault codes 11 and 43.
    • Code 11, "Ignition Reference Signal," could be caused by a defective camshaft reference signal or crankshaft timing sensor signal.
    • Code 43 is caused by low primary current in coil number 1, 2 or 3.
  2. With the engine cranking, check the voltage from the orange wire to ground on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor. fr_24.13.gif Crankshaft timing and camshaft reference sensor terminals.
    • Over 7V is satisfactory.
    • If the voltage is less than specified, repeat the test with the voltmeter connected from PCM (powertrain control module) terminal 7 to ground.
    • If the voltage is satisfactory at terminal 7 but low at the sensor orange wire, repair the open circuit or high resistance in the orange wire.
    • If the voltage is low at terminal 7, the PCM may need replacement.
      • Be sure 12V are supplied to the PCM terminal 3 with the ignition switch off or on, and 12 V must be supplied to PCM terminal 9 with the ignition switch on.
      • Check PCM ground connections on terminals 11 and 12 before PCM replacement.
  3. With the ignition switch on, check the voltage drop across the ground circuit (black/light blue wire) on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor.
    • A reading below 0.2V is satisfactory.
NOTE When using a digital voltmeter to check a crankshaft or camshaft sensor signal, crank the engine a very small amount at a time and observe the voltmeter. The voltmeter reading should cycle from almost 0 volts to a highter voltage of about 5 volts. Since digital voltmeters do not react instantly, it is difficult to see the change in voltmeter reading if the engine is cranked continually.
  1. If the readings in the previous two steps are satisfactory, connect a lab scope or digital voltmeter from the gray/black wire on the crankshaft timing sensor and the tan/yellow wire on the camshaft reference sensor to ground. fr_24.14.gif Lab scope patterns from the camshaft and crankshaft position sensors.
    • When the engine is cranking, a digital pattern should be displayed or the voltmeter should cycle between 0 and 5 volts.
    • If the voltage does not cycle, sensor replacement is required.
    • Each sensor voltage signal should cycle from low voltage to high voltage as the engine is cranked.
A no-start condition can occur if the PCM "locks up."
  • In step 2 above, if 0 volts is indicated the PCM may be faulty or it may be locked up.
  • If the PCM is locked up it will not store a fault code for the reason.
  • Basically, the PCM will lock up when it goes into a safeguard routine if the 9-volt or 5-volt reference voltage shorts to ground. This shuts down the PCM to protect it. Since it shuts down, no DTCs (Diagnostic trouble code) are stored.
  • The engine will not start as long as the ground is present. An intermittent ground will cause the engine to stop running.
  • Attempting to restart the engine without cycling the ignition switch to the full LOCK position will not start the engine, even if the ground is lifted.
    • Cycle the ignition switch to the LOCK position and wait about 5 to 10 seconds.
    • If the ground is lifted, the PCM will reset and the engine will start and run until the ground occurs again.
  • On 1996 and new SBEC III and JTEC engine controllers, there are two 5-volt reference signals. The sensors that require 5 volts are separated, thus If this signal shorts to ground the engine will still stop running, but for the first time a DTC can be set.
  • Also note, if the 9-volt reference voltage is opened, there will be no DTC stored for the crankshaft or camshaft positions sensors. With an open circuit the PCM cannot tell if the engine is cranking or not. The diagnostic routing does not begin until the PCM senses engine cranking.

Nov 10, 2009 | 1999 Dodge Intrepid

2 Answers

What is a 5 Volt Reference Circuit ? this is a problem on my chevy malibu a 1998


a reference circuit is a reduced voltage(less than 12) that is current controled
without it your car may suddenly accelerate smply by you turning
your heater or Ac on (the battery voltage changes )
it's used on many cars for the sensors like the throttle posisition
or Map
if the fault code says you lost it
you got a shorted wire or sensor somewhere on the engine

consult your vehicles engine wire diagram to see what sensors run on 5 volt ref
then start lookin and unhookin
(chiltons avail in most public librarys has a good wire diagram)

Jul 15, 2009 | 1998 Chevrolet Malibu

1 Answer

2000 Saturn LS2 Code # po102 mass or volume


You just ruined the sensor...sorry :o(
This time its the dealer or mechanic ($80-200)
Good Luck

Jun 14, 2009 | 2001 Saturn S-Series

1 Answer

2002 chevy impla v6 esngine 3800 check engine light is on, codes read po102 what does this mean


Code p0102, on either the 3.4 or 3.8 (3800) v6 engine is a problem in the Mass Air Flow sensor (MAF). If any work has been done to it just prior to this code, then you need to make sure the air cleaner, duct work, breather tubes, etc. are properly connected and not loose. If that is OK, then may have a bad, or dirty sensor.
Tech JK

Dec 20, 2008 | 2006 Chevrolet Impala

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