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Replaced with new master cylinder,bench bleed master cylinder,installed and bleed all four wheels,I have a steady flow of fluid out of all four wheels,pedal still fades to the floor?

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  • jsbouck Aug 22, 2010

    Please explain what you mean by priming the master cylinder? I thought bench bleeding was the way to do it? Could you explain how to prime please.Thank-you

  • ray garcia Feb 16, 2013

    WELL IF YOU ARE SURE YOU DONE THE JOB CORRECT. ROAD TEST CLOSE BY 1 HARD BRAKE WILL IT HOLD. 1 LIGHT BRAKE WILL IT GADE . YES TO BOTH REPLACE MASTER

  • ray garcia Feb 16, 2013

    1 HARD BRAKE HOLD PRESURE 2 LIGHT BRAKE WILL IT FADE OR SLOWLY GO DOWN. YES TO BOTH NEEDS A MASTER CYLINDER

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  • Master
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Seems like your on the right path, Maybe the technique is wrong. Have you installed a master cyclinder and then bled the brakes on something else and it worked good? Most of the time if your not useing a power bleeder ( you don't need one ) you need two peale to do this job good. With your pedal pumper friend at the wheel, Have him (or her) pump the brakes several times making sure to let the pedel come all the way up. ( can you make sure that the pedel is coming all the way up, as it's adjustable at the pedel ) the pedal need not hold the master down at all . With this checked and it pumped up and the pumper hold ing the pedal down, Loosen a break line wher it connects to the master cyclinder, Listen and watch for air as the pedel goes down, keep the pedal down till you tighten the line back up. Have your pumper person pump it back up again, then do another line, no air and it's still bad, move on to the rear wheels first. Every time you let out some fluild check to see if it's full and fill it as this takes some fluild to get-r-dun. Have your pumper pump till they get as much pedal as they can and hold it down and open the bleeder and tighten it back as before with the pedal still down. Do it several times till no evidence of fluild haveing air bubles is gone ( straight fluild ) Do all the bleeders this way, making sure you don't run out of fluild. Wipe everything off and make sure it's full as you work. Now all this work is after you've done a complete brake teardown right? The rear shoes should be touching the drums ( very lightly ) The front brake pads have plenty of pad and the roters are smooth and unscored. If the rotors are rough they make the pistons return too far as you let up on the pedal and give a all the way down feeling. The rear shoes trying to move much will also do this. The drum being bell shaped is often the cause of this, A rear wheel cyclinder leaking may not leak out onto the tire but introduce air that undoes the bleed job.

Posted on Aug 22, 2010

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  • Master
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Did you prime the piston in the master cylinder before installing it? If no the seals are shot

Posted on Aug 22, 2010

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1 Answer

Rear brakes wont bleed


It is important to fully "bench bleed" the Master cylinder as air can get trapped in the body of the cylinder. DO not block off the ports and bleed , attach 4 bleeding adapters & hoses to the MC and bench bleed till you get no air. the you can install & bleed R/R wheel , then L/R wheel , then R/F wheel , finishing with the L/F wheel. when bleeding don't pump the pedal as that will aerate the fluid & make it harder.

Feb 16, 2015 | 2007 Chevrolet Chevrolet Malibu LS

1 Answer

No brakes on a 1986 honda accord


Did you get a good bleed with fluid coming out at all four wheels? If they bled good, and the pedal still goes to the floor, you need to check the brake master cylinder-it is probably shot with an internal leak. An internal leak will not let fluid pressure build up, so no brakes.

Did you keep the brake fluid reservoir from going dry while bleeding? If it went real low, air might have got back into the lines.

It is not uncommon when bleeding brakes on an older vehicle for the master cylinder to suddenly develop an internal leak and require replacement . Here's why: pushing the pedal all the way to the floor causes the master's piston to push in farther than ever before. The rubber cups then travel over a section of the cylinder not usually touched by the cups-old fluid can develop a crud there and when the piston pushes over it, the cups can get ruined. To avoid this when bleeding brakes, put a short piece of 2X4 wood block under the pedal. Then the pedal will not extend the master's piston beyond it's normal travel. Of course on a new master cylinder, you do not have to do this. A new master cylinder does require bench bleeding before installing, however, to ensure no air pockets develop from there.

Aug 24, 2014 | 1986 Honda Accord

1 Answer

1990 jeep wrangler bleeding breaks


Hi there:
I suggest to check this procedure, when the hydraulic brake system must be bled whenever a fluid line has been disconnected because air gets into the system.

A leak in the system may sometimes be indicated by a spongy brake pedal. Air trapped in the system is compressible and does not permit the pressure applied to the brake pedal to be transmitted solidly through the brakes. The system must be absolutely free from air at all times. If the master cylinder has been overhauled or a new cylinder has been installed, bleed the cylinder on a bench before installation. When bleeding brakes, bleed at the wheel most distant from the master cylinder first, the next most distant second, and so on. During the bleeding operation the master cylinder must be kept at least 3 / 4 full of brake fluid.


The ABS bleeding procedure is different from the conventional method. It consists of the following three steps:
Step 1: Conventional manual brake bleed.
Step 2: Bleeding the system using the DRB scan tool.
Step 3: An additional conventional manual brake bleed.

The recommended ABS bleeding procedure is as follows:
  1. To bleed the brakes, first carefully clean all dirt from around the master cylinder filler cap. Remove the filler cap and fill the master cylinder with DOT 3 brake fluid to the lower edge of the filler neck.
  2. Bleed the master cylinder first. Have a helper operate the brake pedal while bleeding each master cylinder fluid outlet line. Do not allow the master cylinder to to run out of fluid,as this will allow additional air to be drawn into the cylinder.
  3. Bleed the brake system in the following sequence:
    1. Master cylinder
    2. HCU valve body (at fluid lines)
    3. Right rear wheel
    4. Left rear wheel
    5. Right front wheel
    6. Left front wheel
  4. Clean off the bleeder connections at all four wheel cylinders. Attach the bleeder hose to the right rear wheel cylinder bleeder screw and place the end of the tube in a glass jar, submerged in brake fluid.
  5. Open the bleeder valve 1/2 - 3/4 of a turn.
  6. Have an assistant depress the brake pedal slowly and allow it to return. Continue this pumping action to force any air out of the system. When bubbles cease to appear at the end of the bleeder hose, close the bleeder valve and remove the hose.
  7. Check the level of fluid in the master cylinder reservoir and replenish as necessary.
  8. After the bleeding operation at each wheel cylinder has been completed, fill the master cylinder reservoir and replace the filler plug.

Do not reuse the fluid which has been removed from the lines through the bleeding process because it contains air bubbles and dirt.


  1. Perform the "Bleed Brake'' procedure with the DRB II scan tool. This procedure is described in the DRB II software information and diagnostic guide.
    1. Attach the DRB II scan tool to the diagnostic connector.
    2. Run the Bleed Brake procedure as described in the DRB II tester guide.
  2. Repeat the conventional bleeding procedure as previously outlined.
  3. Fill the master cylinder reservoir to the proper level.
  4. Check the brake operation.


Hope this helps.

Apr 21, 2013 | Jeep Wrangler Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

99 town & country put a new master cylinder on, bleed the brakes all the way around and still no brake pedal why?? what can i do to fix this.


did you bench bleed the master cylinder? are you getting good fluid flow and pressure from all four wheels? it is possible that you may have gotten a bad part.

Aug 07, 2011 | 1999 Chrysler Town & Country

2 Answers

I change my master cylinder for my brakes and now I have no brakes what could be my problem to that


you must have a lot of air in system. the brakes need bleed to let the air out of system. did you bench bleed the master cylinder before putting it on car ! if not thats why no brakes. to bench bleed a new master cylinder, put it in a vise. fill it full or the proper level of brake fluid. push on the plunger with a dowel or another object. pump it till all air is out of master cylinder, you can tell when no air. it will be all fluid coming out of cylinder. keep checking brake fluid in master cylinder.make sure you push plunger in all the way.when all air is gone replace on car. if you do not loose any fluid from the master cylinder lines, then you can replace it without having air in system. bleed each wheel if needed. good-day!

Jul 10, 2011 | 2006 Chevrolet Impala

2 Answers

Replaced master cylinder and wheel cylinders, bleed master cylinder and put all back together. Started bleeding brakes. Cant get any pressure at pedal what should I try?


First bench bleed the master cylinder. Or if its still on the car do this, have some one pump the pedal hold and open one line,do this three times, move to the next line pump three time hold and open the line. Hows the pedal. getting firmer no go ahead bleed as usual. let me know we can fix this together

Apr 22, 2011 | Volkswagen Beetle Cars & Trucks

4 Answers

Brake pedal to floor have replaced brake pads and master cylinder


Did the pedal go to the floor beforehand? Was the master cylinder leaking, and did you bleed it properly? If the master cylinder was not leaking, check your brake lines going to the rear wheels.

Jan 29, 2011 | 2000 Chevrolet Blazer

3 Answers

I just replaced my master cylinder on my 1994 ford thunderbird LX with a 4.6L V8. But my brake pedal is still going down to the floor board. What could be the cause of that?


you've bled the lines from back to front, and bled the master cylinder/ It sounds like air in the lines, so you should be able to get streams of fluid with no air at all bleeder screws-start from the furthest away from the master cylinder, to the closest, then do the master cylinder. If that doesn't work, you must have a broken line or a leaking caliper or wheel cylinder.

Jan 04, 2011 | Ford Thunderbird Cars & Trucks

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Brakes were working fine and all the sudden the pedal went to the floor bench blead new master cylinder still no pedal any ideas


what kind of vehicle?? wheel cylinder maybe, ... look in side rim for fluid... does new master loose fluid?? did you bleed brakes after new master install???

Apr 07, 2009 | 1994 Toyota 4Runner

1 Answer

How do I replace master cylinder myself on 1993 Dodge Cummins


Remove the old master cylinder. Use line wrenches to avoid damage to the brake line fittings. Bench bleed the the new master cylinder you have purchased. The parts store will tell you how to accomplish this and sell you the necessary bleed kit (note it may be included with the master cyl.). Carefully install the new master cylinder. Reconnect the brake lines and do not over tighten. Now with a helper, bleed the brake system. Start at the Right Rear wheel. Find the bleeder located on the back side of the wheel at the wheel cylinder. It should have a small rubber cap. Remove the cap and using a boxed in wrench, loosen the bleeder valve slightly while your helper is applying steady pressure to the brake pedal. The pedal will go to the floor and you will see and hear air bubbles come for the bleeder. Tighten the valve and then tell the helper to release the brake pedal and do it all over again. Keep doing this until no air appears. Periodically check the master cylinder and do not allow the fluid level to get too low as it will **** more air into the system. Remind you helper to never release the brake pedal until you give the OK. If he releases the pedal while the valve is open, air will be drawn into the system. Now after bleeding the RR wheel, move to the LR, then RF, and finish with the LF.

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