Question about BMW 318

1 Answer

Oil leak e36 318i BMW (1996). I have an oil leak and was told it is coming from the timing chain cover gasket. Where is this located and is it difficult for myself to replace the gasket?

Posted by on

  • webdude2000 Aug 21, 2010

    A very detailed and comprehensive how to.

    Thank you

×

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • BMW Master
  • 17,970 Answers

From BMW 318/325/M3/525/535/M5 1989-1993 Repair Information

Timing Chain Cover REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

M30 Engine

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Remove the cylinder head cover. Remove the distributor cap, rotor and rotor adapter.
  2. Drain the coolant to below the level of the thermostat and remove the thermostat housing cover.
  3. Remove the mounting bolts and note the lengths and positions of the bolts. Remove the upper timing case cover.
  4. Remove the fan, vibration damper and hub. Remove the water pump pulley. The power steering pump must be removed, leaving the pump hoses connected and supporting the pump out of the way but so the hoses are not stressed.
  5. Remove the piston which tensions the timing chain, working carefully because of very high spring pressure.
  6. Detach the tdc position sender.
  7. Loosen all the oil pan bolts, and then unscrew all the bolts from the lower timing case cover, noting their lengths for reinstallation in the same positions. Carefully, use a sharp bladed tool to separate the gasket at the base of the lower timing cover. Then, remove the cover.
To install:
  1. Check the condition of the oil pan gasket; replace if necessary. To install the lower cover, first coat the joints of the oil pan and block with sealer. Put it into position on the block, using new gaskets.
  2. Install the tensioning piston with the conical end of the spring against the plug. Install all bolts; then tighten the lower front cover bolts evenly; finally, tighten the oil pan bolts evenly. Torque the timing cover M6 bolts to 6-7 ft. lbs. (8-10 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs. (20-24 Nm). Tighten the oil pan M6 bolts to 6.5-8.0 ft. lbs. (9-11 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 13-15 ft. lbs. (18-22 Nm).
  3. To bleed the tensioner, fill the tensioner pocket where the piston contacts the tensioner rail with oil. Loosen the plug a few threads and move the tensioner rail back and forth until oil comes out of the plug threads and resistance is felt. Tighten the plug to 21-29 ft. lbs. (30-40 Nm).
  4. Inspect the hub of the vibration damper. If the hub is scored, install the radial seal so the sealing lip is in front of or to the rear of the scored area. Lubricate the seal with oil and install it with a sealer installer.
  5. Install the pulley/damper and torque the bolt to specifications. When installing, make sure the key and keyway are properly aligned. Install the tdc transmitter and its mounting bracket.
  6. Install the power steering pump and water pump pulley. Reinstall and tension all belts.
  7. Just before installing the upper timing case cover, check the condition of that area of the head gasket. It will usually be in good condition. If it should show damage, it must be replaced.
  8. Before installing the upper cover, use sealer to seal the joint between the back of the lower timing cover and block at the top. On some vehicles, there are sealer wells which are to be filled with sealer. If these are present, fill them carefully. Install new gaskets. Check the seal at the distributor drive and replace it, if necessary.
  9. Note that the top bolt on the driver's side and the bottom bolt on the passenger's side are longer. Tighten the 2 bolts that run down into the lower timing cover first to finger tight; torque the 6 bolts, then torque the bottom bolts. Torque the timing cover M6 bolts to 6-7 ft. lbs. (8-10 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs. (20-24 Nm).
  10. Inspect the sealing O-rings and replace, as necessary. Make sure the bolt at the center of the rotor has its seal in place and torque to 16-17 ft. lbs. (22-24 Nm). Install the rotor and distributor cap.
  11. Install the cylinder head cover. Install the thermostat and housing with a new O-ring. Fill the cooling system with coolant and bleed.

M42 Engine
  1. Remove the ignition leads and valve cover. Remove the cam position sender on the upper cover. Drain the coolant and remove the thermostat housing. Remove the thermostat.
  2. Remove the 11 bolts holding the upper timing cover. Remove the cover carefully to avoid damaging the head gasket.
  3. Remove the radiator, fan, belts and water pump pulley. The water pump does not need to be removed to remove the lower cover.
  4. Remove the damper and the crankshaft hub.
  5. Remove the 21 bolts and remove the cover.
To install:
  1. Check the engine block dowel sleeves. Install new gaskets on the cover. Check the condition of the radial seals and replace if necessary.
  2. Install the cover and torque the M6 bolts to 6-7 ft. lbs. (8-10 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs. (20-24 Nm).
  3. Install the crankshaft hub and damper. Install the water pump pulley and belts. Install the fan and radiator.
  4. Place sealer at the head gasket to cover joints. Place the upper cover with new gaskets. Install 2 bolts and press the upper cover into place by wedging down against the camshaft sprocket. Torque the M6 bolts to 6-7 ft. lbs. (8-10 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs. (20-24 Nm).
  5. Install the valve cover and ignition leads. Install the thermostat and cover. Install the cam position sender. Fill the cooling system with coolant mixture and bleed.

M50 Engine
  1. Remove the ignition coils and valve cover. Drain the coolant and remove the thermostat housing. Remove the thermostat.
  2. Remove the 8 bolts holding the upper timing cover. Remove the cover carefully to avoid damaging the head gasket.
  3. Remove the radiator, fan, belts and water pump pulley. The water pump does not need to be removed to remove the lower cover.
  4. Remove the damper and the crankshaft hub.
  5. Remove the 13 bolts and remove the cover.
To install:
  1. Check the engine block dowel sleeves. Install new gaskets on the cover. Check the condition of the radial seals and replace if necessary.
  2. Install the cover and torque the M6 bolts to 6-7 ft. lbs. (8-10 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs. (20-24 Nm).
  3. Install the crankshaft hub and damper. Install the water pump pulley and belts. Install the fan and radiator.
  4. Place the upper cover with new gaskets. Torque the M6 bolts to 6-7 ft. lbs. (8-10 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs. (20-24 Nm).
  5. Install the valve cover and ignition coils. Install the thermostat and cover. Fill the cooling system with coolant mixture and bleed.


continue...

Posted on Aug 21, 2010

  • ZJ Limited
    ZJ Limited Aug 21, 2010



    S14 Engine





    1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Drain the cooling system through the bottom of the radiator. Remove the radiator and fan.


    2. Disconnect all electrical plugs, remove the attaching nuts, and remove the air cleaner and airflow sensor.


    3. ote and, if necessary, mark the wiring connections. Then,
      disconnect all alternator wiring. Unbolt the alternator and remove it
      and the drive belt.



    4. Unbolt the power steering pump. Remove the belt and then move the
      pump aside, supporting it out of the way but in a position where the
      hoses will not be stressed.



    5. Remove the 3 bolts from the bottom of the bell housing and the 2 bolts below it which fasten the reinforcement plate in place.


    6. Remove the drain plug and drain the oil from the lower oil pan. Then, remove the lower oil pan bolts and remove the lower pan.


    7. Remove the 3 bolts fastening the bottom of the front cover to the
      front of the oil pan. Loosen all the remaining oil pan bolts so the pan
      may be shifted downward just slightly to separate the gasket surfaces.



    8. Remove the water pump. Remove the center bolt and use a puller to remove the crankshaft pulley.


    9. Remove the piston for the timing chain tensioner.


    10. Remove the bolts attaching the top of the front cover to the
      cylinder head. Then, remove all the bolts fastening the cover to the
      block.



    11. Run a sharp bladed tool carefully between the upper surface of the
      oil pan gasket and the lower surface of the front cover to separate
      them without tearing the gasket. If the gasket is damaged, remove the
      oil pan and replace it.



    To install:




    1. Before reinstalling the cover, use a file to break or file off
      flashing at the top/rear of the casting on either side so the corner is
      smooth. Replace all gaskets, coating them with silicone sealer. Where
      gasket ends extend too far, trim them off. Apply sealer to the area
      where the oil pan gasket passes the front of the block.



    2. Slide the cover straight on to avoid damaging the seal. Install
      all bolts in their proper positions. Coat the 3 bolts fastening the
      front cover to the upper oil pan with the proper sealant.



    3. Tighten the bolts at the top, fastening the lower cover to the
      upper cover first. Then, tighten the remaining front cover bolts and,
      finally, the oil pan bolts to 7 ft. lbs. (9 Nm). Torque the M6 bolts to
      6-7 ft. lbs. (8-10 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs. (20-24 Nm).
      Inspect the sealing O-rings and replace, as necessary. If it uses the
      dme distributor with the screw-off type rotor, make sure the bolt at the
      center of the rotor has its seal in place and that it is installed with
      a sealer designed to prevent the bolt from backing out.



    4. Torque the oil drain plug to 24 ft. lbs. (32 Nm) and both upper and lower oil pan bolts to 7 ft. lbs. (10 Nm).


    5. Reverse the remaining portions of the removal procedures, making
      sure to fill and bleed the cooling system and to refill the oil pan with
      the correct oil.





    S38 Engine





    1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Pull out the plug and
      remove the wiring leading to the airflow sensor. Loosen the hose clamp
      and disconnect the air intake hose. Remove the mounting nut and remove
      the air cleaner and airflow sensor as an assembly.



    2. Remove the radiator and fan. Remove the damper and hub.


    3. Remove the pipe that runs across in front of the front cover. Remove the mounting bolts and remove the water pump pulley.


    4. Loosen the top/front mounting bolt for the alternator. Remove the
      lower/front bolt. Loosen the 2 side bolts. Swing the alternator aside.



    5. Remove the power steering pump mounting bolts. Make sure to retain
      the spacer that goes between the pump and oil pan. Swing the pump aside
      and support it so the hoses will not be under stress.



    6. Remove the bolts at the top, fastening the lower front cover to
      the upper front cover. Remove the bolts at the bottom, fastening the
      lower cover to the oil pan. Loosen the remaining oil pan mounting bolts.



    7. Run a sharp bladed tool carefully between the upper surface of the
      oil pan gasket and the lower surface of the front cover to separate
      them without tearing the gasket.



    8. Loosen and remove the remaining front cover mounting bolts, noting
      the locations of the tdc sending unit on the upper/right side of the
      engine and the suspension position sending unit on the upper left. Also,
      keep track of the bolts that mount these accessories, as their lengths
      are slightly different. Remove the timing cover, pulling it off
      squarely.



    To install:



    1. Before reinstalling the cover, use a file to break or file off
      flashing at the top/rear of the casting on either side so the corner is
      smooth. Replace all gaskets, coating them with silicone sealer. Where
      gasket ends extend too far, trim them off. Apply sealer to the area
      where the oil pan gasket passes the front of the block.



    2. Slide the cover straight on to avoid damaging the seal. Install
      all bolts in their proper positions. Tighten the bolts at the top,
      fastening the lower cover to the upper cover first. Then, tighten the
      remaining front cover bolts and, finally, the oil pan bolts. Torque the
      M6 bolts to 6-7 ft. lbs. (8-10 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs.
      (20-24 Nm). Inspect the sealing O-rings and replace as necessary. If it
      uses the dme distributor with the screw-off type rotor, make sure the
      bolt at the center of the rotor has its seal in place and that it is
      installed with a sealer designed to prevent the bolt from backing out.



    3. Complete the installation procedure, making sure to refill and bleed the cooling system.


    Sound like any gasket lossed. Hope this solve it-

×

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Leaking oil from the timing chain cover


The problem is the amount of items you have to remove so you can get to the timing chain cover, remove it and replace a $5 gasket.

You can try tightening all the bolts a LITTLE. Don't overdo it though because if you break the bolts, you are looking at more money to remove those.

Oct 17, 2015 | 2009 Dodge Journey

1 Answer

I have a 1987 chevorlete nova 1.6 liters it has a small oil leak I have to put oil in it ever now it's seem like it's coming from the front left side


is the 1.6 liter a six cylinder or slant 6 cylinder by any chance. if not. look for fuel pump location, is this where the oil dripping. or cover that has bolts that have a cover there, if so the gaskets for the cover or the fuel pump gasket needs replacing., try crawling down there when the car is running and see if it linking from the oil pan toward the front cover of oil pan. look where the timing chain location it on the front of motor, and the fan maybe blowing the oil over there. or it could be the vavle cover top cover where the lifters are located, the oil can be linking from there and running down the motor, you will idea the bad gasket remove the bolts, clean off oil, old gasket material, new gasket sealant and gasket sets, bolts down, lets setup few hours, refill oil levels, and everything should be okay.

for more help
www.ask.com/
www.wikipedia.org/
www.infolinks.com/
www.info.com/
www.about.com/mfg.name/make/model/year/
/gasket/replacement/instructions/
/head/gasket/
/vavle/cover/gasket/
/timing/chain/cover/
/fuel/pump/gasket/
/side_panel/cover/gasket/
/oil/pan/gasket/
/type/of/gasket/sealant/

and

www.youtube.com/how/to/fix/gasket/problems/for/?????????????/

Oct 16, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Severe oil leak


It could be a bad oil pressure sending unit, valve cover gasket, timing chain cover gasket or oil pan gasket. If there's white smoke coming out of the exhaust it could have a blown head gasket but it's not a common problem with that engine.

Jun 11, 2014 | 1997 Pontiac Sunfire

1 Answer

My Bmw High mileage 320i E90 is having oil leaks problems they have changed the oil gaskets pipes from BMW butelp


clean the engine and check where it is coming from. Is it at the front of the rear> do you smell burning oil when you switch off the engine? Clean an area under the engine compartment and see where the oil is dripping from and get back to us. Typical places for leaks are the valve cover gasket, oil filter housing bracket.

May 13, 2014 | 2005 BMW 320i

1 Answer

I am leaking oil from my BMW but I can't see where it is coming from do you have any suggestions


Did you check around the upper timing chain cover gaskets? I found that these should be replaced along with the valve cover gaskets, otherwise there will still be leaks. They are easy to replace if you have been able to replace the valve cover gaskets.

The part diagram: http://www.spobd2.com/

Oct 17, 2013 | 1994 BMW 3 Series

2 Answers

Replace gasket, oil leak front of oil pan and timing chain cover


Yes, oil commonly leaks from its valve cover gasket the only way to fix this problem is buy replacing the gaskets. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
car cables & obd conectors

Dec 24, 2012 | 1993 Geo Tracker

4 Answers

Oil leak on driveway coming from front of engine


Dear Sir,
Here is the oil leaking Problem Identifying Technique

Engine oil leaks from the valve cover gasket are common.

  • The intake manifold plenum gasket may leak and cause increased oil consumption/burning and a spark knock during acceleration; the gasket should be replaced.
  • External oil leaks from valve cover gaskets, intake gaskets (front or rear), and the rear crankshaft (rear main) seal area are common. The rear main seal is an unlikely source. Normally, the bearing cap mating surfaces (as well as the sealing surface between the oil pan and bearing cap) are the source for the leaks.
  • Engine oil leaks at the distributor can be misdiagnosed as leaks from theintake manifold seal, oil pan gasket, or rear crankshaft (rear main) seal. A revised distributor is available if oil is found inside the distributor.
  • If the oil filter casing shows signs of distortion from excessive oil pressure, theoil pump should be replaced.
  • Often misdiagnosed as a leaking oil filter gasket, the oil filter adapter can seep from between the adapter and engine block.
  • Carbon buildup on the top of the piston is common. As the buildup increases with mileage and over time, symptoms may vary from light ticking, to ticking/hammering, to hammering/knocking noises. Fuel injector cleaner often solves the problem.

  • I think it helps to analyse u r Problem

    Nov 02, 2012 | Toyota Cars & Trucks

    1 Answer

    2000 740il smoke and oil leak.is it timing chain cover or is it valve cover problems?


    All BMW V8 motor have leak oil problem on bad gasket in valve cover. When remove plastic cover where is "BMW" in to camshaft &valve cover,its leak visible where is ignition coil on sparkplugs.

    Nov 10, 2010 | 1998 BMW 7 Series

    1 Answer

    1996 ford T-bird Lx V6 trying to remove timing chain cover to replace gasket ( oil leak above filter housing. All bolts I can see are removed, does the oil filter housing have to be removed also > and...


    cover has 2-4 bolts at front of oil pan and harmonic balancer will need to be removed to take cover of of crankshaft.. lemmee kno if that solves your problem...chris..

    May 09, 2009 | 1996 Ford Thunderbird LX

    1 Answer

    My BMW seems to be leaking oil from the rear underside


    the leak is most likely coming from either the differential cover gasket or the input flange that the drive shaft attaches to, this is called the pinion seal.

    Apr 07, 2009 | 1996 BMW 318

    Not finding what you are looking for?
    Cars & Trucks Logo

    Related Topics:

    2,045 people viewed this question

    Ask a Question

    Usually answered in minutes!

    Top BMW Experts

    Frankie B

    Level 2 Expert

    65 Answers

    Fred Sops

    Level 2 Expert

    272 Answers

    Doberman

    Level 2 Expert

    254 Answers

    Are you a BMW Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

    Answer questions

    Manuals & User Guides

    Loading...