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What is the glass tube in the A/C line called

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The sight glass.

Posted on Aug 21, 2010

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Can i use the light bulbs containing mercury outdoors.?


Hi
I assume you are talking about the energy saver type U tube glass, or spiral glass tube (low pressure mercury vapour)
These work fine outdoors, I have used them for 15 years or so in my outside glass ball light fittings. They soon warm up and vapourize the mercury in the tube, the glass is fine.

Regards Jacko
From down under.

Dec 11, 2016 | Mercury Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

The brackets that attach to the driver's window on my son's 2003 Grand Am have broken due to forcing a frozen window. The window is no longer attached to the slide mechanisms. I am wondering...


Hello, normally just the window sashes break. this is the plastic part that is glued on the bottom of the glass. you can but these asahes at your dealer. they simply just glue on with a special glue

Sash Channel Came Off Glass; Adhesive on Glass
  1. Remove the door glass and lay it on a protected table.
  2. Mark the location of the clip with tape.
  3. Remove the adhesive with a one edge razor blade.
  4. Clean the glass with Isopropyl alcohol.
  5. Important: Install adhesive into the applicator and squeeze some adhesive out before you install the mixing tube. After the mixing tube is installed, run a test bead the length of the mixing tube to ensure a good mix.
  6. Fill the sash channel clip with adhesive.
  7. Install the clip in the marked location.
  8. Reinstall the door glass and put the glass in the full up position for 24 hours.

Cut off the bottom edge of the guide with a cut off wheel. (Refer to the illustration above.)

Using a thin flat blade putty knife and a hammer, carefully remove the plastic piece on each side of the glass. (Refer to the illustration above).

  • Clean any adhesive from the glass using a one-edge razor blade. (Refer to the illustration above).
  • Clean the glass with Isopropyl alcohol.
  • Important: Install adhesive into the applicator and squeeze some adhesive out before you install the mixing tube. After the mixing tube is installed, run a test bead the length of the mixing tube to ensure a good mix.
  • Fill the sash channel clip with adhesive.
  • Install the clip in the marked location.
  • Reinstall the door glass and put the glass in the full up position for 24 hours.

  • 22689012
    Sash, Side Door Window
    12378568 (US)
    88901676 (Canada)
    Structural Urethane Installation Adhesive
    mrtechwrench_28.gif

    Jun 06, 2011 | 2003 Pontiac Grand Am

    1 Answer

    Air condition not functioning


    System Inspection
    Although the A/C system should not be serviced by the do-it-yourselfer, preventive maintenance can be practiced and A/C system inspections can be performed to help maintain the efficiency of the vehicle's A/C system. For A/C system inspection, perform the following: The easiest and often most important check for the air conditioning system consists of a visual inspection of the system components. Visually inspect the air conditioning system for refrigerant leaks, damaged compressor clutch, abnormal compressor drive belt tension and/or condition, plugged evaporator drain tube, blocked condenser fins, disconnected or broken wires, blown fuses, corroded connections and poor insulation.
    CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS Refrigerant leaks show up as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines, and especially on the hose and tubing connections. If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a certified air conditioning specialist.
    Fig. 1: Run your hand along the underside of all hose connections and check for leaks. If you find a leak, have it fixed by a certified air conditioning specialist.
    check%20ac%20leak.jpg KEEPING THE CONDENSER CLEAR Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush.

    Fig. 1: The position of the condenser in front of the radiator makes it particularly susceptible to collecting debris. Periodically, remove the accumulated bugs, leaves and other trash from the condenser. ac%202.gif
    CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT LEVEL There are two ways to check refrigerant level. On vehicles equipped with sight glasses, checking the refrigerant level is a simple matter. Many late model vehicles, however, do not have a sight glass, and you have to check the temperature of the lines to determine the refrigerant level.
    With Sight Glass The sight glass is normally located in the head of the receiver/drier. The receiver/drier is not hard to locate. It's a large metal cylinder that looks something like a fire extinguisher. Sometimes the sight glass is located in one of the metal lines leading from the top of the receiver/drier. Once you've found it, wipe it clean and proceed as follows:
    1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
    2. Cycle the air conditioner on and off to make sure what you are seeing is clear refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system off and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the off cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running, and the airflow from the unit in the vehicle is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
    3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant. Have it checked by a professional.
    4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as a series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost.
    1. Fig. 1: Oils streaks (A), constant bubbles (B) or foam (C) indicate there is not enough refrigerant in the system. Occasional bubbles during the initial operation are normal. A clear sight glass indicates a proper charge of refrigerant or no refrigerant at all, which can be determined by the presence of cold air at the outlets in the vehicle. If the glass is clouded with a milky white substance, have the receiver/dryer checked by a certified air conditioning specialist. ac%203.jpg

    Without Sight Glass On vehicles that are not equipped with sight glasses, it is necessary to feel the temperature difference in the inlet and outlet lines at the receiver/drier to gauge the refrigerant level. Use the following procedure:
    1. Locate the receiver/drier. It will generally be up front near the condenser. It is shaped like a small fire extinguisher and will always have two lines connected to it. One line goes to the expansion valve and the other goes to the condenser.
    2. With the engine and the air conditioner running, hold a line in each hand and gauge their relative temperatures. If they are the same approximate temperatures, the system is correctly charged.
    3. If the line from the expansion valve to the receiver/drier is a lot colder than the line from the receiver/drier to the condenser, then the system is overcharged. It should be noted that this is an extremely rare condition.
    4. If the line that leads from the receiver/drier to the condenser is a lot colder than the other line, the system is undercharged.
    5. If the system is undercharged or overcharged, have it checked by a professional air conditioning mechanic.
    Fig. 3: Checking the refrigerant charge if the system has no sight glass. ac%204.jpg

    Apr 26, 2011 | 1997 Nissan Sentra

    1 Answer

    Air conditioning not working


    System Inspection:


    Although the A/C system should not be serviced by the do-it-yourselfer, preventive maintenance can be practiced and A/C system inspections can be performed to help maintain the efficiency of the vehicle's A/C system. For A/C system inspection, perform the following: The easiest and often most important check for the air conditioning system consists of a visual inspection of the system components. Visually inspect the air conditioning system for refrigerant leaks, damaged compressor clutch, abnormal compressor drive belt tension and/or condition, plugged evaporator drain tube, blocked condenser fins, disconnected or broken wires, blown fuses, corroded connections and poor insulation.


    CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS : Refrigerant leaks show up as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines, and especially on the hose and tubing connections. If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a certified air conditioning specialist.
    Fig. 1: Run your hand along the underside of all hose connections and check for leaks. If you find a leak, have it fixed by a certified air conditioning specialist.
    check%20ac%20leak.jpg KEEPING THE CONDENSER CLEAR Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush.

    Fig. 1: The position of the condenser in front of the radiator makes it particularly susceptible to collecting debris. Periodically, remove the accumulated bugs, leaves and other trash from the condenser. ac%202.gif
    CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT LEVEL There are two ways to check refrigerant level. On vehicles equipped with sight glasses, checking the refrigerant level is a simple matter. Many late model vehicles, however, do not have a sight glass, and you have to check the temperature of the lines to determine the refrigerant level.
    With Sight Glass The sight glass is normally located in the head of the receiver/drier. The receiver/drier is not hard to locate. It's a large metal cylinder that looks something like a fire extinguisher. Sometimes the sight glass is located in one of the metal lines leading from the top of the receiver/drier. Once you've found it, wipe it clean and proceed as follows:
    1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
    2. Cycle the air conditioner on and off to make sure what you are seeing is clear refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system off and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the off cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running, and the airflow from the unit in the vehicle is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
    3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant. Have it checked by a professional.
    4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as a series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost.
    1. Fig. 1: Oils streaks (A), constant bubbles (B) or foam (C) indicate there is not enough refrigerant in the system. Occasional bubbles during the initial operation are normal. A clear sight glass indicates a proper charge of refrigerant or no refrigerant at all, which can be determined by the presence of cold air at the outlets in the vehicle. If the glass is clouded with a milky white substance, have the receiver/dryer checked by a certified air conditioning specialist. ac%203.jpg

    Without Sight Glass On vehicles that are not equipped with sight glasses, it is necessary to feel the temperature difference in the inlet and outlet lines at the receiver/drier to gauge the refrigerant level. Use the following procedure:
    1. Locate the receiver/drier. It will generally be up front near the condenser. It is shaped like a small fire extinguisher and will always have two lines connected to it. One line goes to the expansion valve and the other goes to the condenser.
    2. With the engine and the air conditioner running, hold a line in each hand and gauge their relative temperatures. If they are the same approximate temperatures, the system is correctly charged.
    3. If the line from the expansion valve to the receiver/drier is a lot colder than the line from the receiver/drier to the condenser, then the system is overcharged. It should be noted that this is an extremely rare condition.
    4. If the line that leads from the receiver/drier to the condenser is a lot colder than the other line, the system is undercharged.
    5. If the system is undercharged or overcharged, have it checked by a professional air conditioning mechanic.
    Fig. 3: Checking the refrigerant charge if the system has no sight glass. ac%204.jpg

    Feb 19, 2011 | 2006 Hummer H3

    1 Answer

    Air conditioner


    System Inspection
    Although the A/C system should not be serviced by the do-it-yourselfer, preventive maintenance can be practiced and A/C system inspections can be performed to help maintain the efficiency of the vehicle's A/C system. For A/C system inspection, perform the following: The easiest and often most important check for the air conditioning system consists of a visual inspection of the system components. Visually inspect the air conditioning system for refrigerant leaks, damaged compressor clutch, abnormal compressor drive belt tension and/or condition, plugged evaporator drain tube, blocked condenser fins, disconnected or broken wires, blown fuses, corroded connections and poor insulation.
    CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS Refrigerant leaks show up as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines, and especially on the hose and tubing connections. If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a certified air conditioning specialist.
    Fig. 1: Run your hand along the underside of all hose connections and check for leaks. If you find a leak, have it fixed by a certified air conditioning specialist.
    check%20ac%20leak.jpg KEEPING THE CONDENSER CLEAR Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush.

    Fig. 1: The position of the condenser in front of the radiator makes it particularly susceptible to collecting debris. Periodically, remove the accumulated bugs, leaves and other trash from the condenser. ac%202.gif
    CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT LEVEL There are two ways to check refrigerant level. On vehicles equipped with sight glasses, checking the refrigerant level is a simple matter. Many late model vehicles, however, do not have a sight glass, and you have to check the temperature of the lines to determine the refrigerant level.
    With Sight Glass The sight glass is normally located in the head of the receiver/drier. The receiver/drier is not hard to locate. It's a large metal cylinder that looks something like a fire extinguisher. Sometimes the sight glass is located in one of the metal lines leading from the top of the receiver/drier. Once you've found it, wipe it clean and proceed as follows:
    1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
    2. Cycle the air conditioner on and off to make sure what you are seeing is clear refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system off and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the off cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running, and the airflow from the unit in the vehicle is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
    3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant. Have it checked by a professional.
    4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as a series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost.
    1. Fig. 1: Oils streaks (A), constant bubbles (B) or foam (C) indicate there is not enough refrigerant in the system. Occasional bubbles during the initial operation are normal. A clear sight glass indicates a proper charge of refrigerant or no refrigerant at all, which can be determined by the presence of cold air at the outlets in the vehicle. If the glass is clouded with a milky white substance, have the receiver/dryer checked by a certified air conditioning specialist. ac%203.jpg

    Without Sight Glass On vehicles that are not equipped with sight glasses, it is necessary to feel the temperature difference in the inlet and outlet lines at the receiver/drier to gauge the refrigerant level. Use the following procedure:
    1. Locate the receiver/drier. It will generally be up front near the condenser. It is shaped like a small fire extinguisher and will always have two lines connected to it. One line goes to the expansion valve and the other goes to the condenser.
    2. With the engine and the air conditioner running, hold a line in each hand and gauge their relative temperatures. If they are the same approximate temperatures, the system is correctly charged.
    3. If the line from the expansion valve to the receiver/drier is a lot colder than the line from the receiver/drier to the condenser, then the system is overcharged. It should be noted that this is an extremely rare condition.
    4. If the line that leads from the receiver/drier to the condenser is a lot colder than the other line, the system is undercharged.
    5. If the system is undercharged or overcharged, have it checked by a professional air conditioning mechanic.
    Fig. 3: Checking the refrigerant charge if the system has no sight glass. ac%204.jpg

    Feb 19, 2011 | 1997 Suzuki Sidekick

    1 Answer

    Air conditioning not working


    System Inspection
    Although the A/C system should not be serviced by the do-it-yourselfer, preventive maintenance can be practiced and A/C system inspections can be performed to help maintain the efficiency of the vehicle's A/C system. For A/C system inspection, perform the following: The easiest and often most important check for the air conditioning system consists of a visual inspection of the system components. Visually inspect the air conditioning system for refrigerant leaks, damaged compressor clutch, abnormal compressor drive belt tension and/or condition, plugged evaporator drain tube, blocked condenser fins, disconnected or broken wires, blown fuses, corroded connections and poor insulation.
    CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS Refrigerant leaks show up as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines, and especially on the hose and tubing connections. If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a certified air conditioning specialist.
    Fig. 1: Run your hand along the underside of all hose connections and check for leaks. If you find a leak, have it fixed by a certified air conditioning specialist.
    check%20ac%20leak.jpg KEEPING THE CONDENSER CLEAR Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush.

    Fig. 1: The position of the condenser in front of the radiator makes it particularly susceptible to collecting debris. Periodically, remove the accumulated bugs, leaves and other trash from the condenser. ac%202.gif
    CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT LEVEL There are two ways to check refrigerant level. On vehicles equipped with sight glasses, checking the refrigerant level is a simple matter. Many late model vehicles, however, do not have a sight glass, and you have to check the temperature of the lines to determine the refrigerant level.
    With Sight Glass The sight glass is normally located in the head of the receiver/drier. The receiver/drier is not hard to locate. It's a large metal cylinder that looks something like a fire extinguisher. Sometimes the sight glass is located in one of the metal lines leading from the top of the receiver/drier. Once you've found it, wipe it clean and proceed as follows:
    1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
    2. Cycle the air conditioner on and off to make sure what you are seeing is clear refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system off and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the off cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running, and the airflow from the unit in the vehicle is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
    3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant. Have it checked by a professional.
    4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as a series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost.
    1. Fig. 1: Oils streaks (A), constant bubbles (B) or foam (C) indicate there is not enough refrigerant in the system. Occasional bubbles during the initial operation are normal. A clear sight glass indicates a proper charge of refrigerant or no refrigerant at all, which can be determined by the presence of cold air at the outlets in the vehicle. If the glass is clouded with a milky white substance, have the receiver/dryer checked by a certified air conditioning specialist. ac%203.jpg

    Without Sight Glass On vehicles that are not equipped with sight glasses, it is necessary to feel the temperature difference in the inlet and outlet lines at the receiver/drier to gauge the refrigerant level. Use the following procedure:
    1. Locate the receiver/drier. It will generally be up front near the condenser. It is shaped like a small fire extinguisher and will always have two lines connected to it. One line goes to the expansion valve and the other goes to the condenser.
    2. With the engine and the air conditioner running, hold a line in each hand and gauge their relative temperatures. If they are the same approximate temperatures, the system is correctly charged.
    3. If the line from the expansion valve to the receiver/drier is a lot colder than the line from the receiver/drier to the condenser, then the system is overcharged. It should be noted that this is an extremely rare condition.
    4. If the line that leads from the receiver/drier to the condenser is a lot colder than the other line, the system is undercharged.
    5. If the system is undercharged or overcharged, have it checked by a professional air conditioning mechanic.
    Fig. 3: Checking the refrigerant charge if the system has no sight glass. ac%204.jpg

    Feb 04, 2011 | 1986 Jaguar XJSC

    2 Answers

    How do I change the orifice tube on a 1998 Ford Mustang base model?


    THE SMALLER LINE GOES TO THE EVAPORATOR, i HAVE CHECKED WITH MY FRIEND AT FORD ON THIS PROBLEM AND HE SAID U HAVE TO REPLACE THE SMALLER AC LINE (HI PRESSURE LINE, THE ORIFICE TUBE IS PART OF THE HIGH PRESSURE LINE, HERE IS THE PART NUMBER FROM A SITE CALLED ROCKAUTO.COM
    MOTORCRAFT Part # YF2227 {#F6ZH19N651AD, F6ZZ19835A}
    factory installed AC High pressure refridgerant line.


    17ad533.jpg

    Jun 04, 2010 | 1998 Ford Mustang

    3 Answers

    Where is the oriface tube for the a/c?


    Hello TJ.
    If yours is the S15 Jimmy it is mounted inside the inlet tube to the evaporator.
    Number 142 in the diagram below.8692419.gif

    If it is the full size Jimmy the orifice tube is located in the evaporator inlet pipe (high side line) at the liquid line connection.
    You will need to undo #41 nut to get to it.
    Here is a diagram.
    a931f17.gif

    This should cover your question.

    KL

    Apr 29, 2010 | 1988 GMC Jimmy

    1 Answer

    Metal line running from side to side in brake system has ruptured. part# requested to price!


    this line is not sold as a ready make line, u must buy bulk brake line (3/16" ID) and make the line up, u need a tubing bender and a special tool called a tubing double flaring tool, the tools and the tubing will run u about $150, u can have a shop do it for less.

    Jan 23, 2010 | 1999 Oldsmobile Alero

    1 Answer

    Rear hatch glass has been smashed


    there is a thing called speed glass it is lexan and you cant break it even with a hammer
    yess remove old buttle with a heat gun and a knife

    Jan 03, 2010 | 2000 Hyundai Accent

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