Question about 2001 Pontiac Grand Prix

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The fan in my 2001 GPrix only works on the fifth level - not on 1 - 4. This is applicable to the basic heat/cool and air conditioning. Any comments on why this might be happening?

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Same thing happened to me. I changed the blower motor resistor and my problem was solved.

Posted on Sep 07, 2010

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The blower resistor is blown , it will be located near the blower motor, look for a harness with 5 or 6 connectors

Posted on Aug 20, 2010

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I have a 2001 cavalier that is overheating. I replaced the thermostat and it still overheats. There is lots of heat from the heater. What can the problem be?


Your radiator may need flushed or replaced.
Your Fan my not be working properly.
Your Catalytic Converter may need replaced.

Dec 11, 2014 | 2001 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

On my 2001 Honda Accord EX, the cooling fans will not come on when the air conditioner is turned on and it will not cool. What is causing this?


sounds like an air conditioning issue if your only complaint is the fans not coming on when air conditioning is used. you need to have the a/c sys checked out to see if you have a leak or perhaps refrigerant may be low. sometimes you may have a compressor that no longer works so the system may not be building up pressure so the pressure switch does not cycle the fans.

Sep 21, 2014 | 2001 Honda Accord

1 Answer

I am in saudiarab i have crown victoria 97 model it is working good but i have problum in air condition system when i run my car its running good no problum but when i start my air condition it is heating...


The air conditioning condenser creates a lot of heat when the a/c is on. The cooling fan is supposed to run the whole time the a/c is on to keep it cool. If the fan isn't on, the radiator will absorb this heat and cause your car to over heat. You should also check your coolant level. So, it sounds to me like your cooling fan isn't working.

Sep 13, 2011 | 1997 Ford Crown Victoria

1 Answer

Air conditioning not too cold ??


Hello,
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Let me explain in layman's terms how the air conditioning (AC) system works and what could be happening to your car.

Like your body, the air conditioning compressor is the heart of the AC system, and Freon is the blood. The compressor pumps Freon throughout the AC system, either the older type R12 which costs as much as gold it seems these days, or the new environmentally-friendly R134A Freon. This Freon is a gas and liquid combination that is compressed and circulated throughout the air conditioning system. The compressed Freon is pushed through the system under pressure and is passed through different sized metal and rubber hoses and a special valve called an expansion valve that cause the gas to expand and contract.

This expansion and contraction makes the Freon gas very cold. This cold gas makes its way via metal lines into the dash area of your vehicle to the evaporator core. This evaporator core is like a small radiator, except it has cold Freon circulating inside and not hot antifreeze. A small fan (the AC blower fan which you control from the control panel on the dash) sits in front of the evaporator core and blows air across this cold evaporator and then through the vents inside your vehicle.

The other objective of the air conditioning system is to remove the heat from inside the cab of the vehicle. This heat is removed by the Freon with the help of the AC condenser located at the front of the car (usually in front of the radiator). The Freon coming back from the evaporator carries the heat from the cab to the condenser via rubber and metal hoses. Just like your radiator, the condenser is lightweight aluminum with many internal winding coils.
The Freon travels through these coils, and in between these coils are small slits or fins that the Freon is forced through. The condenser will have an electric cooling fan mounted in front or behind it to push or pull air through these fins to remove the heat from the Freon. Some vehicles still use the old fashioned fan blade driven by the engine to pull air across the radiator and the condenser.
Now I know that is just a tidbit of information on how the air conditioning system works, and it is very general, but I wanted you to know what to look for to give you insight as to what might be happening with your vehicle.
A few causes of low cooling efficiency or no cooling at all at idle are:

Lack of air flow across the condenser. Make sure the electric cooling fan motor near the condenser is coming on, or in models that are equipped with a fan blade make sure this fan is turning and is turning very fast.

Low Freon levels. Freon level and pressure should be checked by your certified air conditioning mechanic.

Overheating. If the engine is running hot or overheating, it can have a noticeable negative affect on the air conditioning system. Some cars have two electric cooling fans, one for the air conditioning condenser and the other for the radiator. Make sure they are both working properly. Usually at idle on a hot day with the AC on both fans will be on.

When the vehicle is traveling at freeway speeds, the compressor is pumping the Freon throughout the system much faster and harder than at idle. There is a dramatic increase in air flow across the condenser due to 55 mph winds, and the engine is usually operating at a cooler, more efficient temperature as well, thus allowing the air conditioning system to operate efficiently.
Note: An air conditioning system that is somewhat low on Freon can still feel comfortable at freeway speeds due to the added air flow across the condenser which can overcome the ill effects of slightly low Freon. Periodic air conditioning performance checks by your mechanic are the best way to keep the system in great shape.

Hope this helps.

Goodluck

Oct 08, 2010 | 1998 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

How do you replace a radiator in a dodge shadow 1993


These are the instructions for a 4 cylinder motor.

  1. Disconnect the negative (-) battery cable.

CAUTION Do NOT remove the cylinder block or the radiator draincock with the system hot and under pressure because serious burns from coolant can occur.
  1. Drain the cooling system.
  2. Remove the hose clamps and hoses from the radiator. Remove the coolant reserve system tank-to-filler neck tube.
  3. Remove the automatic transaxle hoses, if so equipped.
  4. Remove the fan and fan support assembly by disconnecting the fan motor electrical wiring.
  5. Remove the fan shroud retaining clips, located on the top and bottom of the shroud for most of the vehicles (the Dynasty has them only on the top).
  6. Lift the shroud up and out of the bottom shroud attachment clips separating the shroud from the radiator. Avoid damaging the fan.
  7. Remove the upper radiator mounting screws. Disconnect the engine block heater wire, if so equipped.
  8. Remove the air conditioning condenser attaching screws located at the top front of the radiator, if the vehicle is equipped with air conditioning.
  9. Lift the radiator free of the engine compartment.
Care should be taken to NOT damage the radiator cooling fins or water tubes during removal or installation.
To install:
  1. Slide the radiator down into position behind the radiator support.
  2. Attach the air conditioning condenser to the radiator, if so equipped, with a force of approximately 10 lbs. (44 N) to seat the radiator assembly lower rubber isolators in the mount holes provided.
  3. Tighten the radiator mounting screws to 108 inch lbs. (12 Nm).
  4. Connect the automatic transaxle hoses, if so equipped. Tighten the hose clamps to 35 inch lbs. (4 Nm).
  5. Slide the fan shroud, fan and motor down into the clips on the lower radiator flange. Install new shroud retaining clips.
  6. Install the upper and lower radiator hoses (including the coolant reserve hose).
  7. Plug the fan motor electrical connection and attach the negative (-) battery cable.
  8. Fill the cooling system with coolant (refer to Section 1 for more details).
  9. Operate the engine until it reaches normal operating temperature. Check the cooling system and automatic transaxle (if equipped) for the correct fluid levels. Also check for coolant leaks.
Here are the instruction for a 6 cylinder engine.
6-Cylinder Engines
  1. Disconnect the negative (-) battery cable.

CAUTION Do NOT remove the cylinder block or the radiator draincock with the system hot and under pressure because serious burns from coolant can occur.
  1. Drain the cooling system.
  2. Remove the hose clamps and hoses from the radiator. Remove the coolant reserve system tank to filler neck tube.



  1. Remove the automatic transaxle hoses, if so equipped.
  2. Remove the fan and fan support assembly by disconnecting the fan motor electrical wiring.
  3. Remove the fan shroud retaining clips, located on the top and bottom of the shroud for most of the vehicles (the New Yorker, Dynasty, Fifth Ave., and Imperial have them only on the top).
  4. Lift the shroud up and out of the bottom shroud attachment clips separating the shroud from the radiator. Avoid damaging the fan.
  5. Remove the upper radiator mounting screws. Disconnect the engine block heater wire, if so equipped.
  6. Remove the air conditioning condenser attaching screws located at the top front of the radiator, if the vehicle is equipped with air conditioning.
  7. Lift the radiator free of the engine compartment.
Care should be taken NOT to damage the radiator cooling fins or water tubes during removal or installation.


To install:
  1. Slide the radiator down into position behind the radiator support.
  2. Attach the air conditioning condenser to the radiator, if so equipped, with a force of approximately 10 lbs. (44 N) to seat the radiator assembly lower rubber isolators in the mount holes provided.
  3. Tighten the radiator mounting screws to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm).
  4. Connect the automatic transaxle hoses, if so equipped. Tighten the hose clamps to 35 inch lbs. (4 Nm).
  5. Slide the fan shroud, fan and motor down into the clips on the lower radiator flange. Install new shroud retaining clips.
  6. Install the upper and lower radiator hoses (including the coolant reserve hose).
  7. Plug the fan motor electrical connection and attach the negative (-) battery cable.
  8. Fill the cooling system with coolant (refer to Section 1 for more details).
  9. Operate the engine until it reaches normal operating temperature. Check the cooling system and automatic transaxle for the correct fluid levels. Also check for coolant leaks.
please let me know if i can assist you in any further problems you may encounter with your vehicle.
please do not forget to rate and comment about your experience with fixya today.


Dec 27, 2009 | 1993 Dodge Shadow

1 Answer

Heater dump valve, causing car to over-heat when heat is on


To properly diagnose your overheating problem we need to rule out some things.
First: Is there enough coolant/antifreeze in the radiator? Don't just look inside the plastic overflow bottle, but remove the radiator cap (when the engine is cold) and look inside the radiator. You should be able to physically see the fluid level if it is at its proper level. Most cars and trucks will hold 1 1/2-2 gallons of coolant and water mixture. If you have to add more than a pint of fluid you should have the cooling system pressure tested for a leak. If you see any obvious fluid loss on the ground or in the engine compartment, you should also have the system tested for leaks.
Second: If no coolant leak or low fluid level is present, then determine when the overheating complaint occurs.
If the engine overheats while at a stop or idle only:
Most front wheel drive cars use an electric cooling fan motor located in front or behind the radiator. The function of the cooling fan is to improve airflow across the radiator at stops and low speeds. The fan is controlled by sensors that regulate the engine temperature and additional load that might be placed on the engine.
The air conditioning compressor will require the cooling fan to operate at idle as long as the compressor is on. A quick way to check the cooling fan operation is to turn on the air conditioner. The cooling fan should come on with the air conditioner compressor. Some cars will have two electric fans, one is for the radiator and the other is the air conditioner condenser fan. Usually the radiator fan is closer to the middle of the radiator. The radiator fan is responsible for engine cooling, and the condenser fan is responsible for increasing air conditioning efficiency at idle and low speed.
If your vehicle does not have an electric cooling fan on the radiator it will have a belt driven fan blade and fan clutch. This fan should be pulling a large amount of warm to hot air across the radiator onto the engine. What you want to determine with either fan situation is that there is ample airflow across the radiator at idle. The radiator is the primary heat exchange for the engine, and airflow is crucial.
What if the engine overheats while at high speeds on the freeway?
Again, airflow and coolant circulation are crucial. At 55 MPH we can assume you have ample airflow across the radiator, so proper antifreeze circulation is the thing to inspect. I compare overheating at 55MPH to jogging with a sock in your mouth. The faster and longer you jog, the more air you are going to require, and with a sock in your mouth you are going to have to breath extra hard to maintain the proper amount of air to keep you going. At 55MPH the water pump is pumping a large amount of hot antifreeze throughout the cooling system.
If there is a restriction in the system like a kinked radiator hose, a restricted radiator, or a stuck thermostat, it will produce the same affect as the sock in the mouth scenario. Rust and water calcification can accumulate in the radiator and drastically reduce the flow of coolant at high speeds. Removing the radiator from the vehicle for disassembly and cleaning or radiator replacement are the only two real cures for a clogged radiator.
Using a can of "radiator flush" additive might help as preventive maintenance, but will probably just be a waste of time and money trying to correct a restricted radiator.

Hope this helps, best regards.

Nov 21, 2009 | 2001 Lincoln LS

1 Answer

My 2003 ford focus is over heating quickly especially when i am sitting at a light, then when i turn the air conditioner on it overheats more


1. Does the cooling fan turn on when it over heats?
2. Check your coolant level, if it is a little low it will cool normally under transit and over heat in the conditions you are describing. Also have your coolant check for proper dilution.
3. If your cooling fan is failing to turn on you may have a coolant temperature switch issue.

Jun 06, 2009 | 2000 Ford Focus

1 Answer

Heater not working


I would check if your vent to the outside is open. If it is I would check the vacum hose that controls the vent to open and close.

Jan 27, 2009 | 2001 Saturn SL

1 Answer

2001 ford focus


the cooling fan will always come on when using the a/c,so it is not a fan problem,sounds like the pcm is not getting a signal to turn cooling fan on,could be coolant temp sensor.

Nov 01, 2008 | 2004 Ford Focus

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