Question about 2008 Audi Q7

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I need to change my left front lower control arm.vehicle has height adjustable shocks.is there a basic setting that i should put the car in before i remove the arm?i dont want the shock to be unevenly adjusted after the replacement

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The shocker will self adjust, dependant on load in/on car.(trailer etc)
just take off and replace as is.

Posted on Aug 19, 2010

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Steps to replace 2007 dodge dakota tront shocks from strut spring assembly


Hello Russell,

If you replacing the front struts as an assembly the springs will be equipped and ready to install.

If your purchasing the strut assembly without the coil springs you will need a spring compressor.

  1. Before servicing the vehicle a service manual for safety precautions should be consulted.
  2. Raise and support the vehicle.
  3. Remove the tire and wheel assembly.
  4. Support the lower control arm outboard end.
  5. Remove the upper shock nuts.
  6. Remove the stabilizer link lower nut and then separate the stabilizer link from the lower control arm to gain access to the lower shock bolt.
  7. Remove the lower shock bolt.
  8. Remove the shock.
To install:
  1. Install the upper part of the shock into the frame bracket.
  2. Install the nuts. Tighten to 45 ft. lbs. (61 Nm).
  3. Install the lower part of the shock into the lower control arm. Tighten the bolt to 155 ft. lbs. (210 Nm).
  4. Install the stabilizer link lower nut to the lower control arm.
  5. Remove the support from the lower control arm outboard end.
  6. Install the tire and wheel assembly.
  7. Remove the support and lower the vehicle.

Jul 27, 2016 | Dodge Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Ttrying to fine out where to put the air for the airshock


Vehicles: Cadillacs with ALC-controlled rear shock absorbers

Each rear shock absorber has an ALC (air) port. One may disconnect the ALC air line and try to add air, but this is unlikely to work, since there is no spring-loaded valve to close the port off immediately (like a tire).

A better method for inflating the rear shocks to see if they hold air is to supply 12V DC (from the battery) directly to the ALC system (air) compressor.

Debugging your Cadillac's ALC system can be a challenge. Here are a few basics.

Here's a depiction of the ALC port on the rear shock - found at the end of the ALC air tube.


12_2_2011_12_54_42_am.jpg

Fig. 1 The ALC connection on the rear shock absorber

Here's a close-up of the Cadillac ALC port on the rear shock


12_2_2011_12_59_49_am.jpg

Fig.2 Cadillac ALC air line fitting

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Automatic Level Control System - General Description
Vehicles Without Road Sensing Suspension

The Automatic Level Control (ALC) system automatically adjusts the rear height of the vehicle in response to changes in vehicle loading.

The ALC system consists of a height sensor, an air compressor assembly, an ALC compressor relay, an intake hose and filter, an air tube, and two rear shock absorbers . The air compressor assembly consists of an air compressor and an air dryer mounted on a bracket. The air compressor head is a replaceable part of the air compressor. The (air) exhaust solenoid is a non-replaceable part of the air compressor head.

The compressor is activated when the ignition is on, and weight is added to the vehicle. The exhaust solenoid is connected directly to the battery (+), enabling the system to exhaust with the ignition on or off when excess weight is removed.

Vehicles With Road Sensing Suspension
The Automatic Level Control (ALC) system automatically adjusts the rear height of the vehicle in response to changes in vehicle loading.

The ALC system consists of the CVRSS control module, two CVRSS position sensors, an air compressor assembly, an ALC compressor relay, an intake hose and filter, an air tube, and two rear shock absorbers. The air compressor assembly consists of an air compressor and an air dryer mounted on a bracket. The air compressor head is a replaceable part of the air compressor. The exhaust solenoid is a non-replaceable part of the air compressor head.

The vehicles rear vertical height is measured by the two CVRSS position sensors. These two position sensors convert this rear height measurement into an analog voltage (0 to 5 volts DC) which is read by the CVRSS control module. The control module then determines what action (exhaust, compress, or no action) shall take place. To compress, the CVRSS control module switches the low-side of the ELC compressor relay to ground.

The air compressor is enabled (switched to battery only when the ignition is on. The air compressor is activated when a sufficient amount of weight has been added to the vehicle.

The exhaust solenoid is enabled at all times. The exhaust solenoid is activated when weight is removed from the vehicle.

Automatic Level Control System Operation w/o F45

Raising the Vehicle
When a load is added to the vehicle, the vehicle body moves down causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate upward. The upward arm movement activates an internal timing circuit and, after an initial fixed delay of 17 to 27 seconds, the sensor provides a ground to complete the compressor relay circuit. The 12V (+) circuit to the compressor is then complete and the compressor runs, sending pressurized air to the shock absorbers through the air tubes.

As the shock absorbers inflate, the vehicle body moves upward rotating the actuating arm towards its original position. Once the body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the sensor opens the compressor relay circuit, and the compressor is turned off.

Air Compressor Head Relief Sequence
In order to reduce current draw during air compressor starting, the height sensor performs an air compressor head relief sequence before air compressor operation. This sequence reduces the air pressure in the air compressor cylinder during start-up. The air compressor head relief sequence occurs as follows:

Exhaust solenoid is energized.
Air compressor is activated 1.3 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is energized.
Exhaust solenoid is de-energized 0.5 seconds after the air compressor is activated.
Lowering the Vehicle
When a load is removed from the rear of the vehicle, the body rises, causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate downward. This again activates the internal timing circuit. After the initial fixed delay, the sensor provides a ground to complete the exhaust solenoid circuit, energizing the solenoid. Now, air starts exhausting out of the shock absorbers, back through the air dryer and exhaust solenoid valve, and into the atmosphere.

As the vehicle body lowers, the actuating arm rotates to its original position. When the vehicle body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the sensor opens the exhaust solenoid circuit, which closes the exhaust solenoid and prevents air from escaping.

Air Replenishment Cycle
The sensor actuating arm position is checked when the ignition is turned on. If the sensor indicates that no height adjustment is needed, an internal timer circuit is activated. After about 35 to 55 seconds, the compressor is turned on for 3 to 5 seconds. This ensures that the shock absorbers are filled with the proper residual pressure. If weight is added to or removed from the vehicle during the time delay, the air replenishment cycle is overridden, and the vehicle rises or lowers after the normal delay.

Automatic Level Control System Operation w/ F45

Raising the Vehicle
When a load is added to the vehicle, the vehicle body moves down causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate upward. The upward arm movement activates an internal timing circuit and, after an initial fixed delay, the CVRSS control module provides a ground to complete the compressor relay circuit. The 12V (+) circuit to the compressor is then complete and the compressor runs, sending pressurized air to the shock absorbers through the air tubes.

As the shock absorbers inflate, the vehicle body moves upward rotating the actuating arm towards its original position. Once the body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the compressor relay circuit is opened and the compressor is turned off.

Air Compressor Head Relief Sequence
In order to reduce current draw during air compressor starting, the CVRSS control module performs an air compressor head relief sequence before air compressor operation. This sequence reduces the air pressure in the air compressor cylinder during start-up. The air compressor head relief sequence occurs as follows:

Exhaust solenoid is energized.
Air compressor is activated 1.3 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is energized.
Exhaust solenoid is de-energized 0.5 seconds after the air compressor is activated.

Lowering the Vehicle
When a load is removed from the rear of the vehicle, the body rises, causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate downward. This again activates the internal timing circuit. After the initial fixed delay, the CVRSS control module provides a ground to complete the exhaust solenoid circuit, energizing the solenoid. Now, air starts exhausting out of the shock absorbers, back through the air dryer and exhaust solenoid valve, and into the atmosphere.

As the vehicle body lowers, the actuating arm rotates to its original position. When the vehicle body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the exhaust solenoid circuit is opened, which closes the exhaust solenoid and prevents air from escaping.

Air Replenishment Cycle
An air replenishment cycle (ARC) is commanded after each ignition-ON cycle. The purpose of the ARC is to ensure that the ALC system is operating at or above minimum air pressure (residual air pressure). The ARC occurs as follows:

The EXHAUST SOLENOID IS ENERGIZED 20 seconds after the ignition has been turned on.
The AIR COMPRESSOR IS ACTIVATED 1.3 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is energized.
The EXHAUST SOLENOID IS DE-ENERGIZED 0.5 seconds after the air compressor is activated.
The AIR COMPRESSOR IS DEACTIVATED 3.2 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is de-energized.

Dec 01, 2011 | 1998 Cadillac DeVille

2 Answers

I want to know how to fix the alignment on my 1995 honda accord ex.


Before making wheel alignment adjustment, perform the following checks:
  1. Tires should be equal in size and runout must not be excessive. Tires and wheels should be in balance, and inflated to manufacturer's specifications.

  2. Wheel bearings must be properly adjusted. Steering linkage and suspension must not have excessive looseness. Check for wear in tie rod ends and ball joints.
  3. Steering gear box must not have excessive play. Check and adjust to manufacturer's specifications.
  4. Vehicle must be at curb height with full fuel load and spare tire in vehicle. No extra load should be on vehicle.
  5. Vehicle must be level with floor and with suspension settled. Jounce front and rear of vehicle several times and allow it to settle to normal curb height.
  6. If steering wheel is not centered with front wheels in straight-ahead position, correct by shortening one tie rod adjusting sleeve and lengthening opposite sleeve equal amounts.
  7. Ensure wheel lug nuts are tightened to torque specifications
Ride Height Adjustment

Before adjusting alignment, check riding height. Riding height must be checked with vehicle on level floor and tires properly inflated. Passenger and luggage compartments must be unloaded. Bounce vehicle several times, and allow suspension to settle. Visually inspect vehicle from front to rear and from side to side for signs of abnormal height.
Measure riding height. See figure. Riding height between left and right sides of vehicle should vary less than 1′ (25.4 mm). If riding height is not within specification, check suspension components and repair or replace them as necessary.
Wheel Alignment Procedures

Honda recommends using commercially available computerized 4-wheel alignment equipment. Follow equipment manufacturer instructions to obtain vehicle alignment settings. Use following procedures for necessary adjustments.
Civic Camber Adjustment
Compare camber settings with vehicle manufacturer recommendations. If camber is incorrect, check for bent or damaged front suspension components. Replace faulty components. Recheck camber.
Civic Caster Adjustment
DO NOT use more than 2 shims. If more than 2 shims are required to adjust caster angle, check for bent or damaged suspension components.
Compare caster settings with vehicle manufacturer recommendations. If caster is incorrect, check for bent or damaged front suspension components. Replace faulty components. Recheck caster.
Civic Toe-In Adjustment

  1. Secure steering wheel in straight-ahead position. Measure front wheel toe-in. If adjustment is needed, loosen tie rod lock nuts. Turn both tie rods equally in the same direction until front wheels are in straight-ahead position and toe-in reading is correct. Tighten tie rod lock nuts. Reposition tie rod boots if twisted.
  2. Ensure parking brake is released. Check rear wheel toe-in. If adjustment is needed, hold adjusting bolt on rear compensator arm and loosen lock nut. See figure. Adjust rear toe-in by sliding rear control arm until rear toe-in is correct. Install NEW lock nut, and tighten it while holding adjusting bolt.
Wheel Alignment Specifications

  • Camber - Measurement in degrees.
    • Front: 0 (range -1 to 1)
    • Rear: 0.33 (range -1.33 to 0.67)
  • Caster - Measurement in degrees.
    • 1.17 (range 0.17 to 2.17)
  • Toe-In - Measurement in inches (mm).
    • Front: -0 (0)
    • Rear: 0.08 (2.0)
  • Toe-In - Measurement in degrees.
    • Front: 0.00 (range - 0.16 to 0.16)
  • Toe-Out On Turns - Measurement in degrees.
    • Inner: 41.00
    • Outer: 33.50
Torque Specifications Ft. Lbs (N.m)

  • Rear Control Arm Adjusting Bolt: 48 (65)
  • Spindle Nut: 136 (185)
  • Tie Rod Lock Nut: 41 (55)
  • Wheel Lug Nuts: 80 (108)
hope this helps you out.

May 09, 2011 | 1995 Honda Accord

2 Answers

My daughter ran her 98 Civic EX into a ditch flattening the front tire on the right front and bending the entire rear left wheel inward. I replaced to lower control arm in the rear, but now the car has...


not a lower control arm problem
the wheel alignment guy is not lying

the front wheel drive only has tow in toe out adjustments
no camber adjustments
the frame is pre stressed at manufacture set at zero

if the shock tower frame on any front wheel drive gets bent up.... even a little bit
the camber will be way out
even front ride height may be way out on each front side

too dangerous to drive
the car is a write off


only good to sell for parts or buy the same model and swap over its good bits

if you like the car a lot
to correct the damage needs the front chassis stripped back to frame and put on a frame straightenerd47f961b-7315-43ab-a146-e3069f36ad5f.jpg

Apr 28, 2017 | 1998 Honda Civic

1 Answer

My Front left tire is tilted inward and underneath the truck i found one of the support bars that run's across is broken off on the left side. I looked around the wheel and found that no metal was bent so...


General Description
The front suspension allows each wheel to compensate for changes in the road surface without affecting the opposite wheel. Each wheel independently connects to the frame with a steering knuckle, ball joint assemblies, and upper and lower control arms.
The control arms specifically allow the steering knuckles to move in a three-dimensional arc. Two tie rods connect to steering arms on the knuckles and an intermediate rod. These operate the front wheels.
The two-wheel drive vehicles have coil chassis springs. These springs are mounted between the spring housings on the frame and the lower control arms. Double, direct acting shock absorbers are inside the coil springs. The coil springs attach to the lower control arms and offer ride control.
The upper part of each shock absorber extends through the upper control arm frame bracket. This bracket has two grommets, two grommet retainers, and a nut.
A spring stabilizer shaft controls the side roll of the front suspension. This shaft is mounted in rubber bushings that are held by brackets to the frame side rails. The ends of the stabilizer shaft connect to the lower control arms with link bolts. Rubber grommets isolate these link bolts. Rubber bushings attach the upper control arm to a cross shaft. Frame brackets bolt the cross shaft.
A ball joint assembly is riveted to the outer end of the upper control arm. A rubber spring in the control arm assures that the ball seats properly in the socket. A castellated nut and a cotter pin join the steering knuckle to the upper ball joint.
The inner ends of the lower control arm have pressed-in bushings. The bolts pass through the bushings and join the arm to the frame. The lower ball joint assembly is a press fit in the lower control arm and attaches to the steering knuckle with a castellated nut and a cotter pin.
Ball socket assemblies have rubber grease seals. These seals prevent entry of moisture and dirt and damage to the bearing surfaces.
Four-wheel drive models have a front suspension that consists of the control arms, a stabilizer bar, a shock absorber, and right and left torsion bars. The torsion bars replace the conventional coil springs. The lower control arm attaches to the front end of the torsion bar. The rear end of the torsion bar mounts on an adjustable arm at the crossmember. This arm adjustment controls the vehicle trim height.
Two-wheel drive vehicles have tapered roller sheel bearings. These bearings are adjustible and need lubrication.
Four-wheel drive models and RWD Utilities have sealed front-wheel bearings. These bearings are pre-adjusted and need no lubrication.
Heat treatment may create darkened areas on the bearing assembly. This discoloration does not signal a need for replacement.
Hope this helps?

Jun 27, 2017 | 1999 Chevrolet S-10 Pickup

1 Answer

Recently had new idler arms installed along with new shocks all around. Van now seems unstable...sways. Could torsion bars need adjusting?


When you change the two idler arms did you have the front end aligned? It could be possible that the alignment is off. If you are having to put alot of input to the steering wheel while driving that may give you the sway feeling you are describing. The torsion bars control front ride height and should be checked as part of the alignment. Hope this helps.

Oct 15, 2010 | 1998 GMC Safari

1 Answer

How to change 2007 dodge 1500 front struts?


Removal & Installation Independent Front Suspension – 2WD Vehicles To Remove:
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions at the beginning of this section.
  2. Safely raise and support the vehicle.
  3. Support the lower control arm outboard end.
  4. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Upper shock absorber nut, retainer and grommet
    • Lower nuts and shock absorber
To Install:
  1. Install or connect the following:
    • Lower retainer and grommet on the shock absorber stud and insert shock absorber through frame bracket hole
    • Lower nuts
      1. Torque to: 25 ft. lbs. (34 Nm)
    • Upper grommet, retainer and new nut (or existing nut with Mopar Lock N Seal or Loctiti 242) on the shock absorber stud
      1. Torque to: 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm)
  2. Remove support from lower control arm outboard end.
  3. Lower the vehicle.
Independent Front Suspension – 4WD Vehicles To Remove:
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions at the beginning of this section.
  2. Safely raise and support the vehicle.
  3. Remove tire and wheel assembly.
  4. Support the lower control arm outboard end.
  5. Remove or disconnect the following: dod_ram15_02-04_4wd_shock.gif

    • Upper shock nut with insulator and retainer
    • Lower shock bolt
    • Shock absorber
To Install:
  1. Install or connect the following:
    • Upper part of shock absorber into frame bracket with insulators and retainers and nut
      1. Torque to: 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm)
    • Lower part of shock absorber into lower control arm with the bolt
      1. Torque to: 100 ft. lbs. (135 Nm)
  2. Remove support from lower control arm.
  3. Install tire and wheel assembly.
  4. Lower the vehicle.
Link/Coil Front Suspension To Remove:
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions at the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Nut, retainer, and grommet from upper stud in engine compartment dod_ram15_02-04_shock.gif

    • Nuts from upper shock bracket
  3. Lower bolt from axle bracket and shock absorber from engine compartment
To Install:
  1. Position lower retainer and grommet on upper stud and insert the shock through the spring from the engine compartment.
  2. Install or connect the following:
    • Lower bolt
      1. Torque to: 100 ft. lbs. (135 Nm)
    • Upper shock bracket and nuts
      1. Torque to: 55 ft. lbs. (75 Nm)
    • Upper grommet, retainer and upper shock absorber nut
      1. Torque to: 35 ft. lbs. (47 Nm)
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Jul 22, 2010 | 2007 Dodge Ram Truck

1 Answer

How to replace front shock bsorbers


This is for the 2WD model:

2-Wheel Drive
  1. Raise and support the front of the vehicle safely using jack stands.
  2. Using an open end wrench, hold the shock absorber upper stem to prevent it from turning, then remove the upper stem retaining nut, the retainer and rubber grommet.
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Common front shock absorber mounting-2WD vehicles

  1. Remove the shock absorber-to-lower control arm retaining bolts and lower the shock absorber assembly from the bottom of the control arm.
  2. Inspect and test the shock absorber; replace it, if necessary.
To install:
  1. Fully extend the shock absorber stem, then push it up through the lower control arm and spring so that the upper stem passes through the mounting hole in the upper control arm frame bracket.
  2. Install the upper shock absorber nut and tighten to 100 inch. lbs. (11 Nm) on 1994 models 145 inch lbs. (16 Nm) on 1995 models, 54 ft. lbs. (73 Nm) on 1996 models, or 106 inch lbs. (12 Nm) on 1997-99 models while holding the stem with an open end wrench. Be careful not to crush the rubber bushing.
  3. Install the shock absorber-to-lower control arm retaining bolts and tighten to 20 ft. lbs. (27 Nm) on 1994-95 models and 54 ft. lbs. (73 Nm) on 1996 models, or 22 ft. lbs. (30 Nm) on 1997-99 models.
  4. Remove the jack stands and carefully lower the vehicle.

Nov 01, 2009 | 1998 Chevrolet S-10 Pickup

1 Answer

Replacing front struts


Okay....here is the steps first....and then the directions on how to use the tools:

  1. Raise and properly support the vehicle.
  2. Remove the front wheel.
  3. Detach the shock absorber lower mount by removing the two bolts.
  4. Remove the retainer nut, retainer, cushion and shock absorber.
  5. Detach the cushion retainer from the shock absorber.
  6. Compress the coil spring with a commercially available spring compressor.
  7. Detach the stabilizer bar.
  8. Support the upper suspension arm and steering knuckle securely.
  9. Remove the cotter pin.
  10. Loosen and remove the nut.
  11. Using a ball joint removal tool, detach the lower ball joint from the lower control arm.
  12. Loosen the suspension arm set bolt.
  13. Remove the suspension arm set bolt nut.
  14. Remove the nut from the strut bar front set bolt.
  15. Pull out both set bolts.
  16. Remove the lower suspension arm and coil spring. To install:
  17. Installation is the reverse of removal. Note the following torque specifications:
    1. Strut bar front set bolt: 221 ft. lbs. (300 Nm)
    2. Lower suspension arm set bolt: 148 ft. lbs. (200 Nm)
    3. Lower ball joint nut: 80 ft. lbs. (110 Nm)
    4. Lug nuts: 83 ft. lbs. (110 Nm).

May 13, 2009 | 1998 Toyota Tacoma

1 Answer

How to change lower ball joints


part of lower arm assembly only.

Installation
  1. Inspect lower ball joint boots and seals for damage and replace if required. Lower ball joint and seal is part of front suspension lower arm and must be replaced as an assembly.
  1. NOTE: Do not tighten the front suspension lower arm bolts and nuts to the specified torque until the end of assembly. Install nuts and tighten until snug.

    Position the front suspension lower arm in the front crossmember. Install the bolts. Install the nuts and tighten until snug.
  1. Install torsion bar. Refer to Torsion Bar in this section.
  1. Raise the front suspension lower arm to allow installation of front suspension lower arm ball joint into spindle bore.
  1. Lower front suspension lower arm with a jack while making sure lower ball joint is seated in spindle bore. Install the lower ball joint attaching nut and tighten to 113-153 Nm (82-113 lb-ft). Install a new cotter pin.
  1. Raise vehicle. Position the front shock absorber and install the nut/washer/bushing assembly. Tighten nut to 40-55 Nm (30-40 lb-ft).
  1. Install the two nuts attaching the front shock absorber to the lower control arm and tighten to 21-29 Nm (15-21 lb-ft).
  1. NOTE: Front suspension lower arms must be in the horizontal or curb position (vehicle on the ground) when tightening the front stabilizer bar link bolts. Use jackstands to raise the front suspension lower arms to the horizontal position or lower the vehicle to the ground (curb position).

    Lower the vehicle to the ground.
  1. Connect the stabilizer bar link bolt to the front suspension lower arm and tighten to 13-17 Nm (10-13 lb-ft).
  1. Tighten nuts and front suspension lower arm bolts to the No. 1 crossmember to 150-200 Nm (111-148 lb-ft).
  1. Check ride height and align as necessary. Refer to Section 04-00 .
  1. Lower the vehicle.

Apr 17, 2009 | 1996 Ford Explorer

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