Question about Honda Accord

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I have a 97 Honda Accord. Recently I just replaced both cv axles, the upper and lower ball joints, and also the tie rod ends... After putting the car back together I realized my steering doesn't recenter. I can pull my steering wheel all the way to the right then let go and my car will just do circles. When I turn the wheel it doesn't feel stiff or have any resistance at all, so I don't think it's the power steering. Not sure what's wrong, please help!

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The most common reason for this problem is that you haven't got a proper tie rod adjustment. The tie rods need to be adjusted so that you have the same distance. You can use a standard tape measure and with the car on a flat level surface with the tires straight, have a friend help you measure from the one wheel to the other. You need to measure from the front of the tire using the same reference points on both tires ( like the farthest outside tread groove.) once you have the measurement on the front of the tires then move to the back side of the tires and measure again, using the same reference points, the outside tread groove. The measurements should be within 3/ 16 of an inch and should be slightly shorter in the front. For example if you measured the front @ 4' 41/2" then the back of the tire should be from 4' 4 1/2" to 4' 11/16". The front wheels will be slightly toed in of pointing at each other but no more then 3/ 16 of an inch. If you measurement are off then you will need to adjust the tie rods to get a even measurement. Also you may find that your steering wheel is off center if you don't have them adjusted correctly.
I would really recommend that you just take this and have an alignment done, they are relatively inexpensive considering you have replaced the tie rods and this will make for easy adjustment.

Posted on Aug 07, 2010

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My front axle is rubbing and tearing my boot why


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Have replaced all tie rods; inner&outer;struts&upper mounts;sway bar bushings & links;lower control arms with ball joints& passenger side upper motor mount.none of these have changed this noise even s


What noise? And year and make of car?
A clicking noise on turns is a worn CV joint on the axle shafts. A grinding noise at one of the wheels could be a wheel bearing. Worn brake pads may cause squealing, screeching other high pitched noise.

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2000 gmc z71 passenger side cv joint is making noise when i turn......i talk to napa and can get rebuilt for 60$.....but to take it apart....do i need ball joint separator.....what tools..????


Never use a tool myself other than a big hammer. Those forks don't work for me, though we have them. Hit the joint on the side and it will pop out. If not, you can always put the nut back on even with the ball stud and hit it from the bottom. The book also calls for a special tool to get the axle out of the hub. Have never used this either. If it doesn't slide out, I just hit it--I have a new one anyway (take it loose from the tranny before hitting it). Tools you will need are the big socket for the axle nut (around 22mm or so) and regular metric socket set, preferably 1/2 in drive. Also take the speed sensor and brake lines off the support bracket to free up the hub a little more. Note that you may need to also separate the tie rod end if you cannot otherwise swing the hub out far enough to get the shaft out. The book says to take off the stabilizer and shock and also separate the upper ball joint. I don't know if that's necessary or not, as I have not done one on this particular truck. You are doing the whole shaft, right? We don't do individual CVs anymore, as the labor is ridiculous compared to the cost difference to a whole half shaft. Take the axle nut off, unbolt the shaft from the tranny, and swing the hub out. Pull the axle out of the hub first, then the tranny. Reverse procedure to install. I will paste the book solution from autozone.com below. Lemme know if you have more questions.

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:

    Front wheel and tire assembly Skid plate, as required. If equipped Drive axle hub nut and washer Brake line and wheel speed sensor support bracket from the upper control arm to allow extra travel of the control arm. Left outer tie rod attaching nut and cotter pin. Separate the tie rod from the steering knuckle
  3. Position the tie rod aside and push steering linkage to the opposite side of the vehicle.

    Lower shock attaching nut and bolt; position the shock aside Left stabilizer bar bracket and bushing at the frame Stabilizer bar bolt, spacer and bushings at the lower control arm
  4. Taking pressure off the upper control arm by placing a support below the lower control arm between the spring seat and the ball joint.
    NOTE Cover the shock mounting bracket and lower ball joint stud with a towel to prevent the axle boot from tearing during removal and installation.


    Upper ball joint cotter pin and loosen (do not remove) the upper ball joint attaching nut. Separate the ball joint stud from the steering knuckle. Remove the attaching nut.
  5. Separate the axle shaft from the hub and rotor using tool J-28733 or equivalent.

    Axle shaft inner flange bolts and shaft
To install:
  1. Lubricate the axle and hub splines with an approved high temperature wheel bearing grease.
  2. Install or connect the following:

    Axle shaft in the hub Inboard CV-joint-to-flange bolts. Torque the bolts to 60 ft. lbs. (80 Nm). Upper ball joint to steering knuckle. Torque the stud nut to 61 ft. lbs. (83 Nm). New cotter pin through the upper ball joint stud and nut, lubricate the ball joint as required. Left stabilizer bar bracket and bushing at the frame Stabilizer bar bolt, spacer and bushings at the lower control arm Lower shock in the mount bracket and the attaching nut and bolt Left tie rod end at the steering knuckle. Torque the nut to 35 ft. lbs. (47 Nm). New cotter pin through the tie rod stud and nut Brake line bracket to the control arm, ensuring the line and/or hose is not twisted or kinked Skid plate, as required Axle hub washer and nut. Insert a drift through the rotor vanes to keep the axle from turning. Toque the hub nut to 180 ft. lbs. (245 Nm) Wheel and tire assembly

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Resurfacing front rotors


This tutorial will help you : http://www.ehow.com/how_4719219_off-brake-rotors.html
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1 Answer

If a honda accord 2004 gives aknocking sound


Hi,

Thanks for writing to Fixya.com.

There are various reasons for this. One could be your CV axle going bad, your tie rod joint has gone bad, your lower ball joint has gone bad. More than likely it will be your CV axle. What you need to look for is rips on any of the boots for these parts. Just check for grease coming out of any of these parts and you will find your culprit because it has dried up and is causing the knocking sound.

Thanks for contacting Fixya and please accept the solution if it has helped you.

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Changing cvc joints 1997 accord


replace the entire CV axles. Support vehicle with jackstands by frame. Remove front wheels. Remove axle nuts. Remove lower balljoint nut. Separate balljoint from nuckle by banging hard with ball peen hammer on knuckle on spindle assy. Remove outer tie-rod nut. Separate tie-rod from steering nuckle by bangin on nuckle with ball-peen hammer. Use long pry bar to hold lower control arm down while simultaneously pulling hub/spindle assembly away from vehicle and pushing axle through hub toward transaxle. Go under vehicle and pry inner cv joint away from transaxle while holding axle assembly.
Install new CV axle in reverse of the disassembly.

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