Question about Ford Taurus

3 Answers

1995 Ford Taurus. No power at plug of EEC-IV module. Engine coolant temperature switch reads 25,000 ohms between the pins when engine cold and gradually decreases to 500 ohms when engine hot. Integrated relay contol assembly contacts look OK and plug fits tightly. I don't have a wiring diagram for this system. What the most likely source of this problem?

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  • francisfloyd Aug 04, 2010

    Thanks, I'll give it a try.

  • francisfloyd Aug 06, 2010

    I can't find a black wire with green tracer at the ignition switch. I find a green with white tracer and a green with orange tracer and a green with black tracer. I find a black with green tracer at the EEC plug, but it just goes to ground at the cross brace at he front of the engine just above the radiator.

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3 Answers

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  • Master
  • 662 Answers

What is the vehicel proble, you have indicated the sensor issues, but what is the vehicle doing.......is it hard to start, not starting, overheating, just to get an overview of the problem that you are trying to fix.

Posted on Aug 09, 2010

  • 3 more comments 
  • Luke Bradford
    Luke Bradford Aug 09, 2010

    what i meant to write was vehicle problem......haha.......just as a mechanical piece of knowledge.......the engine coolant temperature switch reading s that you are getting are normal.



    The coolant sensor/switch is called a NTC sensor. It stands for Negative Temperature Co-efficient. Simply, what this means that as the temperature goes up, the resistance goes down, and vice-versa. So at cold/cool, the resistance will be the highest....and as the engine warms up, the resistance will decrease, so this sensor is acting normally, hence, the reason why I am not sure what you are concerned about.......



    More info and I can help you.

  • francisfloyd Aug 12, 2010

    elshaddai159
    6 days ago
    Ok,

    This is what you need to check.

    Check that you have power supply from the PCM to the CCRM which is mounted on top of the radiator support brace just in front of the radiator.
    You should have power to terminal 197 or the Tan/orange wire.

    Then check you have power coming from the CCRM color wires are brown/orange trace there are 2 of them.
    And also power from the dark Blue wire, now either of these will supply power but just depends on what the heat range is so either one with power coming out should have the fan working.

    You need to refit the temp. switch as this is ok.The signal from the temp switch go's to the PCM and then from the PCM to the CCRM.
    If there is no voltage output from the Tan/orange trace wire then you have a faulty PCM or the Powertrain Control module.

    Let me know.
    Reply

    francisfloyd
    3 days ago
    with the temp switch reconnected and the ignition switch in run position and the CCRN plug disconnected, I have power coming in on lower front plug pin 13 (color looks red and green but could be orange and tan). There is also power on pins 12 and 8 (two yellow wires). With plug connected I have no power on the brown wires with orange trace or the blue wire. When the plug is being disconnected/reconnected, I can hear relays clicking inside the CCRN.

  • Luke Bradford
    Luke Bradford Aug 12, 2010

    with all of this information to help you diagnose, im not sure what the original problem is......did it start off as a engine light on....and then no pwer at module or other....



    what you find in the automotive industry when diagnosis occurs that you can get too far into the problem to cloud the orignal problem, and you end up going round in circles.......



    so unfortunately lets start at the beginning and tell me what is happemning with the vehicle........or what was the origanl problem that was started off at

  • francisfloyd Aug 12, 2010

    The engine was overheating because the fan wouldn't run. A voltage check disclosed there was no power getting to the fan. The fan would operate when connected directly to the battery.

  • Luke Bradford
    Luke Bradford Aug 12, 2010

    ok....thats for starters, thank you for filling that gap in......so i assume that mechanically the engine is good, the coolant is at full and you do not hear gurgling sound when the car stops from the cooling system, and you have checked for compression in case it is a head gasket concern, as sometimes fans do not cut in becuase they are not "told to" by the ecu, because you have 2 sensors, one is for the ecu and one is for the gauge....so i hope that you are testing the right one.........i will check my wiring diagrams and see what i can come up with

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  • Master
  • 1,016 Answers

Hi,

What is actually happening with the vehicle?
Is it a cooling problem like the fans not work or is it something else?

Let me know and I can give you a specific answer.

Posted on Aug 05, 2010

  • 9 more comments 
  • francisfloyd Aug 06, 2010

    Elecric radiator cooling fan doesn't operate. There is no power at at the EEC-IV plug. Engine coolant temperature switch reads across pins 25,000 ohms with engine cold and 500 ohms with engine hot. First Guru recommended checking ignition switch and black/green wire at ignition switch for being open. I can't find a black wire with green tracer at the ignition switch. The only black/green wire at the integrated relay control assembly goes to ground ar the cross member above the radiator.

  • Jason Maurirere
    Jason Maurirere Aug 06, 2010

    Hi,

    When you disconnect the sensor does that fans switch on or do they not operate.

    When you disconnect the Thermoswitch for the fans they should switch on.


  • francisfloyd Aug 06, 2010

    The only time the fan (there is only one) operates is when I hook it directly to the battery. And when I do that the fan motor overheats. I have even jumpered out the plug at the engine coolant temperature switch and still no voltage at the fan plug.

  • francisfloyd Aug 06, 2010

    The only time the fan (there is only one) operates is when I hook it directly to the battery. And when I do that the fan motor overheats. I have even jumpered out the plug at the engine coolant temperature switch and still no voltage at the fan plug.

  • francisfloyd Aug 06, 2010

    The only time the fan (there is only one) operates is when I hook it directly to the battery. And when I do that the fan motor overheats. I have even jumpered out the plug at the engine coolant temperature switch and still no voltage at the fan plug.

  • Jason Maurirere
    Jason Maurirere Aug 06, 2010

    Ok,

    This is what you need to check.

    Check that you have power supply from the PCM to the CCRM which is mounted on top of the radiator support brace just in front of the radiator.
    You should have power to terminal 197 or the Tan/orange wire.

    Then check you have power coming from the CCRM color wires are brown/orange trace there are 2 of them.
    And also power from the dark Blue wire, now either of these will supply power but just depends on what the heat range is so either one with power coming out should have the fan working.

    You need to refit the temp. switch as this is ok.The signal from the temp switch go's to the PCM and then from the PCM to the CCRM.
    If there is no voltage output from the Tan/orange trace wire then you have a faulty PCM or the Powertrain Control module.

    Let me know.


  • francisfloyd Aug 09, 2010

    with the temp switch reconnected and the ignition switch in run position and the CCRN plug disconnected, I have power coming in on lower front plug pin 13 (color looks red and green but could be orange and tan). There is also power on pins 12 and 8 (two yellow wires). With plug connected I have no power on the brown wires with orange trace or the blue wire. When the plug is being disconnected/reconnected, I can hear relays clicking inside the CCRN.

  • Jason Maurirere
    Jason Maurirere Aug 11, 2010

    Hi,

    Sorry for the late reply, what has happened is you fan motor has to much current draw this is why it overheats when you connect it directly to the power supply.

    This is the first problem and you will need to replace this first.

    If the fans work now then everything else will be fine, but if not then the old fan has burnt the contacts in the CCRM so you will need to replace this also.

    Because you got the power supplies in to it but nothing is coming out.

    Let me know how you get on.


  • Jason Maurirere
    Jason Maurirere Aug 16, 2010

    Hi did you get my last solution about the cause of the fans overheating?



  • francisfloyd Aug 17, 2010

    The CCRM smells burned.

  • Jason Maurirere
    Jason Maurirere Aug 17, 2010

    Like previous solution I gave you that the CCRM would be one of the first things that would cause this, but due to your fans probably having a short in them, then this is what would have burnt out theCCRM.



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  • Ford Master
  • 11,800 Answers

The ignition key switch is malfunctioning or the wire from him to the module is interrupted - check them with the ohmmeter.

Posted on Aug 04, 2010

  • 13 more comments 
  • francisfloyd Aug 04, 2010

    How do you know which wire is the correct wire at the ignition switch and which is the correct one at the module? What is the color code or other way that I can recognize it so I can put my meter on it?

  • francisfloyd Aug 04, 2010

    How do you know which wire is the correct wire at the ignition switch and which is the correct one at the module? What is the color code or other way that I can recognize it so I can put my meter on it?

  • francisfloyd Aug 04, 2010

    How do you know which wire is the correct wire at the ignition switch and which is the correct one at the module? What is the color code or other way that I can recognize it so I can put my meter on it?

  • francisfloyd Aug 04, 2010

    How do you know which wire is the correct wire at the ignition switch and which is the correct one at the module? What is the color code or other way that I can recognize it so I can put my meter on it?

  • francisfloyd Aug 04, 2010

    How do you know which wire is the correct wire at the ignition switch and which is the correct one at the module? What is the color code or other way that I can recognize it so I can put my meter on it?

  • francisfloyd Aug 04, 2010

    How do you know which wire is the correct wire at the ignition switch and which is the correct one at the module? What is the color code or other way that I can recognize it so I can put my meter on it?

  • francisfloyd Aug 04, 2010

    How do you know which wire is the correct wire at the ignition switch and which is the correct one at the module? What is the color code or other way that I can recognize it so I can put my meter on it?

  • francisfloyd Aug 04, 2010

    How do you know which wire is the correct one?

  • francisfloyd Aug 04, 2010

    How do you know which wire is the correct wire at the ignition switch and which is the correct one at the module? What is the color code or other way that I can recognize it so I can put my meter on it?

  • Azrael SRL Aug 04, 2010

    Battery Constant 12v+ Positive Wire (+): Yellow
    Accessory Positive Wire (+): Gray/Yellow (1 Of 2 Wires, Use Either Wire)
    Ignition Positive Wire (+): Light Green/Purple (1 Of 2 Wires, Use Either Wire)
    Ignition Positive Wire (+) to ECC: Black/Light Green
    Starter Positive Wire (+): Red/Light Blue


    If your car has a different wire loom colors then find the constant + and then by exclusion the + ignition wire.





  • francisfloyd Aug 04, 2010

    How do I know which wire to check? There are many wires.

  • Azrael SRL Aug 04, 2010

    You must check the positive wire for the ECC = black/light green - that it receiceves the power from the key contact and it delivers it at the ECC. But if you don't know how to do such a simple task then how did you find out that the ECC module doesn't get powered?

  • francisfloyd Aug 04, 2010

    I can do it. Thanks. I'll conduct the test you recommend and report to you the results.

  • Azrael SRL Aug 09, 2010

    In that case you definitely have different wire harness from what i know and you must identify the wire yourself: go back directly at the ignition key, put it in position 1 and test all the wires; put it back on the 2 position and all of the wires that were at 0 before will go hot except one (the starter wire). If one of these wires doesn't go hot then the key switch is defective - replace it. 



    To identify which of these wires go to the EEC module just work by exclusion - only one wire will be common both to the second set of key wires and the module. If you have power when it leaves the key but without when it arrives at the module then the wire is broken - open the wire loom  find out why and replace it.

  • Azrael SRL Aug 10, 2010

    BTW you should use a ohmmeter to check the wirer themselves for breaks or shorts.


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1 Answer

Engine temp sensor bypass or test


WHAT SIZE ENGINE???? ? 4L 2.5L????

ive seen this post many times now.and can not figure it out.
double posted.
what are you trying to do, say that first. or just ask a question
first off,what does bypass mean???? <<very confusing to me...????
This is THE ECT, the ENGINE. Coolant Temperature" sensor.

what do you wish to do with this very critical EFI sensor.???????
just test it.>
Ill guess, you have not read the FSM , as it covers that 2 ways.
the ECT can be tested 3 ways.
ill show 2
1: on car and off car.
1: on car. (is more easy. if strong back)
DMM set to RESISTANCE , aka. ohms. ohmega symbol
the DMM meter is $20 at walfart.
cold car, say at about 50f.
you unplug the ECT connector (2 pin conn)
cold engine it might read, 5000 ohm, this is good,
get engine fully hot. i use a IR pyro gun, it hit 180F or more.
and kill engine.
pull back off the ECT sensor. conn.
and it reads (2 pins 2 meter leads) about 300 ohms.
is this what you want.



first google hit on sensor , but FSM shows truth....
1st hit shows....... its a NTC thermistor with these rules.
212 farenheit 185 ohms
160 farenheit 450 ohms
100 farenheit 1600 ohms
70 farenheit 3400 ohms
40 farenheit 7500 ohms
20 farenheit 13,500 ohms
0 farenheit 25,000 ohms
-40 farenheit 100,700 ohms



the FSM is here
the 93 will be close.

http://www.jeep4x4center.com/knowledge-base/index.htm?utm_source=cj#service

click fuse system there.
click on pdf page number. 46/66 BINGO ECT TESTS>

off car tests are easy, in a pan of room temp water then hot the in
ice water.
i do 3 tests. 32F(ice) 79F (room) and 200F (near boiling)
super easy test. ask how. if any step seems confusing.

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Where is the ECU located on a 1992 ford explorer and what does it do?


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  • Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor
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  • Idle Air Control (IAC) valve
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The EEC microcomputer circuit processes the input signals and produces output control signals to the fuel injectors to regulate fuel discharged to the injectors. It also adjusts ignition spark timing to provide the best balance between driveability and economy, and controls the IAC valve to maintain the proper idle speed.
The EEC is located in the engine compartment. Post your engine size and I can tell you where it's at.

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95 taurus starts runs for 1-2 seconds then dies changed fuel filter 39 psi on fuel rail can make it run longer by cycling ign.switch from off to run really fast but leave it in run and dies after couple...


I would check the EEC relay, and the fuel pump relay too. But it sounds like the ignition module is loosing power, or the pump is not getting power after the engine starts.
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What does check dcl mean


DCL is Data Communincations Link... the communication connection between the computers in the instrument cluster and the rest of the car. its usually caused (99% of the time) by a bad connection.

The Data Communications Link (DCL) is a wiring system that allows the sharing of information between the Electronic Engine Control System (EEC-IV) , the Electronic Instrument Cluster (EIC) and external equipment.

The EEC-IV system transmits the following information through the DCL to the EIC:
Engine RPM.
Engine coolant temperature.
EEC-IV malfunction indication.
Fuel used.

The DCL system transmits Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) information to the EIC. The EIC uses MIL information to generate a CHECK ENGINE warning in the event of an engine sensor failure.

The EIC will display the message "CHECK DCL" on its Message Center Display if it is not receiving data from the EEC-IV. This warning is turned off whenever data communication is restored.

The EEC-IV monitors the Data Communication Link for faults. If a fault occurs in data communication a continuous Memory Code is set in the EEC-IV. The DCL Codes (529 for EEC-IV and 533 for EIC) can occur separately or together. These codes are not immediately cleared when data communication is restored.

The existance of a DCL code does NOT mean that a module has failed. also I would check for an oil leak or coolant leak that would be the cause of the smoking under the car.

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Hey there,i have a 1991 msuatng LX with the 2.3L ho engine running an 8 plug head. it sounds like i may have a misfire of some sort or my timing may be out but im not sure how to tell, could someone give...


Insert each wire on the proper terminal of the ignition coil. Ensure that the coil boots are fully seated and both locking tabs are engaged. The terminals are identified on the ignition coils. Install wires as shown in the illustration. The 2.3L firing order is 1-3-4-2 for both ignition coil assemblies.

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OK,
Have you tried the following:


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  5. Attach the wiring harness connector(s) to the ICM.
  6. Connect the negative battery cable. Fig. 1: Ignition control module and mounting location on the 2.3L, 2.5L engine 89682g32.gif
    Fig. 2: Ignition control module used on all EEC-IV systems except the 2.3L engine 89682g33.gif
    Fig. 3: Ignition control module mounting on all EEC-IV systems except the 2.3L engine 89682g34.gif
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My 1989 Ford Bronco 2 won't start. I just did a radiator flush, I left the flush with water mix sitting in my car after running for twenty minutes. The next day, the vehicle would not start. Does this have...


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Ford EEC-IV Ignition Problem


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