Question about 1984 Ford Bronco II

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RUNNING HOT REPLACED RADIATOR/WATER PUMP/FAN CLUTCH/HOSES.NO WATER IN OIL NO OIL IN WATER NO STEAM FROM EXAUST.

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The only item left that controls the flow of the coolant is the thermostat. It is and usually replaced with the water pump or radiator because it is an inexpensive part. The thermostat blocks the flow of coolant until the vehicle warms up to the thermostats specified temperate recommended by the vehicle manufacture then opens to allow flow of coolant.

Posted on Aug 02, 2010

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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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I have a 1992 buick skylark v6 3300 it is overheating no leaks no oil in the water or water in the oil no antifreeze in te exaust just changed the thermostat


Probably the water pump, when the engine is completely cool, open the radiator cap, start the engine, turn on the heat full, and check to see if you have circulation at the radiator cap nosal you should see movement of water if pump is good....

Feb 20, 2015 | 1992 Buick Skylark

1 Answer

Overheating?


Thermostat temperature senecer needs to be replaced

Nov 24, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have replaced the the Thermostat on my Chrysler 300 with the 5.7 Hemi Engine. It still over heats. Is there more than one thermostat on thi engine?


You didn't state when it overheats, if it is while driving the fault can be : belt driving water pump slipping , lower radiator hose collapsing, most common is clogged radiator. Start the engine with the radiator cap off when it is COLD and observe the flow in side. If you see really fast flow of coolant you have the bottom portion of the radiator stopped up. The only way to know is to remove the radiator and have it flow tested.
A blown head gasket or cracked head will cause steam to come out of the exhaust, water in the oil (milky). If it is running hot while idling , check fan to see if it is turning as it should when it should. Older cars have fan clutches that go bad, newer ones have temp thermostats that go bad.

Apr 30, 2017 | Chrysler 300 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to replace the water pump?


Hi Carlos: I suggest check this procedute for 4.3L, 5.0L, 5.7L and 7.4L Engines

NOTE:
Never open, service or drain the radiator or cooling system when hot; serious burns can occur from the steam and hot coolant. Also, when draining engine coolant, keep in mind that cats and dogs are attracted to ethylene glycol antifreeze and could drink any that is left in an uncovered container or in puddles on the ground. This will prove fatal in sufficient quantities. Always drain coolant into a sealable container. Coolant should be reused unless it is contaminated or is several years old.
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Drain the coolant from the radiator. Remove the upper fan shroud.
  3. Remove the drive belt(s).
  4. Remove the alternator and other accessories, if necessary.
  5. Remove the fan, fan clutch and pulley.
  6. Remove any accessory brackets that might interfere with water pump removal.
  7. Disconnect the lower radiator hose from the water pump inlet and the heater hose from the nipple on the pump. On the 7.4L engine, remove the bypass hose.
  8. Remove the bolts, then pull the water pump assembly away from the timing cover.
To install:
  1. Clean all old gasket material from the timing chain cover.
  2. Install the pump assembly with a new gasket. Tighten the bolts to 30 ft. lbs. (41 Nm).
  3. Connect the hose between the water pump inlet and the nipple on the pump. Connect the heater hose and the bypass hose (7.4L only).
  4. Install the fan, fan clutch and pulley.
  5. Install and adjust the alternator and other accessories, if necessary.
  6. Install the drive belt(s). Install the upper radiator shroud
  7. Fill the cooling system. Connect the battery.

11_2_2011_10_05_25_pm.gif

Fig. 7: Water pump installation - 5.0L and 5.7L engines

Hope this helps and just keep in mind that your feedback is important and I'll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

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Nov 02, 2011 | 1997 Chevrolet Suburban

1 Answer

How to replace a radiator on a1994 toyota land cruiser


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  1. Disconnect battery ground cable.
  2. Drain engine coolant.
  3. Remove battery and tray,
  4. Remove radiator grille
  5. Disconnect No. 3 water bypass hose.
  6. Disconnect radiator inlet hose.
  7. Disconnect coolant reservoir hose.
  8. Loosen water pump pulley mounting bolts.
  9. Loosen lock, pivot and adjusting bolts of alternator and remove drive belts.
  10. Disconnect oil cooler hose from clamp on fan shroud, then remove shroud.
  11. Remove water pump pulley mounting nuts.
  12. Remove fan with fluid coupling, water pump pulley and fan shroud.
  13. Disconnect transmission oil cooler hoses.
  14. Disconnect radiator outlet hose.
  15. Remove radiator brackets, then the radiator.
  16. Reverse procedure to install.

Dec 11, 2010 | 1994 Toyota Land Cruiser

2 Answers

My 1996 olds. aurora keeps over heating. I can just put coolant in the radiator and seconds after I start the engine, I get a low coolant reading in the information display. In addition, it spits...


Hello,

There are several problems that could be leading to an engine overheating. I will discuss some of them and you can try to act on which solutions that can help.

THERMOSTAT STUCK SHOT The thermostat, which is usually located in a housing where the upper radiator hose connects to the engine, controls the operating temperature of the engine. It does this by blocking the flow of coolant from the engine to the radiator until the engine reaches a certain temperature (usually 190 to 195 degrees F.). When this temperature is reached, the thermostat opens and allows coolant to circulate from the engine to the radiator.
If the thermostat fails to open, which can happen due to mechanical failure or if a steam pocket forms under the thermostat due to incomplete filling of the cooling system or coolant loss, no coolant will circulate between the engine and radiator, and the engine will quickly overheat.
You can check for this condition by carefully touching the upper radiator hose when the engine is first started and is warming up. If the upper radiator hose does not become hot to the touch within several minutes after starting the engine, it means the thermostat is probably defective and needs to be replaced.
CAUTION: The replacement thermostat should always have the same temperature rating as the original. Do not substitute a colder or hotter thermostat on any vehicle that has computerized engine controls as engine operating temperature affects the operation of the fuel, ignition and emissions control systems.


DEFECTIVE FAN CLUTCH
On rear wheel drive vehicles with belt-driven cooling fan, a "fan clutch" is often used to improve fuel economy. The clutch is a viscous-coupling filled with silicone oil. The clutch allows the fan to slip at high speed, which reduces the parasitic horsepower drag on the engine. If the clutch slips too much, however, the fan may not turn fast enough to keep the engine cool.
The silicone fluid inside the clutch breaks down over time and can leak out due to wear, too. If you see oily streaks radiating outward on the clutch (and/or the fan can be spun by hand with little or no resistance when the engine is off), it means the clutch is bad and needs to be replaced. Any play or wobble in the fan due to wear in the clutch also signals the need for a new clutch.


EXTERNAL COOLANT LEAKS

Leaks in radiator or heater hoses, the water pump, radiator, heater core or engine freeze plugs can allow coolant to escape. No engine can tolerate the loss of coolant for very long, so it usually overheats as soon as a leak develops.
A visual inspection of the cooling system and engine will usually reveal where the coolant is going.
Leaks in hoses can only be fixed by replacing the hose. Leaks in the water pump also require replacing the pump. But leaks in a radiator, heater hose or freeze plug may sometimes respond to a sealer added to the cooling system.


WEAK OR LEAKY RADIATOR CAP
If no leaks are apparent, the radiator cap should be pressure tested to make sure it is holding the specified pressure. If the spring inside the cap is weak (or the cap is the wrong one for the application), the engine will lose coolant out the overflow tube every time it gets hot.

INTERNAL COOLANT LEAK
If there are no visible coolant leaks, but the engine is using coolant, there may be a crack in the cylinder head or block, or a leaky head gasket that is allowing coolant to escape into the combustion chamber or crankcase.

EXHAUST RESTRICTION
In some instances a severe exhaust restriction can produce enough backpressure to cause an engine to overheat. The most likely cause of the blockage would be a plugged catalytic converter or a crushed or damaged pipe. Checking intake vacuum and/or exhaust backpressure can diagnose this kind of problem.

BAD WATER PUMP
In a high mileage engine, the impeller that pumps the coolant through the engine inside the water pump may be so badly corroded that the blades are loose or eaten away. If such is the case, the pump must be replaced. Most pump failures, however, occur at the pump shaft bearing and seal. After tens of thousands of miles of operation, the bearing and seal wear out. Coolant starts to leak out past the shaft seal, which may cause the engine to overheat due to the loss of coolant. A sealer additive will not stop this kind of leak. Replacing the water pump is the only cure.
CAUTION: A leaky water pump should be replaced without delay, not only to reduce the risk of engine overheating but to prevent catastrophic pump failure. If the shaft breaks on a rear-wheel drive vehicle, the fan may go forward and chew into the radiator ruining the radiator.


INOPERATIVE FAN MOTOR
On most front-wheel drive cars, the fan that cools the radiator is driven by an electric motor. A temperature switch or coolant sensor on the engine cycles the fan on and off as additional cooling is needed. If the temperature switch or coolant sensor (or the relay that routes power to the fan motor is bad), the fan won't come on when it is needed and the engine will overheat. Likewise, if the fan motor itself is bad, the fan won't work.
The system needs to be diagnosed to determine where the problem is so the correct component can be replaced.

Also check if you are not having a blockage in the coolants hose.

Take care and good luck

Oct 26, 2010 | 1996 Oldsmobile Aurora

2 Answers

Car runs well but after driving it awhile the fan does not come on. the temp gauge in the dash does not go up past halfway but steam comes from under the hood.the fan works and i replaced the temp sencer...


Typically when there is steam coming from the hood there is a pin hole in the radiator or hose. Most of the time when I see this problem there was a small chip in the radiator from a stone. It would allow steam to push out of the radiator but it was small enough to not allow any fluid to drip out. Hope this helps!

Jul 30, 2010 | 1991 Toyota Celica

1 Answer

I am getting a P1481 code, From what I see it could be the Fan Clutch, but would it also cause it to shift at a higher RPMs, It only does it some time.


OK, loss of cooling fan speed. I will say this is plausible. I'll take your word for it (sometimes my online resource is not complete).

prev.gif next.gif Cooling Fan & Shroud Removal & Installation To Remove:
  1. Drain the coolant from the engine.
  2. Remove the air cleaner assembly from the engine compartment.
  3. Remove the air resonator assembly from the engine.
  4. Remove the inlet radiator hose from the radiator.
  5. Detach the transmission oil cooler lines from the fan shroud.
  6. Disconnect the fan clutch connector. Fan clutch removal and installation gm-03-00-1477.gif

  7. Use a J 46406 fan clutch remover and installer to remove the fan clutch from the water pump.
  8. Remove the upper mounting bolts from the fan shroud.
  9. Remove the fan shroud from the radiator by lifting the shroud and pushing inward.
To Install:
  1. Attach shroud to the radiator. Torque the bolts to 21 ft-lb (28 Nm).
  2. Use a J 46406 fan clutch remover and installer to install the fan clutch onto the water pump.
  3. Connect the fan clutch connector.
  4. Attach the transmission oil cooler lines to the fan shroud.
  5. Install the inlet radiator hose to the radiator.
  6. Install the air resonator assembly onto the engine.
  7. Install the air cleaner assembly into the engine compartment.
  8. Refill the engine with coolant.
prev.gif next.gif

Jul 22, 2010 | 2003 Chevrolet TrailBlazer

6 Answers

My 04 dodge 1500 keeps over heating when i turn the ac on or when im going up hills "why"


under maximium load your cooling system is struggling asuming you have an automatic transmission,it is cooled through the radiator,when running the ac your condenser is hot,right in front of the radiator,if your not leaking,and your anti-freeze looks bright green an clean ,and the fan or fans are working ,first change the thermostat,cheapest,remove the serpintine belt and inspect the water pump pulley,spin it by hand,try to tip it forward and backward,to see if it wobbles,it should spin smooth and quiet,if it has a chattering or growling feel,or the pulley wobbles change the pump,the only thing left is the radiator ,make sure that debri or something isnt stuck in front of it a small piece of paper is enough to restrict airflow,inspect the core is it turning green and the fins are falling out ,is the plastic shroud intact around it, lots of things could be going on ,the transmission could be low on fluid,and running hot,causing the excessive load on the radiator,disregaurd this if you have a manual.need more info to pinpoint further,hope this helps

Jul 11, 2009 | 2004 Dodge Ram 1500

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