Question about 1995 Volvo 850

Open Question

I can't read oil on the dipstick on my 1995 volvo 850 even after changing oil. It seems to be leaking as there is only couple quarts left in pan when changing, but I never know how much oil is in the engine as the dipstick will not register.There are no apparant leaks such as oil on the pavement or engine

Posted by on

Ad

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya Mechanic can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repair professionals here in the US.
click here to Talk to a Mechanic (only for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad
  • 102 Answers

SOURCE: car leaking transmission oil

the only correct info is at volvo web site ,pay the 3 days and read the info,/or give us more info on pipe leaking,if its a turbo car pass side?is oil lines that leak/drivers side trans cooler lines? what type,color fluid?

Posted on Aug 26, 2008

Ad
glennsmart
  • 818 Answers

SOURCE: oil leak?

Whoa whoa ... You've said that the car takes 7 quarts of oil. That's 14 pints. Depending on which engine variant is fitted, engine oil capacity is either:

  • 5.75 litres + 0.4 litre if the oil cooler is drained
  • Turbo - 3.85 litres + 0.6 litre if the oil cooler is drained
  • These figures are for a UK 3 litre version of the 960
If you've filled the car with 7 quarts of engine oil that's almost twice as much oil as should be in the engine. Did you mean pints when you wrote quarts?

If you've filled it with 7 quarts it's overfull. Way too full. Check your oil dipstick - remove it, wipe it clean and then dip the oil level. At the bottom of the dipstick there is a flattened wider part. The oil level should not be below the bottom of this marker, and nor should it be above it. If the oil level is way above the flattened marker bar - you're overfull and will have to drain some oil out of the engine. An overfilled engine will try and blow oil out from wherever it can as the oil system will over-pressurised.

Ok .. so there's no problem with the engine compression. The crankcase isn't overfilled with oil (the crankcase is known as the oil sump in the UK). There's no oil fouling of the plugs and the car isn't burning oil, just leaking it. There's no misfires or running

If the engine isn't overfilled with oil there may be a problem with a broken/sticking piston ring or piston/cylinder. That high oil loss you mention seems severe. A problem with a piston/ring/cylinder can allow the compression to leak past the rings/piston into the engine oil sump and pressurise it. Under pressure, the oil will try and leak to atmosphere from anywhere it can.

A blue smoky exhaust is also an indication of piston/ring problems. A quick check is to start the car. If there's a cloud of blue smoke at start up which clears quickly, it's like to be worn valve guides. If, when driving the car with a warm engine there's blue smoke on acceleration - it points to a problem with rings/piston.

A quick check is to remove the spark plugs. Is there engine oil on one or more of them? An oiled up plug indicates that the engine oil is finding its way up past the rings/piston - and if oil can find its way up to a spark plug, then exhaust gasses/compressed fuel/air can find its way into the engine oil sump and pressurise it.

Another quick check is to start the engine and remove the oil dipstick. If fumes are 'chugging' out of the tube or oil is spitting out, that's another sure-fire sign that the oil sump is becoming pressurised due to a piston ring/piston/cylinder problem.

If you possess or can borrow an engine compression tester there is a further test you can do yourself to confirm whether or not there are piston/ring problems. Basically, a compression tester is just a gauge that screws into the cylinder head in place of the spark plug.

Warm the engine for 5 minutes so that the pistons expand fully in the bores.
Remove the spark plugs
Fit the compression tester into No1 cylinder and crank the engine for 10 seconds. Make a note of the compression reading on the gauge.
Do the same for each cylinder.

Here's an example of what you might find (the figures are for example only)
Cylinder Reading
1 115
2 120
3 118
4 95
5 96
6 117

Figures vary, but there should not be more than a 10% difference between the readings.
In the example above you can see that cylinders 4 and 5 have readings that are well below those of the other cylinders. This is indicating problems within those two cylinders. The lower compression could be due to a head/gasket fault or piston ring/piston problem. A split or worn exhaust valve in the head may cause low compression, a misfire and uneven running but it won't cause the engine oil sump/crankcase to pressurise. Now, some fine tuning to locate the exact problem:

Put a liberal squirt of oil into each cylinder - something like Redex, WD40 or engine oil.Put a cloth over each spark plug hole and spin the engine to get rid of the excess oil. The idea is that the oil you have squirted into the piston bores will form a 'seal' around the outside of the piston/rings.

Do the compression tests again and note the readings. If the readings go up significantly it indicates that the rings/pistons/bore has a problem. Readings that go up significantly are due to the oil forming a seal around the piston which raises the compression whilst testing. Here's an example:Cylinder Reading on 1st test 2nd test
1 115 118
2 120 121
3 118 120
4 95 110 Significant rise - more than 10%
5 96 98
6 117 119

Ok .. all this means is that cylinder 4 has compression problems due to the rings/piston/bore. The 2nd compression reading (with the oil squirted in) is higher simply because the oil formed a seal. Cylinder number 5 still has a low reading which didn't increase significantly on the 2nd 'wet' (when oil is added) test. This suggests that the problem is an exhaust valve/head gasket/head problem.

If there had been no significant increase in the reading on number 4 cylinder, this would suggest valve/gasket head problem. Low readings on adjoining cylinders (and which don't increase with the 2nd compression 'wet' oil test) would indicate a faulty head gasket between those two cylinders.

I'll continue this article ... ran out of word space

Posted on Sep 18, 2008

  • 4 Answers

SOURCE: 95 850 Coolanl leak

The turbo is cooled by engine coolant and possibly one of the cooling hoses have failed - it's pretty difficult to see back there so you'll need a mirror and a flashlight.

Posted on Oct 12, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Replacing broken front corner light panel on Volvo 850

When you open the hood, look directly behind the headlight. all the way in the corner and a little way down should be a hook. I usually use a screwdriver and pull directly outward and then a little to the right or left. Then bring the hook back and the corner light should be disconnected. Then you can pull it out and do what you need to do. When you put it back, its a pain because you have to get the hook into a plastic groove. Make sure that you know where the plastic piece is before you start, just get a flashlight and find it. Then use your screwdriver the pull the hook up and get it into the groove. Presto!

Posted on May 22, 2009

Gort007
  • 1187 Answers

SOURCE: JUST bought a 1995 volvo 850 and the engine light

darh,
Not likely...
Have the fault light analyzed at AutoZone, free. You will be given a number code and a print-out with a general description of possible problems.
Have it done and let us know, via a comment, what was found. We will guide you from there...
It could be as simple as a loose gas cap!

Posted on Oct 15, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

I did an oil change on my Volvo 850 turbo, added 4 quarts of oil and it does not show on dipstick


You need more oil. Add until it says it is full or in the full range. Also make sure you oil plug is tight on the oil pan.

Sep 25, 2015 | 1995 Volvo 850

1 Answer

I have 1995 volvo 850. it reads that its in W mode, i have the arrow flashing as well as the winter switch flashing. when this first started happening 2 days ago at every stop when i would accelerate it...


probly trans issue--automatics are very complex and w age of car cud be many things-u can du fluid change-but dont flush it-that gimmic kills trannys-----u cud add a cleaner like'seafoam'--ajustn linkage mite help as well a tv cable on the engine intake------but a bad torque converter--pump--solenoids or cloged valve body is a strong thot--hav an honest transmission specialist testdrive car--dont rush any decision-get othr opinions 1st---u can buy jaspar trans w 100,000 mi warranty-dont git that at no rebuild shop

Oct 30, 2013 | 1995 Volvo 850

1 Answer

I need to put gear oil in my 1996 volvo 850


There's no dipstick for the transmission for those model year. There is a check/fill plug on the left hand side of the transaxle casing. You need the remove the plug and the oil level should be up to the lower edge of the hole.
Source : Haynes manual
Note : The plug is quite big, 19mm socket or so, located close the the steering rack, a little more than halfway up the casing. If I remember correctly, it uses the same gasket as the oil pan plug. Make sure everything is clean all around before removing. There should be another one at the lowest spot for drainage. Make sure you get the right oil (see owners manual). Fill using a seringe or squirting throught a plastic tube.
Source : my 1994 850...

Feb 19, 2013 | 1996 Volvo 850

1 Answer

1996 volvo 850 pcv valve location


These have a PCV oil trap, not a valve. It is located under the intake manifold. The hoses run from under the spark plug wire cover all the way down to the oil trap and over to the throttle body. Over time the PCV oil trap becomes brittle and clogged. You will need to buy a new PCV kit for around $150 and replace it. Before you do, you must clean out the engine block where it attaches at its lowest point on the engine. I used sea foam, compressed air, and a coat hanger. I did an oil change at the same time so I could drain the sea foam out of the oil pan. Make sure you clean it out good because it will spray oil out of the dipstick and oil filler cap even after replacing the PCV components.

Apr 13, 2012 | 1995 Volvo 850

1 Answer

Got a 95 850 volvo and it started to leak red fluid from the transmision. what is the fix AJ


Try to locate where it leaks from ,might be from oil pan or drain plug or transmission or fly wheel seal.

Put a cardboard under the car to locate the exact spot. Good luck

Dec 24, 2010 | 1995 Volvo 850

2 Answers

Changing transmission fluid


Hello,

changing transmission fluid a messy job because there's no drain plug to change the fluid, but you can do it yourself if you're so inclined. To change the fluid, you have to get under your vehicle and remove the pan from the bottom of the transmission.
When you loosen the pan, fluid will start to dribble out in all directions so you need a fairly large catch pan. You should also know that removing the pan doesn't drain all of the old fluid out of the transmission. Approximately a third of the old fluid will still be in the torque converter. There's no drain plug on the converter so you're really only doing a partial fluid change. Even so, a partial fluid change is better than no fluid change at all.
A typical fluid change will require anywhere from 3 to 6 quarts of ATF depending on the application, a new filter and a pan gasket (or RTV sealer) for the transmission pan. The pan must be thoroughly cleaned prior to reinstallation. This includes wiping all fluid residue from the inside of the pan and scraping all traces of the old gasket from the pan's sealing surface. Don't forget to clean the mounting flange on the transmission, too.
When the new filter is installed, be sure it is mounted in the exact same position as the original and that any O-rings or other gaskets have been properly positioned prior to tightening the bolts. Then tighten the bolts to the manufacturer's recommended specs.
When refilling the transmission with fresh fluid, be careful not to allow any dirt or debris to enter the dipstick tube. Using a long-neck funnel with a built-in screen is recommended.
CAUTION: Do not overfill the transmission. Too much fluid can cause the fluid to foam, which in turn can lead to erratic shifting, oil starvation and transmission damage. Too much fluid may also force ATF to leak past the transmission seals.
Add half a quart at a time until the dipstick shows full. The transmission really isn't full yet because the dipstick should be checked when the fluid is hot, and the engine is idling with the gear selector in Park. So start the engine, drive the vehicle around the block, then recheck the fluid level while the engine is idling and add fluid as needed until the dipstick reads full.

Take care and good luck

Oct 26, 2010 | Toyota MR2 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have an 1995 Volvo 850 and believe there is engine oil leaking between the engine and transmission. What would be my best course of action


It sounds like the rear oil seal on the oil base pan is leaking......You have to remove the base pan and replace the front and rear oil seal.They just sit in the grouve of the oil pan.You can also try retorqueing the bolts first to see if they came loose over time. Hope this helps.

Aug 12, 2010 | 1995 Volvo 850

1 Answer

My volvo is leaking oil from engine


Check the oil-pan bolts.
Head-cover gasket, distributor.
Timing-chain cover areas.

Nov 26, 2009 | 1995 Volvo 850

1 Answer

Car leaking transmission oil


the only correct info is at volvo web site ,pay the 3 days and read the info,/or give us more info on pipe leaking,if its a turbo car pass side?is oil lines that leak/drivers side trans cooler lines? what type,color fluid?

Jun 21, 2008 | 1995 Volvo 850

Not finding what you are looking for?
1995 Volvo 850 Logo

Related Topics:

90 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Volvo Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

77202 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22265 Answers

Ronny Bennett Sr.
Ronny Bennett Sr.

Level 3 Expert

6927 Answers

Are you a Volvo Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...