Question about 1986 Ford F 250

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How do i get better brakes on my 86 f250 4x4. i have the best pads and shoes i can find but wonder if there is a total upgrade. i can not make it stop. my dad has a 85 and its the same way. thankyou for any info. brian

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You use custom parts like 
http://www.partsgeek.com/catalog/1986/ford/f150/brake/brake_rotor_set.html   and
http://www.partsgeek.com/catalog/1986/ford/f150/brake/brake_pad_set.html

Posted on Aug 01, 2010

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Check fluide,if full.ask how old is fuild,bleed the breaks,it my be in the lines

Posted on Aug 01, 2010

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1 Answer

How to change brake pads on a 2010 Nissan Frontier


double posted verbatim
all 4? and emergency brake parts./

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for a total of 12 pads/shoes.
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Jun 12, 2014 | 2010 Nissan Frontier

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Lack of braking since new. Have tried best combo's of rotors, front disk brake pads & best rear drum shoes !


Bleed the breaks untill you get clean clear fluid out of each one. start with the right rear, left rear, right front, left front. DO NOT let the reservor get low while bleeding. You can suck air into the lines and have the same problem. You need to do this immediatly as your brakeing ability is uncertain and can be un reliable.

Jan 31, 2013 | 1998 GMC Suburban

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Brakes


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Dec 25, 2011 | 1986 Ford F150 SuperCab

1 Answer

Cant get brakes to work


Hydraulic brakes are quite simple in their basic operation, but can sometimes be difficult to troubleshoot.
Basically, a piston presses on a hydraulic fluid, which presses other pistons against the brake shoes.
Total failure is rare, but usually indicates where you should be looking to find the problem.
Typical points of failure are:
  • Brake shoes/pads. Shoes are used on drum brakes, pads on disk brakes. While they aren't typically the cause of total failure, they can be a problem.
  • Low brake fluid. Sometimes worn brake pads can result in significant piston movement inside the caliper. That can cause low brake fluid inside the reservoir. Check the fluid level.
  • Leaky master cylinder or slave cylinder. Usually you'll see fluid leaking around the inside of the wheels or down from the master cylinder.
  • Air in the brake line. If there is a poor seal on the master cylinder or if the brake fluid has been allowed to run out, it's possible that you may air in the line. The hydraulic line must be purged of all air for hydraulic brakes to function properly. If you haven't done it before, enlist the help of a mechanically inclined friend who has a little experience with bleeding the brakes.
Of course, it's always possible that a flexible brake line has ruptured or been cut or some other damage has occurred, but that's rare.

Mar 06, 2011 | 1997 Ford F250 SuperCab

1 Answer

Something is rubbing against brakes grinding noise


Getting a rock caught between a brake surface and the pad or shoe is common, but a grinding noise because the brake surface is meeting a worn away pad or shoe is even more common. Have a garage look at it, if the brake material is gone you need new brakes, if it is just a rock they can pluck it out for you. Bad brakes do not get better on their own.

Aug 06, 2010 | 1997 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

How do u get the old brake pads off the back of a dodge durango 2004


NOT THIS IS FOR 4WD 5.7L
Brake Relining
  • Brake linings that are worn to within 1/32 inch (0.79 mm) of a rivet head or that have been contaminated with brake fluid, grease, or oil must be replaced.
f45-27.gif Potential brake shoe problems. Courtesy of Wagner Brake Products.
  • Failure to replace worn linings results in a scored drum. When it is necessary to replace brake shoes, they must also be replaced on the wheel on the opposite side of the vehicle. Inspect brake shoes for distortion, cracks, or looseness. If these conditions exist, the shoe must be discarded.
  • Do not let brake fluid, oil, or grease touch the brake lining.
  • If a brake lining kit is used to replace the linings, follow the instructions in the kit and install all the parts provided.
  • The two general methods of attaching the linings to the brake shoes are bonding and riveting.
  • The bonded linings are fastened with a special adhesive to the shoe, clamped in place, then cured in an oven. Instead of using an adhesive, some linings are riveted to the shoe.
  • Riveted linings allow for better heat transfer than bonded linings.
Drum Shoe and Brake Installation
  • Before installing the shoes, be sure to sand or stone the inner edge of the shoe to dress down any slight lining or metal nicks and burrs that could interfere with the sliding upon the support pads.
  • A support (backing) plate must be tight on its mount and not bent. Stone the shoe support pads brightly and dress down any burrs or grooves that could cause the shoes to bind or hang up.
  • Using an approved lubricant, lightly coat the support pads and the threads of servo star wheel adjusters. On rear axle parking brakes, lubricate any point of potential binding in the linkage and the cable. Do not lubricate nonservo brake adjusters other than to free a frozen adjuster with penetrating oil.
fr_45.30.3184.gif The areas or pads where the brake show will rub or contact the backing plate.
  • Reassemble the brakes in the reverse order of disassembly. Make sure all parts are in their proper locations and that both brake shoes are properly positioned in either end of the adjuster.
  • Also, both brake shoes should correctly engage the wheel cylinder pushrods and parking brake links.
  • They should be centered on the backing plate. Parking brake links and levers should be in place on the rear brakes.
  • With all of the parts in place, replace the brake drum.

May 22, 2010 | 2004 Dodge Durango

1 Answer

Changing the brake pads


  • Brake linings that are worn to within 1/32 inch (0.79 mm) of a rivet head or that have been contaminated with brake fluid, grease, or oil must be replaced.
f45-27.gif Potential brake shoe problems. Courtesy of Wagner Brake Products.
  • Failure to replace worn linings results in a scored drum. When it is necessary to replace brake shoes, they must also be replaced on the wheel on the opposite side of the vehicle. Inspect brake shoes for distortion, cracks, or looseness. If these conditions exist, the shoe must be discarded.
  • Do not let brake fluid, oil, or grease touch the brake lining.
  • If a brake lining kit is used to replace the linings, follow the instructions in the kit and install all the parts provided.
  • The two general methods of attaching the linings to the brake shoes are bonding and riveting.
  • The bonded linings are fastened with a special adhesive to the shoe, clamped in place, then cured in an oven. Instead of using an adhesive, some linings are riveted to the shoe.
  • Riveted linings allow for better heat transfer than bonded linings.
Drum Shoe and Brake Installation
  • Before installing the shoes, be sure to sand or stone the inner edge of the shoe to dress down any slight lining or metal nicks and burrs that could interfere with the sliding upon the support pads.
  • A support (backing) plate must be tight on its mount and not bent. Stone the shoe support pads brightly and dress down any burrs or grooves that could cause the shoes to bind or hang up.
  • Using an approved lubricant, lightly coat the support pads and the threads of servo star wheel adjusters. On rear axle parking brakes, lubricate any point of potential binding in the linkage and the cable. Do not lubricate nonservo brake adjusters other than to free a frozen adjuster with penetrating oil.
fr_45.30.3184.gif The areas or pads where the brake show will rub or contact the backing plate.
  • Reassemble the brakes in the reverse order of disassembly. Make sure all parts are in their proper locations and that both brake shoes are properly positioned in either end of the adjuster.
  • Also, both brake shoes should correctly engage the wheel cylinder pushrods and parking brake links.
  • They should be centered on the backing plate. Parking brake links and levers should be in place on the rear brakes.
  • With all of the parts in place, replace the brake drum.

Apr 15, 2010 | 1986 Ford Econoline

1 Answer

Brakes squealing very loud on 300c chrysler 2008. Dealer says nothing they can do. I also have 2 friends who own the same model and theres squeal as well. WHY??and how to fix problem


You need to install a better quality brake shoes/pads. I have a van that did the same thing and after installing better shoes all was fine. If you have a shop do the work you mustspecify that you need high quality pads and or shoes installed. Many shops will install the cheapest ones..

Mar 22, 2009 | 2007 Chrysler 300c AWD Sedan New Cars

1 Answer

Gettin ready to throw new pads on my 86 f250.


If it is a 1986 F250 it has rear drum brakes. Being a 3/4 ton the rear end could be a floater and that makes replacing the shoes a little more difficult.

Mar 14, 2009 | 1986 Ford F 250

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