Question about 2000 Audi A6

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Why do I have to pump the brakes a couple of times before running? I notice that one pump is not sufficient to keep it from rolling.

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Leaking brake lines ? defective brake component which is leaking fluid , bad master cylinder or you have contaminants in the lines (air )

Posted on Jul 31, 2010

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I changed the front brake calipers on my 2000 cougar now the peddle goes to the floor what is wrong with it


There is air in the calipers and they need to be bled. Have an assistant pump the brake pedal a couple of times then hold it down. Loosen the bleed screw on the caliper, then tighten and have them pump the pedal again. Repeat until all the air is out of the system. Keep an eye on the brake fluid reservoir so it doesn't run out, or you will end up having to bleed the whole system.

Sep 11, 2011 | 2000 Mercury Cougar

2 Answers

I have a 93 Plymouth Voyager. About a week ago both the brake and ABS lights came on and I had almost no brakes. Made it home, and found broken springs in rear passenger brake. Fixed them, also bled the...


The question is: do you still hear the buzz of the brake pump? If your brake pump has stopped get a hammer and metal rod about 2 feet long. Open the front hood of the car and turn the ignition on but do not start the car. Locate the brake reservoir (with fill caps) and follow the two large hoses down to the metal pump directly underneath bolted to the top of the transmission. Place the metal rod against the side of the pump and rap it several times with the hammer. If the pump is stuck it should start running again after a couple of taps. With the pedal is now soft and the ABS is now working the lights should go out after a couple of stops. You should be alright to drive until the pump gets stuck again , usually from 2 to 6 months. If the pump will not start up go to the salvage yard and purchase a used one. A new one if still available it will run about $900. If you have made the right repairs the lights will go out on there own.

Aug 23, 2011 | 1993 Plymouth Voyager

2 Answers

I changed the front brake pads and now have no pressure when i press the brake peddal. the master cylinder is full but still no pressure. what did i do wrong?


You may not have done anything wrong. You won't have any pressure the first couple of times that you press the brake pedal. Try pumping the brakes a few times. When you change the pads you have to open the caliper all the way up to get the caliper back on. When you press the brake the pads won't go all the way to the caliper on the first couple of times you press the brake. But once you pump the pedal, it should build up pressure. If not you will have to bleed the brakes.

Nov 29, 2010 | 1995 Toyota 4Runner

1 Answer

My passport wouldn't brake, then there was a bump and now it won't move in gear at all. Ideas?


It is possible that you have a caliper locked up. When in gear, do you notice any attempt at movement? A locked up caliper ( or wheel cylinder if you have drum brakes in the rear) will keep the car from moving but it will TRY to move - you will notice a raising of the front of the car if your brakes are locked up. It would be best to have it towed to a shop unless you have mechanical skill sufficient to change the brakes yourself. You will probably need to replace the rotors as well as the brake pads and calipers. The caliper pushes the pads into the rotor which causes friction sufficient to stop the car.
Hope this helps!!

Nov 05, 2010 | 1997 Honda Passport

2 Answers

What are the steps to flushing the brake system? or site?


There is a drain plug on the brakes. You have to remove the drain plug and pump the brakes until clean fluid comes out, each wheel at a time. I would let a brake place do it. They have the tool to put clean fluid in and you don't need anyone to pump the brakes.

Sep 03, 2010 | 2004 Pontiac Grand Prix

1 Answer

I'm a mid-age woman w/a 94 DeVille that I want to change the brake fluid myself. How do I do that? Thank you!


BRAKE SYSTEM BLEEDING Diagonal Split System MASTER CYLINDER
  1. Refill the master cylinder reservoir.
  2. Push the plunger several times to force fluid into the piston.
  3. Continue pumping the plunger until the fluid is free of the air bubbles.
  4. Plug the outlet ports and install the master cylinder.
COMPLETE SYSTEM
  1. Fill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid. Check the level often during the procedure.
  2. Starting with the right rear wheel, remove the protective cap from the bleeder, if equipped, and place where it will not be lost. Clean the bleed screw. When bleeding the brakes, keep face away from the brake area. Spewing fluid may cause facial and/or visual damage. Do not allow brake fluid to spill on the vehicle's finish; it will remove the paint.
  3. If the system is empty, the most efficient way to get fluid down to the wheel is to loosen the bleeder about 1?2 - 3?4 turn, place a finger firmly over the bleeder and have a helper pump the brakes slowly until fluid comes out the bleeder. Once fluid is at the bleeder, close it before the pedal is released inside the vehicle. NOTE: If the pedal is pumped rapidly, the fluid will churn and create small air bubbles, which are difficult to remove from the system. These air bubbles will eventually congregate resulting in a spongy pedal.
  4. Once fluid has been pumped to the caliper or wheel cylinder, open the bleed screw again, have the helper press the brake pedal to the floor, lock the bleeder and have the helper slowly release the pedal. Wait 15 seconds and repeat the procedure (including the 15 second wait) until no more air comes out of the bleeder upon application of the brake pedal. Remember to close the bleeder before the pedal is released inside the vehicle each time the bleeder is opened. If not, air will be induced into the system.
  5. If a helper is not available, connect a small hose to the bleeder, place the end in a container of brake fluid and proceed to pump the pedal from inside the vehicle until no more air comes out the bleeder. The hose will prevent air from entering the system.
  6. Repeat the procedure on remaining wheel cylinders in order:
    1. Step 1: Left front
    2. Step 2: Left rear
    3. Step 3: Right front
  7. Hydraulic brake systems must be totally flushed if the fluid becomes contaminated with water, dirt or other corrosive chemicals. To flush, bleed the entire system until all fluid has been replaced with the correct type of new fluid.
  8. Install the bleeder cap(s) on the bleeder to keep dirt out. Always road test the vehicle after brake work of any kind is done.
Teves® Anti-lock Brake System FRONT BRAKES
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF throughout this procedure.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Remove the reservoir cap. Check and/or refill the master cylinder reservoir.
  4. Using the bleeder adapter tool, install it onto the fluid reservoir.
  5. Attach a diaphragm type pressure bleeder to the adapter and charge the bleeder to 20 psi.
  6. Using a transparent vinyl tube, connect it to either front wheel caliper and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  7. Open the bleeder valve 1?2 - 3?4 turn and purge the caliper until bubble free fluid flows from the hose.
  8. Tighten the bleeder screw and remove the bleeder equipment.
  9. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the pump to charge the accumulator.
  10. After bleeding, inspect the pedal for sponginess and the brake warning light for unbalanced pressure; if either of the conditions exist, repeat the bleeding procedure.
REAR BRAKES
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Check and/or refill the master cylinder reservoir.
  4. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the system to charge. NOTE: The pump will turn OFF when the system is charged.
  5. Using a transparent vinyl tube, connect it to a rear wheel bleeder valve and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  6. Open the bleeder valve 1?2 - 3?4 turn and slightly depress the brake pedal for at least 10 seconds or until air is removed from the brake system. Close the bleeder valve. NOTE: It is a good idea to check the fluid level several times during the bleeding operation. Remember, depressurize the system before checking the reservoir fluid.
  7. Repeat the bleeding procedure for the other rear wheel.
  8. After bleeding, inspect the pedal for sponginess and the brake warning light for unbalanced pressure; if either of the conditions exist, repeat the bleeding procedure.
Bosch® III Anti-lock Brake System
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Check and/or refill the reservoir to the full mark.
  4. Using a transparent vinyl hose, connect it to a pump bleeder screw and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  5. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  6. Move the transparent vinyl hose to the hydraulic unit bleeder screw. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  7. Disconnect the bleeder hose.
  8. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the hydraulic unit to charge; the pump should turn OFF after 30 seconds.
Bosch® 2U Anti-lock Brake System
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Check and/or refill the reservoir to the full mark.
  4. Using a transparent vinyl hose, connect it to a pump bleeder screw and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  5. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  6. Move the transparent vinyl hose to the hydraulic unit bleeder screw. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  7. Disconnect the bleeder hose.
  8. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the hydraulic unit to charge; the pump should turn OFF after 30 seconds.
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Sep 02, 2010 | 1994 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

Truck runs fine,then dies when hot,the problem does not happen all the time,replaced fuel pump same problem,noticed fuel pump runs all the time now


wrong fuel pump? wires crossed, fuel pump should run when car is on, this is what keeps it running, maybe fuel pump is louder than original and you notice it more. Check your fuel filter. Get a tune up........

Feb 15, 2010 | 1991 Toyota 4Runner

2 Answers

Have an '88 corolla sedan (manual), after brakes used in quick succession, brake pedal looses all assistance and pedal goes hard, resulting in poor brakes...any ideas


this is probably normal. your power brake booster operates by storing engine vacuum to be used later to assist the brakes. when you pump the pedal repeatedly in a short period, the stored vacuum gets used up and it does not have sufficient time to build up the vacuum needed to effectively assist with braking. it generally takes a few seconds to build up sufficient vacuum from when you let off the brake pedal to when you press it again. however, brake boosters can fail over time (it's not uncommon, but it does happen), so if this is a new development for this vehicle, you may need to replace the brake booster or check the vacuum line and the check-valve between it and the engine

Sep 29, 2009 | 1987 Toyota Corolla 2 Door

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