Question about Chrysler Concorde

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How can i know if the #1 piston is in the compression stroke,if the timing chain is off and ican`t get any pressure in the cly. on a 2.7 engine.

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The piston will just have to be fully all the way up,the compression stroke is only if the chain is on,cause it depends on the position of the valves,for that,you will have to install the chain,to have the valves move,there is a procedure to install the timing chain,if the marks on the timing gears are aligned to specs,then the cam will be in time with the crankshaft,then there is no worry on the compression stroke.If this was at all helpful,please rate,thank you.

Posted on Jul 29, 2010

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Firing order for rocam1.6


A six cylinder in-line engine has a power impulse every 720 degrees/6 i.e. 120 degrees of crankshaft rotation. The crankshaft has six crank-throws placed at 120 degrees out of phase with one another, which can be arranged only in three planes. Therefore, the crankpin phasing is arranged in pairs. For heavy-duty diesel engines, seven journals and bearings are provided, at each end and between adjacent crankpins. For petrol engines only 4 or 5 main journals are provided. The firing order with the crankshaft arrangement shown in the attached figure is considered. With piston 1 at the top of the compression stroke, its opposite piston 6 is at the top of its exhaust stroke. Rotation of crankshaft through 120 degrees brings pistons 2 and 5 to their TDC and either one of these can be arrangement to complete a compression stroke. If piston 5 is arranged to be at the end of compression and at the start of its power stroke, then piston 2 must be on its exhaust stroke. Rotation of crankshaft through second 120 degrees positions pistons 3 and 4 at the TDC, so either one of these can be on the compression stroke. If piston 3 is made to be on compression, piston 4 must be on its exhaust stroke. A third rotation of 120 degrees brings pistons 1 and 6 back again to TDC, where piston 6 is arranged to be on the compression and piston 1, therefore, be on its exhaust stroke. A fourth 120 degrees rotation brings pistons 2 and 5 to their TDC. Piston 2 is now on its compression and piston 5 on its exhaust stroke. Rotation of crankshaft through fifth 120 degrees brings piston 3 and 4 to TDC. Piston 4 is on compression and piston 3 on its exhaust stroke. Final rotation of 120 degrees completes the 720 degrees displacement of crankshaft and brings the pistons into positions for the next cycle. This cycle provides a firing order of 1, 5, 3, 6, 2, 4. If the phasing of paired crank-throws 3 and 4 and 2 and 5 are interchanged, then a second equally suitable firing-order of 1, 4, 2, 6, 3, 5 is achieved. This arrangement provides excellent dynamic balance and evenness of torque, and is preferred for engines larger than 2.5 liters provided length is not a prime consideration.

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1 Answer

I replaced my whole distributer in my 1992 2.8 liter v-6 s-10 but my son washed off the alignment marks, so I was wanderind how i can time it? please help!!!


If you know the engine's number one cylinder location, you need to put it at TDC of the compression stroke, then you lower the distributor in so that the rotor ends up pointing to the #1 spark plug wire tower on the distributor cap. As you drop it down, the gear on the dist. shaft will mesh with another gear and turn slightly. You want it ending up pointing directly to #1. Get it seated, then you can start the engine and set the timing according to specs with a timing light.

To find TDC of the compression stroke (as opposed to TDC of the exhaust stroke), pull the #1 spark plug out. Put a socket and wrench on the crankshaft pulley and turn it in its normal direction (clockwise), with your finger over the spark plug hole. As the number one piston is rising on its compression stroke, you can feel the pressure build up under your finger. You won't feel any pressure as the piston rises on the exhaust stroke, only on the compression stroke. So when you feel pressure, you know the piston is rising on its compression stroke, and you can turn the crank on around until the piston is at top of its travel-the notch on the crank pulley will now line up with the zero degrees mark on the pointer scale beside the pulley. There, TDC of compression stroke. Now drop in the distributor so the rotor tip lines up with the #1 spark plug tower on the dist. cap.

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1 Answer

How to reset timing on 1992 454 tbi after replacing distributer


You have to put the number 1 cylinder at Top Dead Center of the compression stroke, and then you install the distributor with the rotor pointing to the #1 spark plug wire tower that is on the distributor cap.

Pull the spark plug from number 1 cylinder. You need a helper to turn the engine over by hand (using a socket on the crank pulley), or he can bump the starter over in very short bursts. Put your finger over the spark plug hole. When the piston is rising on the compression stroke, you will feel air pressure on your finger. Now look at the crank pulley and turn the engine on over until the zero degrees mark lines up on the timing pointer. Or you can stick a long straw or similar into the spark plug hole (don't let it drop into the cylinder!) to feel when the piston is at top of travel...see, you feel for pressure build up with finger (piston is rising on compression stroke), when you feel it, turn engine on over by hand until the piston is at top of travel-that is TDC of compression stroke. Now install distributor so that rotor ends up pointing directly to number 1 spark plug wire tower. Then follow firing order -as the rotor turns, it will follow the firing order around the dist. cap.
There are two top dead centers of each piston, tdc of compression stroke and tdc of exhaust stroke- to time the engine, you need tdc of compression-that is when the spark plug fires in the cylinder, so that is when you want the distributor in with the rotor pointing to #1.

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1 Answer

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The procedure is ti fit the timing belt properly. Did you start the process with the engine at TopDeadCenter on the compression stroke of number 1 cylinder? Something is terribly wrong, congratulations on testing the configuration by hand. I've seen what damage has been done by people that just hooked up the battery and wind it over. They had a smashing good time.

Pull all your spark plugs, put your finger over the number 1 spark plug hole and wind the engine over by until you find the compression stroke on number 1 cylinder. Keep turning slowly until you bring you crank timing mark to the timing indicator. You should be at TDC compression number 1 cylinder, you can check with a screw driver or piece of wire that the piston is at the top. Make sure you are winding the engine in its working direction. Now look at your camshaft timing marks and indicators, they should all line up. If the marks are out of line, correct them, do not move the crank.

Once you have everything lined up again and tensioned correctly. Turn over the engine by hand 2 FULL revolutions. Should be all good then.

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1 Answer

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With the head off, the bottom end doesn't know compression from exhaust from squat. The crank just keeps pushing the pistons up and down. You set the #1 cylinder at the top of travel, the mark on the pointer scale must be at zero, then when you have the head on with the camshaft sprocket on its mark, and the timing belt or chain on, you should be at TDC on the compression stroke. To verify, both valves on #1 should be closed-the camshaft lobes for #1 should be more or less pointing up-away from the valves.
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1 Answer

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1 Answer

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1 Answer

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3 Answers

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