Question about 2000 Oldsmobile Intrigue

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Cooling fans not working. They do not come on with the AC either. If I manually trigger the relay one of them starts (I think in high speed)

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  • tjanzer Jul 10, 2010

    need further clarification on location of temp switch for cooling fans. Engine is 3.5L

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  • Master
  • 749 Answers

The coolant temp sensor may be malfunctioning. You may be able to unplug the coolant temp sensor and the fans should come on.If its the 3.1 or 3.4 it is located on the lower intake by the upper radiator hose. That sensor regulates when the fans should come on.If possible you may be able to use a scan tool to read what the ecm thinks the engine temperature is. If the sensor is reading to low it will not send correct information to the ecm to turn the fans on. The second fan should only come on when the ac is on.

Posted on Jul 10, 2010

  • tjanzer Jul 10, 2010

    The engine is a 3.5L. I also think it may be the switch but still cannot find it. Another thing that may be helpful is that the AC does not blow cold air. I have charged the system, which was low but it is still not blowing cold air. The cooling fans are more important at this time.

  • Jonathan S
    Jonathan S Jul 10, 2010

    On the 3.5L it is located right rear of engine below the throttle body additionally this may be affecting the ac as well.

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  • Master
  • 6,784 Answers

HI. I have a very thorough, step by step procedure that will help troubleshoot this issue. Follow carefully to isolate the problem. Use extreme caution when preforming this inspection procedure.



1.Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.


2.Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.


3.Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.


4.Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.


5.Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.


6.Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.


7.Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.


NOTE_ Your temp sensor will be located on the drivers side towards the back and down low. Look back toward the wind shield, on the back side of the engine block and down low. You will see the 2 wire plug connector protruding outward.

Posted on Jul 10, 2010

  • Michael Masters
    Michael Masters Jul 10, 2010

    Here is a pic of the temp sensor.




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alldata.com
question one, is what engine.
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