Question about Ford Escape

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So Emissionwiz: Follow up question - We took the car to an A/C service guy to recharge the system and he says it is fully charged. No need for a recharge. The A/C blows cold at idle and normal around town driving. Is it possible that the PCM is shutting off the compressor too early? Right now, the A/C shuts off when pulling a trailer on the slightest grade. I guess I have two questions: 1. What sensor does the PCM use to decide the engine is at 60% of full throttle? 2. Can I adjust or override this sensor to have the compressor keep running even when the sensor thinks I?m at 60% power? I?ve got to pull a trailer from Texas to California which means driving through a lot of high heat areas. Having the A/C trip off for the slightest grade is going to make for a miserable drive. Solution #2 posted on Jul 08, 2010 Report Abuse emissionwiz emissionwiz Rank: Guru Motors Expert Rating: 90.50% , 11741 votes the AC compressor in this car is disengaged at about 60% of full throttle to give u more power, it is also possible u have less than a full charge of refridgerant, the outlet temp of the should be at about 32 F after the system has been run for 5 minutes or so. if u had a vacuum issue the air flow would switch to the defrost vents, that is called the safety default, so if the air continues to come out the dash registers then u have no vacuum problem. pulling a steep hill and a boat will almost certainly cause the compressor to kick off as the load exceeds 60% of full throttle, this is all controlled by the cars central computer, thios computer is vcalled the power train control module or PCM for short. My experience? 35 years as a Ford dealer tech with a masters in electoonic engine controls and climate control from Ford and ASE

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If you're going this way - why not just go old school and for this trip run a hot wire straight to the battery for total control? I know this is not kosher but for this one trip it seems to be the quick - simple and true answer. When you get home - dump the truck because it sounds like someone set the system up wrong. How this works is - the truck is sent to the dealer many times without everything installed that you ordered. The dealers get paid for installing these things - like tow packages -- if you got a bad one or just a slight variance it can be a problem for the life of the vehicle.

Best of it
Gary @ Fix Ya

Posted on Jul 08, 2010

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I need to know where the recharge port is to recharge A/C on a 1999 Ford Expedition


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I drove it home and it was fine, i shut it off and within five mins i tried to start it and it would crank but wouldnt turn over, i tried a few more times and it nothing, but now my battery is going low...


Hello,

The first and most likely indication of a low battery would be a hard starting problem caused by slow cranking. If the battery seems weak or fails to crank your engine normally, it may be low. To find out, you need to check the battery's "state of charge."
A battery is nothing more than a chemical storage device for holding electrons until they're needed to crank the engine or run the lights or other electrical accessories on your vehicle. Checking the battery's state of charge will tell you how much juice the battery has available for such purposes.
If your battery is low, it needs to be recharged, not only to restore full power, but also to prevent possible damage to the battery. Ordinary automotive lead-acid storage batteries must be kept at or near full charge to keep the cell plates from becoming "sulfated" (a condition that occurs if the battery is run down and left in a discharged condition for more than a few days). As sulfate builds up, it reduces the battery's ability to hold a charge and supply voltage. Eventually the battery becomes useless and must be replaced.

The charge level depends on the concentration of acid inside the battery. The stronger the concentration of acid in the water, the higher the specific gravity of the solution, and the higher the state of charge.
On batteries with removable caps, state of charge can be checked with a "hydrometer." Some hydrometers have a calibrated float to measure the specific gravity of the acid solution while others simply have a number of colored balls. On the kind with a calibrated float, a hydrometer reading of 1.265 (corrected for temperature) indicates a fully charged battery, 1.230 indicates a 75% charge, 1.200 indicates a 50% charge, 1.170 indicates a 25% charge, and 1.140 or less indicates a discharged battery. On the kind that use floating balls, the number of balls that float tells you the approximate level of charge. All balls floating would indicate a fully charged battery, no balls floating would indicate a dead or fully discharged battery.
Some sealed-top batteries have a built-in hydrometer to indicate charge. The charge indicator only reads one cell, but usually shows the average charge for all battery cells. A green dot means the battery is 75% or more charged and is okay for use or further testing. No dot (a dark indicator) means the battery is low and should be recharged before it is returned to service or tested further. A clear or yellow indicator means the level of electrolyte inside has dropped too low, and the battery should be replaced.

On sealed-top batteries that do not have a built-in charge indicator, the state of charge can be determined by checking the battery's base or open circuit voltage with a digital voltmeter or multimeter. This is done by touching the meter leads to the positive and negative battery terminals while the ignition key is off.
A reading of 12.66 volts indicates a fully charged battery; 12.45 volts is 75% charged, 12.24 volts is 50% charged, and 12.06 volts is 25% charged.

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Your charging system should be capable of recharging the battery if it is not fully discharged. Thirty minutes or so of normal driving should be enough.
If your battery is completely dead or extremely low, it should be recharged with a fast or slow charger. This will reduce the risk of overtaxing and damaging your vehicle's charging system. One or both battery cables should be disconnected from the battery prior to charging it with a charger. This will eliminate any risk of damage to your vehicle's electrical system or its onboard electronics.

Take care and good luck

NB: Your alternator might not also be charging the battery while the car is on, so try to check the alternator.

Alternators are pretty rugged, but can succumb to excessive heat and overwork. They can also be damaged by sudden voltage overloads (as when someone attempts to jump start a dead battery and crosses up the jumper connections or if someone disconnects a battery cable from the battery while the engine is running).
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Most service facilities have test equipment that can identify these kind of problems. So if you suspect a weak alternator, you should have it tested to see if it needs replacing.
Most service facilities do not repair or rebuild alternators because it's too time consuming and requires special parts. Most will replace your old unit with a new or remanufactured unit. Your old alternator is usually traded in or exchanged for a credit (so it can be remanufactured and sold to someone else).

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