Question about 1989 Toyota Celica Liftback

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I'm having a problem with my 1989 Toyota Celica ST with a 2 liter 3SFE engine. The engine seems to miss or stumble during acceleration or if the engine is under a load such as going up a hill. I have replaced the plugs, wires, and distributer cap. The car has approx 235,000 miles. The stumble seems to be more noticable when I first start up, but I notice it after the engine has warmed up also.

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: My 1993 Toyota Celica GT hesitates upon Acceleration

did they change the fuel filter??? if so then i would check to see if you have a miss in one of your cylinders this can be chacked as easy as turning your car on and going around the the muffler and listening to see if it makes a funny noise something like a low cough nothing loud just a little cough. if you cant hear anything like that take it in to a mechanic and have then check the pressure in each one of your cylinders
if it is not either one of those that i am not sure either hope it helps

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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  • 2002 Answers

SOURCE: I have a 1989 Toyota Corolla, 5 speed manual;

I would look at the fuel delivery system. Change the fuel filter if it hasn't been done lately. Also get the fuel pressure checked. I don't have the specs but it could be that your fuel pump is getting worn and occasionally has trouble pumping enough fuel to the carb. It's also possible that your carb may need to be overhauled. They do wear and get build up in the pasages over time. Also check to see if your warm air valve in the air cleaner is working. It is possible that your carb is icing up in the cold weather and it is more likely to happen at highway speed.
If you need to get the carb overhauled take it to a shop that specializes in this type of work. You will be glad you did when you get it back.
Hope this helps.

Posted on Mar 02, 2010

muntejaya
  • 10421 Answers

SOURCE: 1995 Celica St 1.8L. Engine runs approx 10-15

Please check your coil for its spark. Observe the overheating on your coil when the car dies. If it has stranger heat and has poor spark, replace your coil with new one. Check also spark plugs and the wires together with distributor.
Regards, Jay

Posted on Feb 01, 2011

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I m looking for torque settings for Toyota 3s fe main bearings,bigend bearing and cylinderhead bolts


A-series: 1.5L, 1.6L and 1.8L, belt-driven overhead cam motors used in Corollas, later Celicas, early Tercels, Chevy Novas (NUMMI-built), and Geo Prizms;
E-series: 1.4L and 1.5L overhead cam, belt-driven engines used in '88 and up Tercels and Paseos;
F-series: 3.9L, 4.0L, 4.2L, pushrod straight six engines used in Landcruisers;
R-series: 1.8L/2.4L, overhead cam, chain-driven engines used in rear wheel drive only Coronas, older Celicas and pickups;
M-series: 2.2L through 3.0L overhead cam straight six engines used in Cressidas and Supras;
S-series: 2.0L and 2.2L belt-driven OHC engines used in Camrys, Celicas and MR2s;
VZ-series: 2.5L, 3.0L and 3.4L V6 engines used in Camrys, pickups, Lexus ES and T100s;
UZ-series: 4.0L V8 engines used in the Lexus LS400 and SC400.
Toyota manufactures motors from the very small up to large industrial diesels, so this is only a partial listing of the more common engine families. However, hopefully this information will bring some sense of order to the confusing alphabet soup of Toyota engine classifications.
The 2.0LLet's take a look at the 2.0L used in the late '80s Camry & Celica. The code for this engine is 3SFE. The S-series engines are a mid-sized, transverse mounted four-cylinder used in Camrys, Celicas, some MR2s, and other Toyota vehicles. The first letter (after the initial numeral) is an "S" and means that this engine belongs to the "S" group of motors. The "3" signifies the third change in bore/stroke to the S-group of motors.
So, what about other motors? A 3SGE used in the Celica GTS ('86-'89) is the same as the 3SFE in bore and stroke, uses the same block, is also fuel injected, but the cylinder head is a true dual overhead cam with both cams being externally driven. There was also a 3SGTE used in Celica turbos, and MR2 turbos. This is basically the same motor as the 3SGE with the exception of the "T" which stands for turbocharged.
In the S-family of motors that were available in the U.S., there was also a 2SE used in the early Camrys. They had a different bore and stroke and single overhead cam design (no "F" or "G"). Current Camrys are using a 5SFE - externally identical to the 3SFE - except that the bore and stroke have been upped to 2.2L from 2.0L, and a pair of balance shafts were added to the lower end. Toyota's other engine families follow the same pattern. Now for a little more detail on "S" family differences.
The 2SEThe 2SE belongs to the "S"-series engine family. The 2 signifies the second revision of that group of motors. (So where is the 1S-motor? I'm assuming either it was not available in the U.S. or maybe was just a prototype that never entered production). The "E" stands for fuel injected.
The 2SE was first used in the U.S. with the introduction of the front wheel drive Camry. This was a single overhead cam 2.0L motor with bucket tappets with "hockey puck" adjusting discs. Bore and stroke were 84mm (3.307") x 90 mm (3.540"). In 1986 the Celica moved to a front wheel drive platform and it also used the 2SE motor in '86 in the ST and GT models.
The 3SFEFor 1987, the Camry and Celica base motor was changed to a square bore 86mm x 86mm and a "twin cam" head. It was still 2.0L, but the designation was now 3SFE. The 3 obviously meant the 3rd revision of the "S"-series engine family, and the "E" we know to mean EFI.
The "F" code that Toyota uses stands for twin cam or dual overhead cam, however, only one of the cams is externally driven. (Don't confuse this "F" with Toyota's F-series family straight six engine used in Landcrusiers). The 3SFE was used in Camrys from 1987-'91, and in Celicas from '87-'89.
Toyota has actually brought this motor back and it is used in the new mini-sport utility RAV4. I haven't seen any of the motors from the RAV4, so I'm really not sure what differences there are.
For now let's focus on the '87-'91 Camry/Celica version. There are some 4WD Camrys out there, Toyota called them All-Trac, and there should be some differences in the block and head. However, those vehicles should be few and far between. So other than the 4WD cars and the RAV4, the 3SFE application will pretty much fit all years.
There are a few things you should watch out for. These include the following:
•The number of flywheel bolts in the crankshaft. In 1987 there were six, and in '88 and up there were eight. There may be, however, some overlap within those two years;
•The cranks and flywheels are interchangeable. You can either have the customer visually verify the number of flywheel bolts, or you can just furnish the appropriate flywheel (automatic or manual) and not worry about the number of bolts;
•Stiffening ribs were added to the block in '89. The ribs may interfere with the larger older style oil filter. Make sure the new smaller oil filter is used if you use a newer block in an older vehicle.
The 3SGEThe Celica GTS from '86-'89 used a 3SGE motor. Still an "S"-series, it has the same bore and stroke as the 3SFE. The big difference is in the head, hence the "G" instead of the "F". The "G" is a true DOHC with both cams being externally driven, and the valves splayed outwards at a wider angle giving more of a pent-roof design to the combustion chamber. In the lower end, 3SGEs used a steel crankshaft and bushed rods along with different pistons.
The 3SGTEThere is also a 3SGTE used in the All-Trac turbo Celica ('88-'93) and MR2 turbo ('91-'95). The "T" stands for, you guessed it, turbocharged. There are some differences in the block, head, and some of the internal parts that are specific to the turbo motor.
The 5SFEThe 5SFE is a 2.2L with a bigger bore and stroke (87mm x 91mm). This motor was introduced in the Celica and MR2 in 1990 and the Camry in 1992. It was still being used in the Camry in 1997. The 5SFE added a pair of balance shafts in the oil pan driven off of the crankshaft in 1992.
That's a very quick tour of Toyota's "S" series engines. Remember the first number is the revision number of that group. The second digit (letter) is the engine family/grouping. The third digit, if an F or a G, stands for which type of OHC design.
Here's a quick rundown on what parts you can and can't interchange on the 2S and 3S engines:
CRANKSHAFTS•The 2SEs are all six-bolt. The 3SFEs are cast and may be either 6- or 8-bolt.
•The 3SGEs are steel and eight-bolt.
•The 3SGTE: I'm not sure if the turbo motor used the same crank as the non-turbo 3SGE. I think it did, but I'm not 100% sure because I haven't seen any turbo motors.
CONNECTING RODS•The 2SE and 3SFE both use the same press fit rod.
•The 3SGE and 3SGTE both use the same bushed rod.
BLOCKS•The 2SE is a block by itself. It has a unique 84 mm bore.
•The 3SFE and 3SGE blocks may be interchanged, however, be aware of the differences in the later strengthened blocks with additional ribbing.
•The 3SGTE. It would be a good idea to custom build the turbo blocks unless you know specifically more about the differences of the
VZ-FE 2.0L (78mm X 69.5mm): This 2.0L engine was used in the Japanese home market Camry/Vista models and was not available in the United States.
2VZ-FE 2.5L (87.5mm X 69.5mm): This engine was available for Camry 1988-'91 and the Lexus ES250 1990-'91. The 2VZ-FE is a 2.5L version of the "VZ" family. This motor has Toyota's twin cam per head set up, hence the "FE" designation.
North America saw this motor introduced on the FWD 1988 Toyota Camry and 1988 Lexus ES250 (which was really a dressed up Camry). Featuring four valves per cylinder; it put out 156 hp @ 5600 rpm and 160 ft.lbs. of torque @ 4400 rpm.
The design of the motor is basic Toyota from the 1980s, with cast iron block, a one-piece main bearing cradle, aluminum heads and a timing belt driving the intake camshafts, which operate bucket lifters with adjusting discs. The buckets and discs are the same ones used in Toyota's 16-valve A-, S- and M-series.
four camshafts

Sep 30, 2016 | Toyota Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Where is the throttle position sensor on my 2000 Toyota celica gt? What would be signs that the TPS is bad on my car?


It is on the throttle shaft,2 little bolts . Should have turned on the check engine light if it's bad ,would stumble and possibly die on acceleration,best to get it scanned at a parts house to see if it has a TPS code or not

Oct 01, 2013 | 2000 Toyota Celica

1 Answer

When the headlights are on and i step on the brakes in my 1989 toyota celica the right brakelight goes out and the left one gets brighter


there is a bad gound in the system just give the right side brake light a separate ground at the socket

Feb 15, 2012 | Toyota Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I can not find the fuel filter on my 1983 celica


its on passenger side, under hood, rear side of strut tower, mounted on fuel line thats if your motor is a 2.4 liter/ 2-brl 4 cyl.

Jan 04, 2011 | 1983 Toyota Celica Supra

2 Answers

Head bolt torque specs?


I really really really hope you turned the bolts an additional 90 degrees after torquing to 22 Ft-lbs. Otherwise, you may be taking that head off again.

Best of luck,

David

Feb 09, 2010 | 1994 Toyota Celica

1 Answer

Toyota celica 1990 5sfe auto


The 5sfe is notorious for distributor problems. You'll get correct resistance readings on the primary and secondary coils, but your spark looks weak. Should see a bright blue spark with an audible POP when sparking. On some 5sfe engines, the coils are located in an all-in-one pacakage inside the distributor. You'll know if you have this one if the only large spark plug type wires connected to the distributor cap count 4 and go to the 4 cylinders. There will not be a center wire coming from a coil. This is the distributor that has issues. I am on my third one now. Same symptoms every time. I know exactly what to change when it happens, and it fixes it every time. Luckily, It's only about $95 if you do your searching well enough. Good luck

Mar 28, 2009 | 1989 Toyota Celica Liftback

1 Answer

My toyota celica 1989 ST has some engine problems, when i start it in the morning the acceleration seems so low and the engine shakes and when i try to move it, the engine stops so i have to start it...


i think you might have problems with your idle speed control valve. and cold start valve. have a mechanic clean it first before replacing to save money

Mar 25, 2009 | 1989 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

My 1993 Toyota Celica GT hesitates upon Acceleration


did they change the fuel filter??? if so then i would check to see if you have a miss in one of your cylinders this can be chacked as easy as turning your car on and going around the the muffler and listening to see if it makes a funny noise something like a low cough nothing loud just a little cough. if you cant hear anything like that take it in to a mechanic and have then check the pressure in each one of your cylinders
if it is not either one of those that i am not sure either hope it helps

Jan 17, 2009 | 1993 Toyota Celica

2 Answers

AFM 22250-65010


can you tell me what this is in regards to what on the vehicle?

Sep 01, 2008 | 1989 Toyota 4Runner

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