Question about 1999 GMC Safari

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Besides a blown head gasket what else can cause water in the oil?

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  • Master
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Cracked Heads, Cracked Block, missing chain guide for the timing belt lets it wear a hole in the cover which lets water mix in the oil. You are looking at tearing that engine down to find the problem.

Posted on Jul 07, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 148 Answers

SOURCE: 1983 Ranger

you have to pull it aprt again even though you changed the head gasket,did you plane your heads first,you might have an uneaven surface,but once you pull the heads off,try to check the cylinders with a bright light,check around the top of the cylinders it usally cracks there,a hairlane crack is all it takes,your probally going to have to pull the motor,and bring it to a machine shop,they can plane the block,and heads,and they can check it for cracks,if you have a cracked block they can put a sleeve in the cylinder thats cracked,but if I was you I would grab a junkyard motor and throw it in,I dont know what condition your truck is in but spending all that money on a 83 I would just grab junkyard motor

Posted on Jul 13, 2008

ewashmidas
  • 362 Answers

SOURCE: Gasket is blown, water in my oil.

As long as the heads are not damaged from overheating repairing would be an option rather than replacing the engine. Get advise from a mechanic you trust. The intake manifold gaskets are the most common problem with this vehicle if you have the V6 engine.

Posted on Jan 30, 2009

  • 407 Answers

SOURCE: possible blown head gasket

yes you do

Posted on Apr 25, 2009

localwonder
  • 6784 Answers

SOURCE: oil looks milky,and losing coolant,is there

HI. If your car is equipped with an engine oil cooler that uses coolant to operate, this would be a good place to start (This is a big issue in some GM vehicles). Sometimes an engine oil cooler can act like a one way valve. When the engine is not running but is still hot the cooling system will have about 15 pounds of residual pressure forcing coolant into the engine. This problem can be repaired by replacing the engine oil cooler. Once the oil cooler has been replaced you must replace the engine oil and filter and recheck for the conditions once more. There are three remaining causes for coolant in the motor oil, and they all require you to dismantle the engine. This can be tricky because the repair overlaps and it is difficult to tell which one is causing the problem. For example: A mechanic has told you that the cylinder head is cracked, or warped, and as they start disassembling, they have discover it was the intake manifold gasket that has failed. It's up to the honesty of the repair shop to tell the customer that the cost of the repair will be less. Or the opposite can happen, example: A repair shop has told your engine has a blown head gasket, once the disassembling is complete, they inform you the head gasket is ok, and the cylinder has been pressure checked and is ok. This only leaves the engine block as the failure and must be replaced to repair the problem, and that can be very costly. Always check the intake gasket first on V6, V8 and V10 engines. Then the cylinder head gaskets, cylinder heads and finally the engine block.

Posted on Dec 10, 2009

  • 978 Answers

SOURCE: is there any other problems I need to check

more than likely head gasket just check for cracks in cylinder head as you have it stripped

Posted on Aug 23, 2010

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3 Answers

My 1997 mx6 2.5l g2 has a blown head gasket (milky oil and loss of water.) I need to find whats causing the overheating. do you have any ideas as to whats causing this. thanks


you may have answered your own question .a blown head gasket will cause water to get in the oil therefore loss of water will cause it to overheat.driving under these conditions will cause more engine problems.

Dec 03, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

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Engine froze up, what causes water to get in oil?


The head gasket could be blown. Is there a lot of water? Is there oil in your radiator?
There is a chance, it could be condensation. If it is just a small amount of milky looking oil on the oil cap.

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Pajero overheating


It sounds like you had a blown head gasket and it was leaking into the oil or into the exhaust and being burned. if you look at the oil on the dip stick it may look milky. if the head gasket starts leaking internally then it can / will cause overheating

Dec 02, 2013 | Mitsubishi Outlander Sport Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Bad head gasket?


The A/c will drip water normally from the condensation drain hose, a small hose on the front of the firewall somewhere.

Are you having to continually put in radiator water? Has your engine oil got an appearance like dirty milk (water in it)? If not, and it is not overheating very quickly (a classic sign of a blown head gasket) then you can discount the head gasket as a cause.

Continual need for oil can also be due to a leak (oil on the outside of the engine and heavy drips on the ground), or burning of oil (much blue smoke from the tailpipe after idling for a bit).

You could get a compression test, which will point to a blown head gasket and/or a worn engine which is burning oil. A radiator leak down test will show up a leaky coolant system.

May 27, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

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Hi i have 98 camry it blow white smoke not only on 1st start, but only sometimes.driving up hill and it is rattling and blow white smoke and the car have not enough power.pls any help suuggestion is very...


Sounds to me like the head gasket is blown, but there may be sealant in the system which is making it intermittently leak antifreeze into the cylinders.

A bad cylinder head gasket will also cause a compromise in compression, which will cause a lack of power.

Time to overhaul or replace the engine's head gasket, or replace the engine with one that doesn't have a blown head gasket.

Good luck on this repair.

Dec 30, 2010 | 1998 Toyota Camry

2 Answers

Hi.my a4's overheating and seemingly no oil pressure.


well you may have put the gasket back on wrong blocking the oil hole which supplies the oil to the head, this would cause the low oil pressure and the oil light coming on.
If the gasket is on the wrong way it may be causing the overheating problem as well by blocking or partially blocking the water holes in the head that allow the water to get to the head and cool it down.
these are the only things I can think of apart from maybe a cracked block caused by the overheating but that would not explain the lack of oil to the rockers
Hope this helps

Jun 14, 2010 | 2002 Audi A4

1 Answer

28 Solutions for ''HOw can I tell if I have a cracked head blown head gasket or cracked blown like how can I see it''


Often (but not always), a blown head gasket will also cause deposit of water on a piece of cardboard held an inch from the tailpipe output while the engine is running (when this is happening, it is likely that the catalytic converter has been ruined and the muffler will corrode in short order as well).

Sometimes drops of water will be seen dropping from the end of the tailpipe. Another clue: turn on the heater; often when the head gasket is blown an odor of antifreeze and synthetic rubber will emanate from the heater vents.
Many of the symptoms of blown head gasket can be caused by some other problem in the cooling system, without the head gasket being damaged. Conversely, other problems with the cooling system can cause a blown head gasket and/or warped head.

When checking for a blown head gasket, one of the most common tell-tale signs is a milky-gray ring around your oil cap. When coolant enters the engine oil through a crack in the head or through a blown gasket, it evaporates and leaves a milky ring around the oil cap. Another easy way to tell is to check your oil dipstick. Change your oil and pull out the dipstick. Make sure that you take note of how far up the dipstick the oil is. Top off your cooling system and fill your cooling reservoir to the top. Screw radiator cap back on and start engine. Run engine for about 20-30 mins. or until it reaches normal operating temperature. Allow engine to cool (engine must cool completely to get accurate oil reading!!). Check oil dipstick again. If the oil has a watery appearance and has risen noticeably up the dipstick, the you probably have a blown head gasket or a warped head. Also look for a dripping, sweet-smelling liquid coming out of your tailpipe. Any of the above symptoms could be the result of a blown head gasket. The easiest way to tell is with a compression meter. This replaces the spark plug and lets you know what compression each cylinder is running at. If your compression is abnormally low, then you have a blown head gasket or a warped head. (note: consult repair manual for appropriate compression of each cylinder.)

Dec 12, 2009 | 2005 Dodge Grand Caravan

6 Answers

Audi a4 mixing water and oil together hissing,grey/brown foam


That is not true oil and water being mixed can come from many different places. Such as a bad radiator which would cause transmission oil to mix with the water also alot of audi's have a water cooled oil cooler which are a very common cause of oil being mixed with with water. These type of oil coolers are located under you oil filter. They have water lines hooked to them which cools the oil and when they go bad the water and oil will mix. So dont be convinced that its your head gaskets it could be but not as likely. You can pressure test your oil cooler to see if this is the problem just romove it an plug one off the inlet or with rubber plug which can be purchased at you local hardware store (I found mine at ace hardware in there specialty drawers where they have all there bolts) then attach a air hose to the other outlet pressureize the system and place it in a bucket of water. this should tell you if the oil cooler is bad but be careful not to ove3r pressureize the cooler this could damage it and caust it to leak. 15 to 30 psi should be plenty.

Mar 30, 2009 | 1999 Audi A4

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