Question about 1991 Plymouth Grand Voyager

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Engine cranks but will not start. Spark plugs changed, HEI distributorless ignition unit tested good.where do I go from here?

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  • twinklehunte Jul 13, 2010

    The starting fluid suggestion and listening to the injectors suggestion were enormously helpful!

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Spray some starting fluid into the intake, and see if it shows signs of life. If it does, then you have a fuel delivery problem.

Now, a 1991... That's fuel injected, yes? Throttle body injection or port injection?

Posted on Jul 07, 2010

Testimonial: "Although the plugs did in fact fire and this suggestion did not find the problem, this advice was quite useful in finding out what it wasn't. We've got it tracked down to fuel delivery and now have to find a way to empty and drop the fuel tank to check the fuel pump..."

  • twinklehunte Jul 07, 2010

    Yes, multi-port injected

  • BrianWren Jul 07, 2010

    While cranking, you should be able to hear the injectors clicking by putting your ear down nearby, or by putting the tip of a screw driver on an injector, and pressing the handle into your ear canal—if the injectors are operating. They actually tick pretty prominently.

    If starting fluid gives you no action, you have to suspect the ignition, despite the tests run so far revealing nothing.

    Take out a plug, reattach it to the plug wire, lay the plug on the engine, crank the engine and verify that the plug fires with all the tested parts integrated into the engine. Sometimes parts that test well don't perform right while installed in their happy home. Verification is necessary to rule the tested parts out as the problem.

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Check the camshaft positioning sensor, or the crankshaft positioning sensor as well, im going through this exact same problem, it might help

Posted on Oct 11, 2011

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1 Answer

Why my 94 Astro van will not fire


this generation of gm vehicles is easy to troubleshoot. the engine needs 3 things to run: compression, fuel, and spark. since you mention fire, i assume you have no spark.

disconnect any random spark plug wire and connect the end to a hei spark tester. crank engine and observe for spark. if you have no spark, disconnect the center terminal of the distributor cap and use the hei tester in the same manner. spark means cap and rotor bad or bad plug wireset. no spark means make more checks.

check for battery voltage and good ground on distributor. check for open or shorted ignition module or ignition coil windings. if power and ground is present and ignition coil tests ok, check for ignition pulses at coil primary. if you have no ignition pulses feeding the coil, change the distributor.

with that generation of vehicle, the ignition system will operate without help from the computer. don't even troubleshoot the guts of the distributor, if you change the cap, rotor, and anything else, it will be the same price as a remanufactured distributor, and might not fix the problem. if you troubleshoot a low volrage related issue (no pulses, shorted or open circuit, unstable timing, etc), change the whole thing.

Jul 29, 2016 | 1994 Chevrolet Astro

2 Answers

Engine cranks, but no start


First let me say thanks for the effort for our country.
Do you know if the injectors are getting voltage and pulse ground, and if the plugs are getting spark ?
You need to know that to proceed.

Dec 12, 2012 | 1996 Buick Roadmaster

1 Answer

No spark to ignition


First, check the HEI distributor for extreme wear, and have the HEI module tested. Then, if you can do it, you need to check the crank sensor, and then the Engine Control Module.

Dec 23, 2011 | 1991 Buick Park Avenue

1 Answer

How to check ignition coil for proper operation


  1. Connect an ohmmeter between the TACH and BAT terminals in the distributor cap. The primary coil resistance should be 0 or nearly 0 ohms . If not replace the coil.
  2. To check the coil secondary resistance, connect an ohmmeter between the rotor button and the BAT terminal. Note the reading. Connect the ohmmeter between the rotor button and the TACH terminal. Note the reading. The resistance in both cases should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms. Be sure to test between the rotor button and both the BAT and TACH terminals.
  3. Replace the coil only if the readings in Step 1 and Step 2 are infinite resistance or out of specification.
jturcotte_2418.gif





All tests included below.

The symptoms of a defective component within the HEI system are exactly the same as those you would encounter in a conventional system. Some of these symptoms are:


Hard or No Starting Rough Idle Poor Fuel Economy Engine misses under load or while accelerating.
If you suspect a problem in your ignition system, there are certain preliminary checks which you should carry out before you begin to check the electronic portions of the system. First, it is extremely important to make sure the vehicle battery is in a good state of charge. A defective or poorly charged battery will cause the various components of the ignition system to read incorrectly when they are being tested. Second, make sure all wiring connections are clean and tight, not only at the battery, but also at the distributor cap, ignition coil, and at the electronic control module.
Instruments designed specifically for testing HEI systems are available from several tool manufacturers. Some of these will even test the module itself. However, the tests given in this section will require only an ohmmeter and a voltmeter.

CAUTION The HEI ignition system can generate voltage of 30,000-50,000 volts. When testing the system, DO NOT hold a spark plug wire while the engine is running or cranking. Personal injury and or damage to the ignition system may result if this caution is not followed.
Since the only change between electronic and conventional ignition systems is in the distributor component area, it is imperative to check the secondary ignition circuit first. If the secondary circuit checks out properly, then the engine condition is probably not the fault of the ignition system.
If the engine won't start, perform this test. This will narrow the problem area down considerably.
  1. Remove one of the plug wires and insert a HEI spark tester tool in the plug socket.
  2. Ground the spark tester to the block and crank the engine. DO NOT touch the spark plug wire while the engine is cranking.
  3. The spark should be crisp and bright blue in color. If a normal spark occurs, try each spark plug wire until a no spark condition or a weak orange color spark is found. If all sparks are good, the problem is probably not in the ignition system. Check for fuel system problems, or fouled spark plugs.

If no spark occurs, check for the presence of normal battery voltage at the battery (BAT) terminal in the distributor cap. The ignition switch must be in the ON position for this test. Either a voltmeter or a test light may be used for this test. Connect the test light wire to ground and the probe end to the BAT terminal at the distributor. If the light comes on, you have voltage to the distributor. If the light fails to come on, this indicates an open circuit in the ignition primary wiring leading to the distributor. In this case, you will have to check wiring continuity back to the ignition switch using a test light. If there is battery voltage at the BAT terminal, but no spark at the plugs, then the problem lies within the distributor assembly. Go on to the distributor components test section.


If the engine runs, but runs roughly or cuts out, make sure the plug wires are in good shape first. There should be no obvious cracks or breaks. You can check the plug wires with an ohmmeter, but do not pierce the wires with a probe.
If the plug wires are OK, remove the cap assembly and check for moisture, cracks, chips, carbon tracks, or any other high voltage leaks or failures. Replace the cap if any defects are found. Make sure the timer wheel rotates when the engine is cranked. If everything is all right so far, go on to the distributor components test section.
DISTRIBUTOR COMPONENTS TESTINGSee Figures 2 and 3
If the trouble has been narrowed down to the units within the distributor, the following tests can help pinpoint the defective component. An ohmmeter with both high and low ranges should be used. These tests are made with the cap assembly removed and the battery wire disconnected. If a tachometer is connected to the TACH terminal, disconnect it before making these tests.
  1. Connect an ohmmeter between the TACH and BAT terminals in the distributor cap. The primary coil resistance should be 0&omega or nearly 0&omega . If not replace the coil.
  2. To check the coil secondary resistance, connect an ohmmeter between the rotor button and the BAT terminal. Note the reading. Connect the ohmmeter between the rotor button and the TACH terminal. Note the reading. The resistance in both cases should be between 6,000 and 30,000&omega. Be sure to test between the rotor button and both the BAT and TACH terminals.
  3. Replace the coil only if the readings in Step 1 and Step 2 are infinite resistance or out of specification.

jturcotte_2419.gif

Fig. Fig. 2: Checking coil resistance. Ohmmeter 1 shows primary test. Ohmmeter 2 shows secondary test.
These resistance checks will not disclose shorted coil windings. This condition can only be detected with scope analysis or a suitably designed coil tester. If these instruments are unavailable, replace the coil with a known good coil as a final coil test.

  1. To test the pick-up coil, first disconnect the white and green module leads. Set the ohmmeter on the high scale and connect it between a ground and either the white or green lead. Any resistance measurement less than infinite requires replacement of the pick-up coil.
  2. Pick-up coil continuity is tested by connecting the ohmmeter (on low range) between the white and green leads. Normal resistance is between 650 and 850&omega, or 500 and 1,500&omega on 1977 and later models. Move the vacuum advance arm while performing this test (early models). This will detect any break in coil continuity. Such a condition can cause intermittent misfiring. Replace the pick-up coil if the reading is outside the specified limits.
  3. If no defects have been found at this time, and you still have a problem, then the module will have to be checked. If you do not have access to a module tester, the only possible alternative is a substitution test. If the module fails the substitution test, replace it.

jturcotte_2420.gif

Fig. Fig. 3: Pick-up coil testing

Oct 24, 2011 | 1989 Buick Park Avenue

1 Answer

I have a 1998 1500 chevrlet pickup that cranks and will not start but when releasing the key from the crank mode sounds like the engine fires off for a moment


Sounds like it could be the ignition module. How you check for this problem depends on what type of system that you have. Does the engine have a distributor? If it does, then disconnect the coil wire if it has one and install a spark tester which is available at most part stores. If it does not have a coil wire then find the tach terminal located on the distributor and connect a test light between that terminal and ground. The spark tester should spark while cranking and the test light should blink while cranking. If they don't, then replace the ignition module. The spark tester can also be used on one of the spark plug wires for distributorless ignition systems.

May 22, 2011 | Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My grand prix shakes when i go up a hill or start out. i have good tires


If the shaking is caused by the engine missing (a misfire on 1 or more cylinders), then
check your (a) spark plug wires - pull each and check for continuity/faults/burn marks/etc., (b) spark plugs - pull each & check for fouling/faulty/etc.
Another good check for spark plug wires is to park in a dark area at night (open garage with the
lights out works), run the engine and observe the engine operate in the dark - little lights caused by
faint arcing means that the wires are leaking electricity to the engine block, instead of delivering it
to the spark plugs, like they should.
Your particular car has a Distributorless Ignition System (DIS), consisting of an ICM (Ignition Control
Module) connected to an individual coil pack for each pair of cylinders. You'll need a
HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition system tester (about $30-$45 any auto parts store) to test
these coil packs, which I have found quite easy to replace (usually a couple of 10mm cap screws).
Since the car shakes only when accelerating or going uphill, I tend not to think that suspension
components of the car are at fault.

Mar 16, 2011 | 2000 Pontiac Grand Prix

1 Answer

Car cranks but wont start


ENGINE CRANKS BUT WILL NOT START
When the engine cranks normally but won't start, you need to check ignition, fuel and"http://www.aa1car.com/library/compression.htm". Ignition is easy enough to check with a spark tester or by positioning a plug wire near a good ground. No spark? The most likely causes would be a failed ignition module, distributor pickup or "http://www.aa1car.com/library/crank_sensors.htm".
A tool such as an Ignition System Simulator can speed the diagnosis by quickly telling you if the ignition module and coil are capable of producing a spark with a simulated timing input signal. If the simulated signal generates a spark, the problem is a bad distributor pickup or crankshaft position sensor. No spark would point to a bad module or coil. Measuring ignition coil primary and secondary resistance can rule out that component as the culprit.
Module problems as well as pickup problems are often caused by loose, broken or corroded wiring terminals and connectors. Older HEI ignition modules are notorious for this. If you are working on a distributorless ignition system with a Hall effect crankshaft position sensor, check the sensor's reference voltage (VRef) and ground. The sensor must have 5 volts or it will remain permanently off and not generate a crank signal (which should set a fault code). Measure VRef between the sensor power supply wire and ground (use the engine block for a ground, not the sensor ground circuit wire). Don't see 5 volts? Then check the sensor wiring harness for loose or corroded connectors. A poor ground connection will have the same effect on the sensor operation as a bad VRef supply. Measure the voltage drop between the sensor ground wire and the engine block. More than a 0.1 voltage drop indicates a bad ground connection. Check the sensor mounting and wiring harness.
If a Hall effect crank sensor has power and ground, the next thing to check would be its output. With nothing in the sensor window, the sensor should be "on" and read 5 volts (VRef). Measure the sensor D.C. output voltage between the sensor signal output wire and ground (use the engine block again, not the ground wire). When the engine is cranked, the sensor output should drop to zero every time the shutter blade, notch, magnetic button or gear tooth passes through the sensor. No change in voltage would indicate a bad sensor that needs to be replaced.
If the primary side of the ignition system seems to be producing a trigger signal for the coil but the voltage is not reaching the plugs, a visual inspection of the coil tower, distributor cap, rotor and plug wires should be made to identify any defects that might be preventing the spark from reaching its intended destination.----
thanks for using fixya,please do rate the solution positively.

Feb 17, 2010 | 1996 Acura RL

3 Answers

My 1986 Chevy S-10 Blazer stopped running while i driving


If your engine timing is good, (meaning the cam is timed to the crank, and distributor) and you have spark and fuel, your engine will run. Try a compression test, and back up and re-test fuel and spark. Make sure the spark works with a HEI spark tester. (Coils can go bad and give a weak spark)

Oct 01, 2009 | 1984 Chevrolet S-10

1 Answer

I need the diagram to put the spark plug cables


2003 Chevrolet Malibu 3.1L SFI OHV 6cyl
Spark Plug Wires - Removal & Installation

3.5L Engine
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions Section.
    NOTE Twist the spark plug boot one-half turn in order to release the boot. Pull on the spark plug boot only. Do not pull on the spark plug wire or the wire could be damaged.
  2. Remove the intake manifold cover, if required.
  3. Disconnect the left side spark plug wires from the spark plugs.
  4. Disconnect the left side spark plug wires from the ignition coil.
  5. Remove the spark plug wire clips from the Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor bracket and the heater inlet and outlet pipe tab.
  6. Remove the spark plug wire assembly.
  7. If replacing only one plug wire, open the retaining clips and remove the appropriate spark plug wire.
  8. Disconnect the right side spark plug wires from the spark plugs.
  9. Disconnect the right side spark plugs from the ignition coils.
  10. Remove the spark plug wire assembly.
  11. If replacing only one plug wire, open the retaining clip and remove the appropriate spark plug wire.
To install:
  1. Install the spark plug wire assembly.
  2. Connect the right side spark plugs to the ignition coils.
  3. Connect the right side spark plug wires to the spark plugs.
  4. If replacing only one plug wire, open the retaining clip and install the appropriate spark plug wire.
  5. Install the spark plug wire assembly.
  6. Connect the left side spark plug wires to the spark plugs.
  7. Connect the left side spark plug wires to the ignition coil.
  8. Install the spark plug wire clips to the MAP sensor bracket and the heater inlet and outlet pipe tab.
  9. If replacing only one plug wire, open the retaining clips and install the appropriate spark plug wire.
  10. Install the intake manifold cover, if required.

Fig. 2.2L Engine Firing Order: 1-3-4-2 Distributorless ignition system
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Fig. 3.1L Engine Firing order: 1-2-3-4-5-6 Distributorless ignition system
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Fig. 3.5L Engine Firing order: 1-2-3-4-5-6 Distributorless ignition system
9313fa7.jpg


Fig. 2.4L Engine Firing order: 1-3-4-2 Distributorless ignition system
2c9af72.jpg


Fig. 3.1L Engine Firing order: 1-2-3-4-5-6 Distributorless ignition system
d929c16.jpg


Fig. 2.2L Engine Firing Order: 1-3-4-2 Distributorless ignition system
f357cd3.jpg

Fig. 3.5L & 3.9L Engines Firing order: 1-2-3-4-5-6 Distributorless ignition system
09e9db9.jpg

I really hope help you with this (remember rated this help) Good luck.

Sep 23, 2009 | 2003 Chevrolet Malibu

1 Answer

Ignition firing order and cable position at the coils


The 3.5L (VIN H) engine's unique ignition system has the ignition coils directly over each plug. No spark plug wires are used.

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3.5L (VIN H) engine Firing order: 1-2-3-4-5-6 Distributorless Ignition System



The firing order for the 3.1L VIN M, 3.4L VIN E, 3.4L VIN X and 3.5L VIN H engines is 1-2-3-4-5-6. The right bank cylinders are on the cowl side (rear) of the engine compartment and are numbered 1,3,5, left bank cylinders on the front side of the vehicle, are numbered 2,4,6.


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3.1L (VIN M) engine Firing order: 1-2-3-4-5-6 Distributorless Ignition System



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3.4L (VIN X) engine Firing order: 1-2-3-4-5-6 Distributorless Ignition System



81eff27.jpg

3.4L (VIN E) engine Firing order: 1-2-3-4-5-6 Distributorless Ignition System




The firing order for the 3.8L VIN K and 3.8L VIN 1 engines is 1-6-5-4-3-2. Starting at the front of the engine, cylinders in the left bank are numbered 1,3,5 and cylinders in the right bank are numbered 2,4,6.



50dbf18.jpg


3.8L (VIN 1) engine Firing order: 1-6-5-4-3-2 Distributorless Ignition System






6f4033f.jpg


3.8L (VIN K) engine Firing order: 1-6-5-4-3-2 Distributorless Ignition System


I hope help you with this, remember rated this help. Good luck.

Sep 01, 2009 | 1999 Chevrolet Lumina

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