Question about 1994 Audi 100

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Play in steering left hand inner ball joint on

Audi 100 1994 play in steering left hand inner ball joint on steering rack

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Posted on Jul 06, 2010

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I replaced my tierod on the passenger front.there is still some play in the left to right there is also a humming sound at speeds 40+mph. it's coming from the hub bearing or ball joint.


Any wear or play in a bush or rod usually gives a 'knock' or causes vibration, not a humming noise.
If there's play in the steering wheel that may be due to a worn steering rack and pinion.

A worn ball joint can cause a 'crack' noise and depending on the wear, vibration that will be felt through the steering wheel. A worn ball joint can also cause the car to pull to one side.

A humming noise suggests it is either a brake rotor/pad, or a worn driveshaft or wheel bearing.

Feb 17, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How many lubrication fittings are there on a 1999 Buick LaSabre?


if this has a conventional front end(not front wheel drive) then there will be one on each outer tie rod end one on each inner tie rod end, both upper and lower ball joints on each side, idler arm and pitman arm. if its front wheel drive it will have a rack and pinion steering. there for there will be one on each outer tie rod end and one on each lower ball joint, if they have grease fittings. so conventional steering has 10 fittings total and rack and pinion has 4 total.

Jul 28, 2015 | Buick Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Rack pinion


There is one adjustment to the steering gear, but this doesn't remove very much play in the steering. And once set, I have never seen them back off ( it's the big nut on the back of the rack, break it loose, then turn the inner nut, Just a little through. You get it to tight and it will be hard to turn). If you have a lot of play, look at the tierod ends, inner and out. There are also two universal joints on the steering shaft that could cause a lot of play. One by the rack and one under the dash. There are bushings/bearing that hold the steering shaft in place, These don't cause much left or right play, they will cause the steering wheel to be sloppy at the column.

Sep 07, 2014 | 2004 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

Lots of shaking from side to side.


Could be a bad tire ( or bent rim Have balance checked), ball joint, idler arm, wheel bearing, steering tie rod end or defective rack and pinion unit. Lift vehicle about 1 inch off ground ( do each side independently) Use a pry bar and pry from ground up and down on wheel. Much play? bad ball joint. With both hands, try to move wheel side to side. Much play? could be a tie rod end or bad wheel bearing. Visually check play of steering arm into rack and pinion unit, more than about a half inch play, bad rack and pinion unit. Try to move back and forth with hands top and bottom. Much play? Bad ball joint or wheel bearing, verify visually that it is ball joint moving, else it is the wheel bearing. Manually check for play in each joint in steering control rods from steering knuckle all the way through each rod where there is a joint. Replace the one you find excessive play in. Check mounting studs for sway bar for loose fit, deteriorated rubber bushings or a crack / break in the sway bar. Replace if needed. That's about all I can think of unless it only happens when applying brakes, in which case it could be a warped rotor.

Aug 21, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Steering wheel movement


Could be your tie rods coming out of the rack and pinion and attached to the wheels. Grasp the tie rod near where it attaches to the wheel and see if you can shake, twist or move it. If you feel any play or looseness at all in the tie rod joint, then it is worn badly. Both outer tie rods at each wheel should be replaced. If the outer tie rods are tight, you can't move them with your hands, then have a shop check your inner tie rods for wear. Have them check the ball joints for wear, also. Or you can raise the wheel off the ground. Be safety conscious. Grab the tire at top and bottom. Can the tire move in and out, feel play in the lower ball joints? Any side to side play in the wheel? Maybe you can spot the looseness at the tie rod or balljoint. Maybe you'd better let a shop look at it.
A CV joint wouldn't have those symptoms. A wheel bearing possibly, but usually accompanied by a grinding noise. Have it checked out.

Jun 20, 2012 | 1999 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

Play in stering linkage


The most common of all problems in a steering system is excessive steering wheel play. Steering wheel play is normally caused by worn ball sockets, worn idler arm, or too much clearance in the steering gearbox. Typically, you shou Id not be able to turn the steering wheel more than 1 1/ 2 inches without causing the front wheels to move. If the steering wheel rotates excessively, a serious steering problem exists.

An effective way to check for play in the steering linkage or rack-and-pinion mechanism is by the dry-park test. With the full weight of the vehicle on the front wheels, have someone move the steering wheel from side to side while you examine the steering system for looseness. Start your inspection at the steering column shaft and work your way to the tie-rod ends. Ensure that the movement of one component causes an equal amount of movement of the adjoining component.

Watch for ball studs that wiggle in their sockets. With a rack-and-pinion steering system, squeeze the rubber boots and feel the inner tie rod to detect wear. If the tie rod moves sideways in relation to the rack, the socket is worn and should be replaced.

Another way of inspecting the steering system involves moving the steering components and front wheel BY HAND. With the steering wheel locked, raise the vehicle and place it on jack stands. Then force the front wheels right and left while checking for component looseness.

Jun 10, 2012 | 2004 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

When making some left hand turns steering pulls to the left then you hear a clunk on the right side and steering is normal


Lift the front of the car and remove the front wheels. Check all rubber bushings and linkages. Compare each side with each other. Check the steering control arms and the ball joints for any play. Check the rack is securely mounted. Swing the steering from full lock to left, inspect everything and then full lock to the right with full inspection. Check your power steering for any leaks etc.

Sep 09, 2010 | 1994 Dodge Stealth

1 Answer

2001, A4 Audi sterring rack play


When the ball joint is bad, it must be replaced.

Oct 08, 2009 | 2001 Audi A4

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