Question about 1998 Honda Civic

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I have no spark to the plugs while cranking. replaced ignition control module, ignition coil and main power relay. Also verified integrity of timing belt. Any other components involved besides the engine ECU?

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The key has a transponder inbuilt,if the car is not reccognising it, the car will just turn over but not fire up.....

Posted on Jul 06, 2010

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Car cranks but wont start? No spark. Changed ecm relay no help. Ignition harness is good. No fault codes. Battery is good. changed ignition relay, no help. I think its the ECM but need more info to spend...


Yes, the ECM is the last thing to replace after all other possibilities. No spark could be bad ignition coil, bad Ignition Control Module (controls the coil circuits for spark), bad plug wires, the crank and cam sensors (for ECM to determine spark timing).

Check the ICM -it can be tested at a parts store. If good, check the crank sensor.

Mar 16, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I HAVE OPEL VECTRA B(ENGINE X16XEL)MODEL 1999 THE ENGINE SHUTDOWN SUDDENLY DURING DRIVING AND NO FAULTS ARE RECORDED IN THE ECU


Check gas and spark. Check if fuel pump is still working. Do you have fuel pressure? Or can you check the fuel pressure? With key on, the pump should have put fuel under pressure in the lines and up to the injectors.
Check ignition system by checking for spark at one of the spark plug wires, with the engine cranking over. You need to see a blue, snapping spark to know the ignition system is good. If no spark on one wire, check another or all of them. If no spark, and no trouble codes-could be a bad crank position sensor. This sensor helps the computer calculate the timing of the spark, the main sensor the computer uses to signal for spark. It signals to the ignition control module (which controls the coils and the primary current to the coils ((the coils-where high voltage is created to cause spark at the plug)) ). So no spark? Could be a bad crank sensor...or a bad ignition control module...
If you have a single coil and not a coil pack, you might want to test that coil, but if shut down while driving, sounds like computer related, so check ignition controls: that would be crank sensor or ignition control module, or in worst case a bad PCM.

Jan 07, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

No spark ferom coil


Probable Causes: Fuel Pump (P0230 to P0233) PCM (P0600 to P0606) Crank Sensor (P0355 to P0399) Fuel Pressure (P0190 to P0194) Chances are the Check Engine Light is not on, but you may find any of the following codes: P0230 to P0233 Fuel Pump codes P0600 to P0606 PCM related codes P0335 to P0339 Crank Sensor codes P0190 to P0194 Fuel Pressure Sensor codes No spark due to a bad crank position sensor, a faulty ignition module or PCM, a problem in the ignition circuit (ignition switch, antitheft system, wiring, etc.), a faulty park/neutral safety switch, a bad ignition coil (only on engines with a single coil ignition), or wet plugs or plug wires (did it rain last night, did you just wash the engine?) A less common cause is a worn starter that draws so many amps while cranking the engine that there's not enough juice left to adequately power the ignition system and fuel injectors. Contributing factors might be a weak battery and/or loose or corroded battery cables. No fuel because of a dead fuel pump, bad fuel pump relay, blown fuel pump fuse, plugged fuel filter or line, or failed PCM injector driver circuit or injector power supply relay. Or, the fuel tank might be empty (don't believe what the gauge is telling you), or the fuel tank might contain contaminated fuel (water or too much alcohol) or the wrong type of fuel (whoops, somebody put in diesel instead of gasoline). No compression because the timing belt or chain is broken, the timing belt or chain is loose and jumped out of time, or the overhead camshaft has snapped.

Dec 20, 2013 | 2000 Hyundai Sonata

1 Answer

89 Comanche 4.0 inline 6cyl no power to pump and now no spark as well?


I'll try to help you, John.
For spark: If your spark plugs, spark plug wires, dist. cap, and rotor are good, check the coil. Take off the negative battery cable. Use an ohmmeter and check resistance between the coil primary positive terminal and the frame of the coil-ohmmeter should show infinite resistance, if not, replace coil. Put ohmmeter positive lead on coil primary positive terminal, and ohmmeter negative lead on coil primary negative terminal-resistance should be zero or nearly zero, if not, replace coil. Connect ohmmeter negative lead to the negative primary terminal and ohmmeter positive lead to the high voltage terminal of the coil. Ohmmeter should not show infinite resistance, if it does, replace coil.
If coil is good (or has been swapped), check that coil primary has power to it with key on. If it does, and no spark, the problem could be the ignition module or the pickup coil. The ignition module should be mounted with the ignition coil. The pickup coil is inside the distributor-this pickup coil is what tells the computer (ecu) the crankshaft position, so is critical for spark timing.

For the pump: the fuel pump relay is in the power distribution box under the hood. When the ignition switch's run wire energizes the relay's coil, power is sent to the pump. You could check for a signal on the pump wire at the tank, with the engine cranking Should be a steady signal then. If not, pull the relay out to check that the power feed for the pump is still there. The power to the relay comes from Fuse link G, a 20 amp rated green fuse link. It is hot at all times, so check for a power signal on one of the relay terminals with key off. One terminal should have power. If not, check fuse link G. If it does have power, put relay back in and have someone cycle the key-relay should click-may feel or hear it. If nothing, try a different relay. If relay was good, but no power to pump, pull relay and check terminals that relay plugs into: with key held in crank, two terminals at relay should have power-the power feed from fuse link G, and now the ignition switch signal to the relay coil side. If all checks out, probably a bad pump. If you checked for power at the tank with the engine cranking, and did have power, that is for sure a pump that needs replacing.
Good luck.

Sep 06, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

99 dodge durango


Could be a problem in the ignition circuit. Check or test coil and ignition module-one of them may be shutting down or shorting out when they get hot.
Verify by checking for spark at a plug wire immediately after it shuts off: if no spark, it is an ignition problem. Besides the coil and ignition module, other possibilities are the crank position sensor, cam position sensor, ecu, the ASD relay (automatic shuit down relay-it's in the power distribution box under hood). If that relay fails, all power is cut to coil and fuel injectors, and maybe the fuel pump also.
Good luck.

Dec 20, 2012 | 1994 Oldsmobile 88

1 Answer

P1351


That code is for the ignition control circuit. It is the white wire that runs from Ignition module to the VCM. this controls the timing.

This is either a bad wire/connection from the VCM to the ignition module, ignition module, or VCM. I would check them closely in that order. This can commonly be a bad ditributor

Tests/Procedures:
1. Use an air gap spark tester set at 25-30 KV and check the output from the coil wire and then at multiple spark plug wires.
2. Bring the engine to Top Dead Center (TDC) #1 and verify the rotor is pointing to the 8 that is cast into the distributor housing to make sure it is not out of time.
3. If the distributor is dropped correctly, but spark is erratic at the plugs but good at the coil, replace the distributor cap and rotor with one from the dealer.

Potential Causes:
Distributor Cap
Incorrect Distributor Timing
Ignition Rotor

Tech Tips:
This trouble code can set from extended cranking and is most likely not the cause of the problem as long as there is spark
Tests/Procedures:
1. Using a Digital Volt Ohm Meter (DVOM) or lab scope, check the White wire at the ignition module pin B while cranking. This should be a 0-5 volt square wave pattern any time the engine is cranking or running.
2. If there is more than 5 volts on the White wire at pin B, check the White wire from the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) to the ignition module pin B for shorts to voltage.
3. If the wire checks OK, check powers and grounds to the PCM while cranking. If the powers and grounds are OK at the PCM, the PCM will need to be replaced.

Potential Causes:
Ground Ignition Module Power
Powertrain Control Module (PCM) Wiring
Tech Tips:
Conditions for Setting the DTC The Ignition Control voltage is more than 4.9 volts.


Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I'll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using Fixya, and have a nice day

Dec 19, 2011 | 1995 Ford F350

1 Answer

Timing the cams and crank with a belt


  1. Note: Electronic Ignition engine timing is entirely controlled by the PCM. Electronic Ignition engine timing is NOT adjustable. Do not attempt to check base timing. You will receive false readings.

The CKP sensor is used to indicate crankshaft position and speed by sensing a missing tooth on a pulse wheel mounted to the crankshaft. The CMP sensor is used by the COP Integrated EI System to identify top dead center of compression of cylinder 1 to synchronize the firing of the individual coils.
  1. The PCM uses the CKP signal to calculate a spark target and then fires the coil pack(s) to that target shown in Figure 51. The PCM uses the CMP sensor not shown in Figure 51 on COP Integrated EI Systems to identify top dead center of compression of cylinder 1 to synchronize the firing of the individual coils.
  1. The coils and coil packs receive their signal from the PCM to fire at a calculated spark target. Each coil within the pack fires two spark plugs at the same time. The plugs are paired so that as one fires during the compression stroke the other fires during the exhaust stroke. The next time the coil is fired the situation is reversed. The COP system fires only one spark plug per coil and only on the compression stroke.

    The PCM acts as an electronic switch to ground in the coil primary circuit. When the switch is closed, battery positive voltage (B+) applied to the coil primary circuit builds a magnetic field around the primary coil. When the switch opens, the power is interrupted and the primary field collapses inducing the high voltage in the secondary coil windings and the spark plug is fired. A kickback voltage spike occurs when the primary field collapses. The PCM uses this voltage spike to generate an Ignition Diagnostic Monitor (IDM) signal. IDM communicates information by pulsewidth modulation in the PCM.
  1. The PCM processes the CKP signal and uses it to drive the tachometer as the Clean Tach Out (CTO) signal.

2.5L V6

The ignition system consists of an ignition coil, spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The crankshaft position sensor signal is the basis for ignition timing calculations. The alternating voltage signal from the crankshaft position sensor is digitized by a pulse former within the powertrain control module. This digitized signal is then used to position the closing time of the primary circuit of the ignition coil.
Ignition timing is determined by the powertrain control module in response to engine operating conditions based on stored data tables or maps. Once ignition timing has been determined, the powertrain control module interrupts the current to the primary circuit of the ignition coil thus triggering the ignition spark which is supplied to the cylinders through the spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The ignition coils are triggered by the powertrain control module in pairs (cylinders 1 and 5, cylinders 4 and 3 and cylinders 2 and 6) sending one ignition spark to the firing cylinder and one ignition spark to the corresponding cylinder on the exhaust stroke. This ensures that any unburnt fuel residues remaining in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke are re - ignited to provide cleaner exhaust emissions.
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2.0L 4 cynder

The ignition system consists of an ignition coil, spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The crankshaft position sensor signal is the basis for ignition timing calculations. The alternating voltage signal from the crankshaft position sensor is digitized by the powertrain control module. This digitized signal is then used to position the closing time of the primary circuit of the ignition coil.
Ignition angle is determined by the powertrain control module in response to engine operating conditions. Once ignition angle has been determined, the powertrain control module interrupts the current to the primary circuit of the ignition coil thus triggering the ignition spark which is supplied to the cylinders through the spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The ignition coils are triggered by the powertrain control module in pairs (cylinders 1 and 4 and cylinders 3 and 2) sending one ignition spark to the firing cylinder and one ignition spark to the corresponding cylinder on the exhaust stroke. This make sures that any unburnt fuel residues remaining in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke are re - ignited to provide cleaner exhaust emissions.
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Integrated Electronic Ignition System The Integrated Electronic Ignition (EI) System consists of a crankshaft position (CKP) sensor, coil pack(s), connecting wiring, and PCM. The Coil On Plug (COP) Integrated EI System uses a separate coil for each spark plug and each coil is mounted directly onto the plug. The COP Integrated EI System eliminates the need for spark plug wires but does require input from the camshaft position (CMP) sensor.
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Apr 05, 2009 | 1998 Ford Contour

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