Question about 1998 Volvo S90

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I replaced the timing belt on my volvo s90 and now it won't start, it cranks but won't turn. I checked to make sure the timing is "on the money". I also checked to make sure the tensioner and cam shaft sensor are working. While cranking, I noticed the tach does not move, I don't know if that sheds light on the situation or not.I also checked for compression in the cylinders. At this point, I'm guessing it could be the crank sensor. Can someone tell me where that is on this car? Thanks

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  • bncrod271 Jul 05, 2010

    i would like some sort of diagnosis as to possible problems. one response already told me where the crank sensor is, but i would like to see some other possible causes. thanks

  • bncrod271 Jul 05, 2010

    thanks!!

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5 Answers

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For Volvo S90 - 2,9 liters six in line engine, the crankshaft position (CKP) sensor is placed on back side of th,e engine, towards flywheel. See picture below:

I replaced the timing belt - 85cfd89.jpg

Posted on Jul 05, 2010

  • bncrod271 Jul 05, 2010

    thanks! any ideas on what might be the problem if the crank sensor is ok?

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Will sit on the back of the motor.I replaced the timing belt - eeb2cdc.gif

Posted on Jul 05, 2010

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The crank position sensor is easy to replace. Its right on top of the transmission. It only takes 5 minutes to get it in and out. Even the sensor is not that expensive as far as sensors go. To buy this crankshaft sensor for your Volvo s90 you can get it from this website.Click the link below http://www.buyyourcar.co.uk/car-parts/volvo/s90/part/crankshaft
Thanks. Keep updated for any more query. You can rate this solution and show your appreciation.

Posted on Jul 05, 2010

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Do you get spark at the plugs? If not replace TDC sensor. Don't know precisely the location. It should be towards the lower end of the timing belt at the lower side of the engine.

Posted on Jul 05, 2010

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Volvo 240/740/760/780/940/960 1990-1998
Crankshaft Position Sensor - Repair Guide

OPERATION
(see Figure 1)

I replaced the timing belt - aabb350.jpg

Fig. 1: The CKP sensor and pulse wheel


The Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor, sometimes called an RPM and/or impulse sensor, is used to determine engine speed and Top Dead Center (TDC). This ensures precise ignition timing. The sensor is located at the rear of the engine block, above the flywheel. Engine speed is transmitted to the fuel control unit. The engine will not start without this signal.

LH Jetronic and EZK Ignition System Vehicles
On the pulsewheel, there are 60 markings for the CKP sensor, 58 which are drilled holes to provide information to the ignition control unit. There are no holes at 2 of the markings. These are 90 degrees Before Top Dead Center (BTDC), for cylinders No. 1 and No. 4. Ignition timing is based on these markings and other information such as engine load and temperature. This means that ignition timing can be controlled and that there is no need for the ignition setting to be adjusted.

Regina Engine Control and REX-1 Ignition Systems
On the pulsewheel, there are 44 markings for the CKP sensor, 40 which are drilled holes to provide information to the ignition control unit. There are no holes at 2 of the markings. These are 90 degrees Before Top Dead Center (BTDC), for cylinders No. 1 and No. 4. Ignition timing is based on these markings and other information such as engine load and temperature. This means that ignition timing can be controlled and that there is no need for ignition setting to be adjusted.

Motronic Engine Control Systems
The flywheel has a series of holes located on the top surface. As the holes pass the CKP sensor, the holes induce a voltage in the coil of the sensor. The passage of several holes generates an A/C signal, the frequency of which is a function of the number of holes passing per second and the voltage of which can vary between 0.1 and 55 vdc, depending on engine speed and temperature.

At 90° TDC for cylinder 1 there is a longer hole. When the longer gap passes the sensor, the voltage stops, and the ECM can calculate camshaft position.



TESTING
(see Figures 2 and 3)


3345c27.jpg

Fig. 2: CKP sensor terminal identification

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Unplug the sensor connector.
  3. Using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance across the two sensor terminals.
  4. Resistance should be between 200-500 ohms. If the resistance is out of range, replace the sensor.



Fig. 3: Testing the CMP sensor resistance (click over pic for zoom)





REMOVAL & INSTALLATION
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Remove any components necessary to access the sensor.
  3. Unplug the sensors connector.
  4. Remove the two retaining screws and remove the sensor from the engine.
To install:
  1. Install the sensor into place and tighten the retaining bolts.
  2. Plug in the connector.
  3. Install any components removed to access the sensor.
  4. Connect the negative battery cable.


Hope helps.

Posted on Jul 05, 2010

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