Question about 1999 Dodge Ram

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Is it save to change rear shock on my ram with the vehicle being on the ground?

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  • Dodge Master
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Yes no problem

Posted on Jul 03, 2010

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Rear end went out on 2000 tundra need instructions how to install it


Block the front tires, jack up the rear end. Remove driveshaft from rear end. Loosen but do not remove the leaf springs and the shock absorbers. Remove the brake lines and the emergency brake cable. Return vehicle to ground and finish removing the leaf springs and the shock absorbers. The vehicle will have to be slightly raised to do this. The other option is to replace the ring and pinion as a unit which requires a completely different set of instructions. What will you be doing, replacing the entire axle and housing or just the ring and pinion?

Apr 18, 2014 | 2000 Toyota Tundra

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When should I replace my shocks and or struts When a vehicle is brought into an...


When should I replace my shocks and or struts
When a vehicle is brought into an auto repair shop for routine vehicle maintenance, the auto technician may suggest that the vehicle shocks or struts need to be replaced. Learn the function of a car or trucks shocks and struts. Find out why the shocks and struts need to be replaced and how someone can tell if they’re bad.

The Purpose or Function of a Cars Shocks and Struts

Shocks and struts serve the same purpose. They’re main function is to keep the vehicle from bouncing. A vehicle has front and rear springs to cushion the vehicle over rough road conditions. If there were no shocks or struts the vehicle would continue to bounce excessively. The shocks and struts prevent the car from bouncing by damping the springs.

What’s the Difference Between Shocks and Struts?

Shocks are usually used to dampen leaf springs, where as a strut is used to dampen coil springs. Shocks are usually a single cylinder in the open where as a strut is normally surrounded by the coil spring and are more massive and complicated.

That’s why struts normally cost a lot more to replace than a shock. On a car the front suspension usually has struts and the rear usually has shocks. Some trucks have shocks on the front and rear. Other than those distinctions, shocks and struts serve exactly the same purpose.

Why Should the Cars Shocks or Struts be replaced?

Keeping in mind that the purpose of shocks and struts is to keep the vehicle from bouncing, the following is some of the reasons why they should be replaced.

* An excessively bouncing car can be an uncomfortable driving experience.
* The vehicle can be harder to control leading to an unsafe condition.
* Excessive strain can be put on other vehicle components causing premature failure.
* Bad shocks or struts will cause the tires to bounce and create spotty or choppy wear on the vehicles tires.

How to Tell if a Cars Shocks or Struts are Bad

1. Shocks and struts can be oil or air filled. If they are leaking oil or air they need to be replaced. Consumer beware, some dishonest auto repair shops will squirt oil on the shocks, show the customer the leaky shocks and tell them they need to be replaced.
2. Another method is the bounce test. Put all your weight on the front or rear of the vehicle and push down on the vehicle. Let go of the vehicle and stand back to see of it bounces. If the vehicle comes back up without bouncing, the shocks are probably in good shape. If the vehicle bounces a few times, chances are the shocks or struts need to be replaced.

Shocks and struts are wear items, not maintenance items. There’s no set mileage or time limit when they should be replaced. If the tires seem to have a choppy wear pattern or the vehicle bounces excessively over bumps, the shocks need to be checked.

Look at the struts or shocks and see if they’re leaking. Perform the bounce test and see if the vehicle bounces. Replacing the vehicle shocks and struts when they’re bad will create a safer and more comfortable driving experience, not to mention saving money in the long run.

on Dec 14, 2009 | Honda Accord Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to change front shocks


The old style shock is not hard to change. Its when you have struts that extra tools are needed.
There is a nut or two on the top of each shock stem. The second nut is often used as a locking device to keep the primary nut from backing off. Many do not use a second nut, but use a washer or lock washer to keep the primary tight.
The bottom fixtures usually have a pair of bolts holding the shock mounting plate to the "A" frame of the suspension.
Some Mechanics keep the weight of the vehicle on the "A" frame when changing the shocks to increase the clearance provided between the ground and the van(floor jack). A van on the hoist has exceptional clearance and it does not matter if the suspension hangs down, you still can fit the shock into its position.
Most nuts and bolts on the front are 9/16th or smaller. The rear shocks use larger bolts.
I would jack the vehicle and spray the backside of the lower bolts with WD-40 or similar a day before attempting to remove the bolts. Broken bolts are a pain, this one procedure could make removal easier. The bolts can easily break from rust.
There are sometimes Sales at Sears or Goodyear or Midas with free Installation. Shops use to charge $5-$10 each to install shocks.

Jun 10, 2013 | 1985 Ford Econoline

1 Answer

Ttrying to fine out where to put the air for the airshock


Vehicles: Cadillacs with ALC-controlled rear shock absorbers

Each rear shock absorber has an ALC (air) port. One may disconnect the ALC air line and try to add air, but this is unlikely to work, since there is no spring-loaded valve to close the port off immediately (like a tire).

A better method for inflating the rear shocks to see if they hold air is to supply 12V DC (from the battery) directly to the ALC system (air) compressor.

Debugging your Cadillac's ALC system can be a challenge. Here are a few basics.

Here's a depiction of the ALC port on the rear shock - found at the end of the ALC air tube.


12_2_2011_12_54_42_am.jpg

Fig. 1 The ALC connection on the rear shock absorber

Here's a close-up of the Cadillac ALC port on the rear shock


12_2_2011_12_59_49_am.jpg

Fig.2 Cadillac ALC air line fitting

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Automatic Level Control System - General Description
Vehicles Without Road Sensing Suspension

The Automatic Level Control (ALC) system automatically adjusts the rear height of the vehicle in response to changes in vehicle loading.

The ALC system consists of a height sensor, an air compressor assembly, an ALC compressor relay, an intake hose and filter, an air tube, and two rear shock absorbers . The air compressor assembly consists of an air compressor and an air dryer mounted on a bracket. The air compressor head is a replaceable part of the air compressor. The (air) exhaust solenoid is a non-replaceable part of the air compressor head.

The compressor is activated when the ignition is on, and weight is added to the vehicle. The exhaust solenoid is connected directly to the battery (+), enabling the system to exhaust with the ignition on or off when excess weight is removed.

Vehicles With Road Sensing Suspension
The Automatic Level Control (ALC) system automatically adjusts the rear height of the vehicle in response to changes in vehicle loading.

The ALC system consists of the CVRSS control module, two CVRSS position sensors, an air compressor assembly, an ALC compressor relay, an intake hose and filter, an air tube, and two rear shock absorbers. The air compressor assembly consists of an air compressor and an air dryer mounted on a bracket. The air compressor head is a replaceable part of the air compressor. The exhaust solenoid is a non-replaceable part of the air compressor head.

The vehicles rear vertical height is measured by the two CVRSS position sensors. These two position sensors convert this rear height measurement into an analog voltage (0 to 5 volts DC) which is read by the CVRSS control module. The control module then determines what action (exhaust, compress, or no action) shall take place. To compress, the CVRSS control module switches the low-side of the ELC compressor relay to ground.

The air compressor is enabled (switched to battery only when the ignition is on. The air compressor is activated when a sufficient amount of weight has been added to the vehicle.

The exhaust solenoid is enabled at all times. The exhaust solenoid is activated when weight is removed from the vehicle.

Automatic Level Control System Operation w/o F45

Raising the Vehicle
When a load is added to the vehicle, the vehicle body moves down causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate upward. The upward arm movement activates an internal timing circuit and, after an initial fixed delay of 17 to 27 seconds, the sensor provides a ground to complete the compressor relay circuit. The 12V (+) circuit to the compressor is then complete and the compressor runs, sending pressurized air to the shock absorbers through the air tubes.

As the shock absorbers inflate, the vehicle body moves upward rotating the actuating arm towards its original position. Once the body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the sensor opens the compressor relay circuit, and the compressor is turned off.

Air Compressor Head Relief Sequence
In order to reduce current draw during air compressor starting, the height sensor performs an air compressor head relief sequence before air compressor operation. This sequence reduces the air pressure in the air compressor cylinder during start-up. The air compressor head relief sequence occurs as follows:

Exhaust solenoid is energized.
Air compressor is activated 1.3 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is energized.
Exhaust solenoid is de-energized 0.5 seconds after the air compressor is activated.
Lowering the Vehicle
When a load is removed from the rear of the vehicle, the body rises, causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate downward. This again activates the internal timing circuit. After the initial fixed delay, the sensor provides a ground to complete the exhaust solenoid circuit, energizing the solenoid. Now, air starts exhausting out of the shock absorbers, back through the air dryer and exhaust solenoid valve, and into the atmosphere.

As the vehicle body lowers, the actuating arm rotates to its original position. When the vehicle body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the sensor opens the exhaust solenoid circuit, which closes the exhaust solenoid and prevents air from escaping.

Air Replenishment Cycle
The sensor actuating arm position is checked when the ignition is turned on. If the sensor indicates that no height adjustment is needed, an internal timer circuit is activated. After about 35 to 55 seconds, the compressor is turned on for 3 to 5 seconds. This ensures that the shock absorbers are filled with the proper residual pressure. If weight is added to or removed from the vehicle during the time delay, the air replenishment cycle is overridden, and the vehicle rises or lowers after the normal delay.

Automatic Level Control System Operation w/ F45

Raising the Vehicle
When a load is added to the vehicle, the vehicle body moves down causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate upward. The upward arm movement activates an internal timing circuit and, after an initial fixed delay, the CVRSS control module provides a ground to complete the compressor relay circuit. The 12V (+) circuit to the compressor is then complete and the compressor runs, sending pressurized air to the shock absorbers through the air tubes.

As the shock absorbers inflate, the vehicle body moves upward rotating the actuating arm towards its original position. Once the body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the compressor relay circuit is opened and the compressor is turned off.

Air Compressor Head Relief Sequence
In order to reduce current draw during air compressor starting, the CVRSS control module performs an air compressor head relief sequence before air compressor operation. This sequence reduces the air pressure in the air compressor cylinder during start-up. The air compressor head relief sequence occurs as follows:

Exhaust solenoid is energized.
Air compressor is activated 1.3 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is energized.
Exhaust solenoid is de-energized 0.5 seconds after the air compressor is activated.

Lowering the Vehicle
When a load is removed from the rear of the vehicle, the body rises, causing the sensor actuating arm to rotate downward. This again activates the internal timing circuit. After the initial fixed delay, the CVRSS control module provides a ground to complete the exhaust solenoid circuit, energizing the solenoid. Now, air starts exhausting out of the shock absorbers, back through the air dryer and exhaust solenoid valve, and into the atmosphere.

As the vehicle body lowers, the actuating arm rotates to its original position. When the vehicle body reaches its original height, +/- 25 mm (+/- 1 in), the exhaust solenoid circuit is opened, which closes the exhaust solenoid and prevents air from escaping.

Air Replenishment Cycle
An air replenishment cycle (ARC) is commanded after each ignition-ON cycle. The purpose of the ARC is to ensure that the ALC system is operating at or above minimum air pressure (residual air pressure). The ARC occurs as follows:

The EXHAUST SOLENOID IS ENERGIZED 20 seconds after the ignition has been turned on.
The AIR COMPRESSOR IS ACTIVATED 1.3 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is energized.
The EXHAUST SOLENOID IS DE-ENERGIZED 0.5 seconds after the air compressor is activated.
The AIR COMPRESSOR IS DEACTIVATED 3.2 seconds after the exhaust solenoid is de-energized.

Dec 01, 2011 | 1998 Cadillac DeVille

3 Answers

Air suspension system isn't working, can I change to regular shocks?


Yes that is a easy fix. These air suspensions go in these cars and your driving on the ground bouncing all over the road. To repair the original air suspension would could cost $1000 or more-it's just not worth it. Buy at the autoparts store replacment Coil springs for the rear. Disconnect your rear shocks. It's a good idea to replace these too. Jack up the rear of the car and use jack stands. Remove all of the original air suspension, air bags, linkage, air pump lever and disconnect the lines and wires. Install new coil springs and shocks. That's all there is to it.
If you are going to do the job yourself buy a Haynes repair manual for your car and same year at any auto parts store @ Advanced, Autozone. Read the step by step in the manual. I have used these for 40 years with all my vehicles and saved tons of cash in labor costs.
Good luck and thanks for your question and I hope my suggestions help. burdfrenzy
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Jan 04, 2011 | 1991 Lincoln Town Car

1 Answer

How do I change the rear differential?


jack it up so the rear axle is off the ground. unhook the ebrake cables at the vehicle unbolt the rear driveline remove the rear wheels unbolt the rear shocks with the jack under the center of the rear end, disconnect any anti lock wiring plugs remove if it has leaf springs remove the u bolts that bolt the rear end to the spring by taking off the nuts from the bottom. lift out rear assembly . If it has springs remove the springs after the shocks are unmounted from the rear axle. piece of cake reverse the procedure

Dec 08, 2010 | 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Instructions for replacing shocks & struts


Ok first off if the vehicle is equipped with air ride you need to turn the air ride off or you will blow out the rear bags when the rear is off the ground.

For the front Remove the wheel. Take off the upper shock nut. Now remover the two lower retaining nuts. Compress the shock and pull it out. Install in reverse order. Before installing the new shock push the piston completely down and allow it to return. Do this 2 to 3 times.

For the rear remove the wheel support the rear end with jack stands at the jack points. Now use your jack (not a scissor jack) and place it under the rear diff to support the rear diff. If you have another set of jack stands use them and support the rear axle as it sits.

Remove the lower shock bolt. Now remove the two upper shock bolts and the shock will come right out.



Jul 02, 2010 | 1998 Ford Explorer

1 Answer

Do i have to remove the back seat to take rear struts off


Answer
REMOVAL - SHOCK ASSEMBLY
NOTE: Access for the nuts attaching the rear shock assembly upper mount to the vehicle is through the inside of the trunk.

Roll back carpeting on top of the rear shock tower to access shock mounting nuts.
Remove plastic cover from the top of the shock assembly.
Remove 2 nuts attaching the shock assembly upper mount/spring seat to the shock tower.
Raise vehicle on jackstands or centered on a frame contact type hoist. (Refer to LUBRICATION & MAINTENANCE/HOISTING - STANDARD PROCEDURE)
Remove the rear wheel and tire assembly from the vehicle.
Remove two fasteners holding the splash shield to the shock assembly upper mount.
Remove bolt attaching shock absorber to rear knuckle (Shock Absorber Attachment To Knuckle).
Remove the shock absorber from the rear knuckle first when removing the shock absorber from vehicle by pushing down on the rear suspension.
Move shock assembly downward and tilt top of shock outward, then remove shock assembly from vehicle through top of wheel opening

Nov 23, 2009 | 2002 Dodge Stratus

1 Answer

Rear shock absorber ,how to change rear shock


Loosen the wheel-nuts. Jack-up the car and support on level ground. Take out tires. Replace old shocks with new.

Nov 02, 2009 | 1994 Plymouth Acclaim

1 Answer

2004 dodge stratus SE


This is a dangerous job if you do not have the proper equipment for compressing the spring that is around the rear shock. I do not recomend performing this job without the proper equipment. Unloading the spring without it compressed can cuase injury.

If you have the proper equipment this is how you do it.

REMOVAL - SHOCK ASSEMBLY NOTE: Access for the nuts attaching the rear shock assembly upper mount to the vehicle is through the inside of the trunk.
  1. Roll back carpeting on top of the rear shock tower to access shock mounting nuts.
  2. Remove plastic cover from the top of the shock assembly.
  3. Remove 2 nuts attaching the shock assembly upper mount/spring seat to the shock tower.
  4. Raise vehicle on jackstands or centered on a frame contact type hoist.
  5. Remove the rear wheel and tire assembly from the vehicle.
  6. Remove two fasteners holding the splash shield to the shock assembly upper mount.
  7. Remove bolt attaching shock absorber to rear knuckle
  8. Remove the shock absorber from the rear knuckle first when removing the shock absorber from vehicle by pushing down on the rear suspension.
  9. Move shock assembly downward and tilt top of shock outward, then remove shock assembly from vehicle through top of wheel opening.

Aug 04, 2008 | 2004 Dodge Neon

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