Question about 1990 Nissan Hardbody King Cab

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Why does a fuel injected nissan v-6 3000 engine act like it's flooding? If i cover the air intake valve with my hand it will rev up but if i don't it will not.

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Hello! I suspect a defective Throttle Position Sensor (TPS)...It can be tested...It is bolted to the throttle body...Has a three wire connector...Wire colors are...Pink/Black...White...And Black...Push the pointed end of a safety pin into the rear of the connector on two pins...Pink/Black...And White...Connect the + lead of a voltmeter to the White wire...And the- to the Pink/Black..With key on...Reading must be less than 1 volt (.85)...If not the TPS needs to be replaced...Cost is around $50...

Guru......Saailer

Posted on Jul 03, 2010

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Flooding prob. dcoe


Carb flooding is an indication there is a problem with the floats, valves or adjustment but your description is not of flooding but rather suggestive of a haze of fuel being expelled from the carb barrels. My apologies in advance if I have misunderstood.

This phenomenon is fairly typical of high performance engines where the intake valves close so rapidly it causes a shock to the column of incoming air that rebounds through the intake manifold and out through the carb resulting in the characteristic fuel haze. If the fuel haze is allowed to disperse and be lost to the next intake stroke the engine can be down on power, use more fuel and be an increased fire risk.

Some manufacturers use an air box around the carb intakes to perform this function and to help silence the intake roar. Serious designers specify ram pipes or bellmouths large enough to contain the haze and prevent it dispersing and some use both methods and fit an air box over the ram pipes to silence the roar, contain some filtration and allow an intake hose to be fitted so air can be drawn from a cooler area than high in the engine compartment...

I hope this helps.

Jul 03, 2017 | Alfa Cars & Trucks

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FPR - Fuel Pressure Regulator


<p><b><span>2.1) <span> </span><u>FPR - Fuel Pressure Regulator </u>(actuator/passive)<u></u></span></b><br /> <p><b><u><span><span> </span></span></u></b><br /> <p><b><span>What is it?</span></b><span><span> </span>The fuel pressure regulator is a mechanical device that maintains a well regulated level of pressure in the fuel rail to the fuel injectors. <span> </span></span><br /> <p><span> </span><br /> <p><b><span>Where is it located?</span></b><span><span> </span>The FPR is a metal circular device most usually located on the end of the fuel rail on the engine. Attached to its top is a vacuum line from the intake plenum. </span><br /> <p><span> </span><br /> <p><b><span>How does it work?</span></b><span> The fuel pump(s) supply fuel at high pressure to the fuel rail. Excess fuel pressure, above that required for satisfactory injector operation, is released by the FPR by allowing fuel to return to the tank via the fuel return pipe.<span> </span>The FPR consists of a diaphragm valve held closed by the constant force exerted by a spring.<span> </span>Once the pressure of the fuel in the fuel rail exceeds the force of the spring on the valve then fuel bleeds past into the return pipe.<span> </span>The action of the spring is opposed by the effect of a vacuum line (from the intake manifold) acting on the diaphragm.<span> </span><b><i>When the car is at idle the high vacuum conveyed in the line from the inlet manifold to the FPR ensures that only a modest pressure of fuel is allowed in the fuel rail to the injectors.<span> </span>As the engine speed increases there is reduction in vacuum, the spring action is less impeded and the fuel pressure increases.<span> </span>By governing the period of each injection cycle at a given fuel pressure the ECU is able to maintain appropriate and economical use of fuel in response to engine demand</i></b>.</span><br /> <p><b><u><span><span> </span></span></u></b><br /> <p><b><u><span>Symptoms of faulty FPR </span></u></b><br /> <p><b><u><span><span> </span></span></u></b><br /> <p><span>A faulty FPR has many similar effects to that of a faulty MAF namely:-</span><br /> <p><span> </span><br /> <ul> <li><b><span>Rough running</span></b><span> - if the diaphragm is inoperative or the vacuum line has a minor leak the fuel pressure in the fuel rail will be increased.<span> </span>The amount of fuel injected per cycle will be poorly regulated and this will make the engine 'lumpy' due to too rich mix.<span> </span>If the vacuum line to the FPR has a major leak or has become disconnected then the introduction of unmetered air into the inlet plenum will cause bad idling due to too lean mix.</span></li> <li><b><span>Difficulty in starting</span></b><span> - there are two effects here: </span></li> <ul> <li><span>1) If, as above, the effect of the vacuum line to the FPR has a small leak then the engine will run rich to the extent that excess fuel may flood the engine.<span> </span></span></li> <li><span>2) Fuel may exit a faulty FPR diaphragm via the vacuum line and enter the intake manifold again either flooding the engine or making it too rich to ignite.<span> </span>In this circumstance the opening of the throttle fully by pressing hard on the accelerator pedal may result in the engine firing as more air is introduced creating a better mixture ratio. </span></li> </ul> <li><b><span>Poor fuel economy - </span></b><span>Rich mixture due to a faulty FPR allowing high pressures in the fuel line will cause excessively high fuel consumption<b></b></span></li> </ul> <p><span><span> </span></span><br /> <p><b><span>How to check?</span></b><span><span> </span>When the engine is at idle, disconnecting the vacuum line to a healthy FPR should result in a temporary surge in engine revs for a few seconds as the immediate loss of vacuum to the FPR causes an immediate build up in fuel pressure. At each injection cycle a little more is injected causing the engine to build up revs.<span> </span>In the next few seconds the gradual ingress of unmetered air into the plenum, also caused by the disconnected vacuum tube, begins to upset the stable idle of the engine. <span> </span>The engine will suffer from rough idle until the vacuum line is reconnected. <span> </span>Most of the injection inputs will be crudely governed by signals received from the MAP sensor and feedback from the oxygen sensor. </span><br /> <p><span> </span><br /> <p><span>A technical check in FPR function is to connect a fuel pressure tester to the fuel rail.<span> </span>There is usually a threaded connection port on the fuel rail consisting of a Schrader type valve; more commonly seen on car tyres.<span> </span>Testing the fuel pressure not only shows whether or not the fuel pressure regulator is capable of maintaining a consistent pressure but it also checks the fuel pumps' capability of providing the necessary pressure. <span> </span>Pressure in the rail should be highest when the throttle is open and lowest at idle.<span> </span>Pressing the pin in the middle of the Schrader valve is a quick way of depressurizing the fuel rail, akin to letting the air out of a tyre. </span><br /> <p><span> </span><br /> <p><b><span>How to Fix?</span></b><span><span> </span>Check for the presence of fuel from the open end of the disconnected vacuum line to help ascertain the health of the FPR diaphragm.<span> </span>If the FPR is faulty it is simple and cheap to replace it.</span><br /> <p><span><br /></span><br /> <p><span><b>NEXT 2.2) ECT - Engine Coolant temperature sensor </b></span><br />

on Jul 22, 2011 | Mercedes-Benz E-Class Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 2006 Toyota 140i manual transmission. Whilst waiting at the stoplight with the engine at idle ,the revs suddenly race up to 4000rpm & come down on its own. What could be the problem .


Following are the reasons for unstable engine rpm:
- Vacuum leak at intake manifold or Cracked intake manifold.
- Idle speed control valve is not re-learned.
- Weak cylinder compression or intake valve clearance is too low.
- Mass Air Flow sensor dirty or faulty.
- Fuel pump pressure is too low or high.
- Accelerator pedal sensor faulty.

Sep 30, 2016 | 2007 Toyota Corolla 140i

1 Answer

2.8 crd injection pump


alldata.com, log in and read that yet?
did you look at this near FSM?
the 21 steps, read them yet?. did you make it to step 21,?
quote
  1. Disconnect negative battery cable.
  2. Remove engine cover and bracket.
  3. Evacuate A/C system.
  4. Remove accessory drive belt.
  5. Remove cooling fan and fan shroud.
  6. Remove charge air cooler outlet hose to intake manifold.
  7. Remove fan support assembly.
  8. Remove timing belt outer cover.
  9. Using special tool VM.1055, remove high pressure injection pump sprocket retaining nut.
  10. Install feet from VM.1067 in injection pump sprocket as shown.
  11. Install inner flange of special tool VM.1067 on injection pump sprocket as shown. Secure flange to feet in injection pump sprocket with Allen bolts supplied with tool.
  12. Screw the high pressure injection pump sprocket holding plate assembly into flange of VM.1067. Using left hand threaded bolt supplied, secure holding pl
  13. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions section. CAUTION High pressure lines deliver diesel fuel under extreme pressure from the injection pump to the fuel injectors. This may be as high as 23,200 psi.(1600 bar). Use extreme caution when inspecting for high pressure fuel leaks. Fuel under this amount of pressure can penetrate skin causing personal injury or death. Inspect for high pressure fuel leaks with a sheet of cardboard. Wear safety goggles and adequate protective clothing when servicing fuel system.
  14. ate assembly to timing belt inner cover.
  15. Disconnect A/C lines at compressor.
  16. Remove charge air inlet hose.
  17. Remove the EGR airflow control valve from the intake manifold.
  18. Remove high pressure injection pump to fuel rail high pressure line.
  19. Disconnect high pressure injection pump quantity control valve electrical connector.
  20. Disconnect fuel supply and return lines at high pressure injection pump.
  21. Remove alternator to intake manifold bracket.
21 Remove high pressure injection pump retaining nuts and remove pump.

Care must be taken not to bend the brake vacuum tube when removing high pressure pump.
unquote:


if you learn a short cut to that, please do post it.

Jan 20, 2014 | 2004 Jeep Liberty

2 Answers

What will make the make it flood its self


An engine will flood if there's too much fuel going in because of a stuck choke, a bad spark not igniting the fuel, failed temperature sensors, bad fuel regulator, timing...the list goes on.

The amount of fuel delivered to a properly functioning injected car is determined by sensors mounted throughout the vehicles air intake system. These sensors work together along with the ecu to control the fuel / air mix delivered to the cylinders.

We would need to isolate the components that have impact on the duration of time the injectors stay open. In troubleshooting it is often best to work backwards.

1. Injectors - Are they leaking? 2. Pressure regulator - is the pressure at the fuel rail the right pressure?? (40psi for most fuel injected cars) 3. TPS- throttle position sensor- is this reading accurately...there are several different styles of these 4. Air flow meter - these also come in several varieties varys from mass air sensor / simple vane meters. 5. during startup there is a seperate circuit called the throttle bypass valve - this also may not be functioning if the flooding is occuring rapidly during startup. If the car starts and runs for a while than floods. this is probably not the culprit. 6. ultimately the ECU could have a problem as it is the link in the chain that ties everything together....though not likely. Any of these these would have the potential to flood a vehicle if they were not functioning properly. The amount of fuel delivered to a properly functioning injected car is determined by sensors mounted throughout the vehicles air intake system. These sensors work together along with the ecu to control the fuel / air mix delivered to the cylinders. We would need to isolate the components that have impact on the duration of time the injectors stay open. In troubleshooting it is often best to work backwards. 1. Injectors - Are they leaking 2. Pressure regulator - is the pressure at the fuel rail the right pressure?? (40psi for most fuel injected cars) 3. TPS- throttle position sensor- is this reading accurately...there are several different styles of these 4. Air flow meter - these also come in several varieties varys from mass air sensor / simple vane meters. 5. during startup there is a seperate circuit called the throttle bypass valve - this also may not be functioning if the flooding is occuring rapidly during startup. If the car starts and runs for a while than floods. this is probably not the culprit. 6. ultimately the ECU could have a problem as it is the link in the chain that ties everything together, but it's not likely.
This is just a list of things that could cause your car to flood!

Feb 24, 2011 | Mazda RX-7 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Truck is fuel injected but you have to spin it


mcdevito75 here, It"s possible but not to the extent the old carbureted engines would flood, Best bet is ti look for a sale some shops run on checking the fuel system, Sears, Pepboys etc.

Jun 17, 2010 | 1986 Ford F150 SuperCab

1 Answer

How do you take off a intake manifold


This is for the 4.6L motor...I'll post for the 5.0L and 5.8L....you didn't post your engine size so please pick the applicable motor:

4.6L Engine
CAUTION Fuel injection systems remain under pressure, even after the engine has been turned OFF. The fuel system pressure must be relieved before disconnecting any fuel lines. Failure to do so may result in fire and/or personal injury.

  1. If equipped with air suspension, the air suspension switch, located on the right-hand side of the luggage compartment, must be turned to the OFF position before raising the vehicle.
  2. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  3. Drain the engine cooling system.
  4. Relieve the fuel system pressure as follows:
    1. Remove the fuel tank fill cap to relieve the pressure in the fuel tank.
    2. Remove the cap from the Schrader valve located on the fuel injection supply manifold.
    3. Attach Fuel Pressure Gauge T80L-9974-B or equivalent, to the Schrader valve and drain the fuel through the drain tube into a suitable container.
    4. After the fuel system pressure is relieved, remove the fuel pressure gauge and install the cap on the Schrader valve. Secure the fuel tank fill cap.
  5. Disconnect the fuel supply and return lines.
  6. Remove the windshield wiper governor (module).
  7. Remove the engine air cleaner outlet tube.
  8. Release the drive belt tensioner and remove the accessory drive belt.
  9. Tag and disconnect the ignition wires from the spark plugs. Disconnect the ignition wire brackets from the cylinder head cover studs.
  10. Disconnect the wiring from both ignition coils and the Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor. Tag and disconnect all ignition wires from both ignition coils. Remove 2 bolts retaining the ignition wire bracket to the ignition coil brackets and remove the ignition wire assembly.
  11. Disconnect the alternator wiring harness from the junction block at the fender apron and alternator. Remove the bolts retaining the alternator brace to the intake manifold and the alternator to the cylinder block and remove the alternator.
  12. Raise and safely support the vehicle.
  13. Disconnect the oil pressure sensor and power steering control valve actuator wiring and position the wiring harness out of the way.
  14. Disconnect the EGR valve to exhaust manifold tube from the right-hand exhaust manifold.
  15. Lower the vehicle.
  16. Remove and detach the engine/transmission harness connector from the retaining bracket on the power brake booster.
  17. Detach the A/C compressor clutch, Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor and the canister purge solenoid wiring connectors.
  18. Remove the PCV valve from the cylinder head cover and disconnect the canister purge vent hose from the PCV valve.
  19. Disconnect the accelerator and cruise control cables from the throttle body. Remove the accelerator cable bracket from the intake manifold and position out of the way.
  20. Disconnect the vacuum hose from the throttle body adapter port.
  21. Disconnect both Heated Oxygen Sensors (HO2S) and the heater water hose.
  22. Remove 2 bolts retaining the thermostat housing to the intake manifold and position the upper hose and thermostat housing out of the way.
The 2 thermostat housing bolts are also used to retain the intake manifold.
  1. Remove 9 bolts retaining the intake manifold to the cylinder heads and remove the intake manifold. Remove and discard the gaskets.
  2. If replacing the intake manifold, swap over the necessary parts.
To install:
  1. Clean all gasket mating surfaces.
  2. Position new intake manifold gaskets on the cylinder heads. Make sure the alignment tabs on the gaskets are aligned with the holes in the cylinder heads.
  3. Install the intake manifold and 9 retaining bolts. Hand tighten the right-rear bolt (viewed from the front of the engine) before final tightening, then torque the bolts, in sequence, to 15-22 ft. lbs. (20-30 Nm).
  4. Inspect and if necessary, replace the O-ring seal on the thermostat housing. Position the housing and upper hose and install 2 retaining bolts. Torque to 15-22 ft. lbs. (20-30 Nm).
  5. Reconnect the heater water hose.
  6. Reconnect both HO2S wiring connectors.
  7. Reconnect the vacuum hose to the throttle body adapter vacuum port.
  8. Install the accelerator cable bracket on the intake manifold and connect the accelerator and cruise control cables to the throttle body.
  9. Install the PCV valve in the cylinder head cover and connect the canister purge solenoid vent hose. Reconnect the A/C compressor clutch, CKP sensor and canister purge solenoid wiring connectors.
  10. Reconnect the engine/transmission harness connector. Install the connector on the retaining bracket on the power brake booster.
  11. Raise and safely support the vehicle.
  12. Reconnect the EGR valve to exhaust manifold tube to the right-hand exhaust manifold. Torque the tube nut to 26-33 ft. lbs. (35-45 Nm).
  13. Reconnect the power steering control valve actuator and the oil pressure sensor wiring connectors.
  14. Lower the vehicle.
  15. Position the alternator and install 2 retaining bolts. Torque to 15-22 ft. lbs. (20-30 Nm). Install 2 bolts retaining the alternator brace to the intake manifold and torque to 71-106 inch lbs. (8-12 Nm).
  16. Reconnect the alternator wiring harness to the alternator, right-hand fender apron and junction block.
  17. Position the ignition wire assembly on the engine and install 2 bolts retaining the ignition wire bracket to the ignition coil brackets. Torque the bolts to 71-106 inch lbs. (8-12 Nm).
  18. Reconnect the ignition wires to the ignition coils in their proper positions. Reconnect the ignition wires to the spark plugs.
  19. Reconnect the ignition wire brackets on the cylinder head cover studs. Reconnect the wiring connectors to both ignition coils and the CMP sensor.
  20. Install the accessory drive belt.
  21. Install the engine air cleaner outlet tube.
  22. Install the windshield wiper governor.
  23. Reconnect the fuel supply and return lines.
  24. Fill and bleed the engine cooling system.
  25. Reconnect the negative battery cable.
  26. If equipped with air suspension, turn the air suspension switch to the ON position.
  27. Start the engine and check for leaks.
  28. Road test the vehicle and check for proper operation.
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4.6L engine intake manifold torque sequence—1996-98 Models

Nov 30, 2009 | 1997 Mercury Grand Marquis

3 Answers

Engine flooding


FLOODING WITH WHAT FUEL OR WATER ??????????????????

Nov 22, 2009 | 1992 Chevrolet C1500

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