Question about 1995 Jaguar XJ6

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Over heating When air condition is running it get hot much faster. Have to turn it off at traffic lights. On open road it does not heat up as high

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95 xj6 = no fan clutch.2 elec.fans,no rad cap either.look for blown fuse, fan sensor unit in rad, if fuse blown=replace a fan unit. above info on flush/fill is important maintance.

Posted on Jun 10, 2010

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The first place would look assuming you have already changed antifreeze and replaced radiator cap is the fan clutch, try moving the fan when the motor is cool does it move freely? if yes then replace the fan clutch. If it is stiff then check that the radiator is not plugged with bugs or dabree if it is take it to a car wash and wash it out in reverse flow from the engine side out, be sure not to get electrical parts wet.If this does not fix your problem then you can check the hoses by removing them and see if they are separated if not then the next issue is the water pump or head gasket, the head gasket would be checked by using a gas sniffer at a garage to see if hydrocarbons are coming from the radiator, if not then your best bet is the water pump I hope this helps.

Posted on Jun 05, 2010

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2007 Mitsubishi, Outlander XLS....when I start in the morning in cold weather, I am not getting hot air during standby and when I start moving, I am getting hot air after few minutes drive. Then when I...


Check your coolant level when engine cold, low level coolant does not circulate very well at idle and will cause poor heating,at higher RPM water pump turns faster to help circulate.
press the helpful button,

Jan 29, 2016 | 2007 Mitsubishi Outlander XLS

Tip

Tips for operating Air conditioning system on Toyota Hilux and someother...


To cool off your Toyota after it has been parked in the hot sun, drive with the windows open for a few minutes. This vents the hot air, allowing the air conditioning to cool the interior more quickly.

Make sure the air intake grilles in front of the windshield are not blocked (by leaves or snow, for example).

On humid, do not blow cold air on the windshield. The windshield could fog up because of the difference in air temperature on the inside and outside of the windshield.

Keep the area under the front seats clear to allow air to circulate throughout the vehicle.

On cold days, set the fan speed to high for a minute to help clear the intake ducts of snow or moisture. This can reduce the amount of fogging on the windows.

When driving on dusty roads, close all windows. If dust thrown up b the vehicle is still drawn into the vehicle after closing the windows, it is recommended that the in intake be set to FRESH and the fan speed to any setting except "OFF".

If following another vehicle on a dusty road, or driving in windy and dusty conditions, it is recommended that the air intake be temporarily set to RECIRCULATE, which will close off the outside passage and prevent outside air and dust from entering the vehicle interior.

HEATING

For best results, set controls to;
Fan speed ---- Any setting except "OFF"
Temperature----Towards WARM (red zone)
Air intake ---- FRESH (outside air)
Air flow ---- FLOOR
Air conditioning ---- OFF

For quick heating, select recirculated air for a few minutes. To keep the windows from fogging, select fresh after the vehicle has been warmed.

Press the "A/C" button on for dehumidified heating.

Choose floor/windshield air flow to heat the voltage interior while defrosting or defogging the windshield.

AIR CONDITIONING

For best results, set controls to;

Fan speed --- Any setting except 'OFF"
Temperature --- Towards COLD (blue zone)
Air intake --- (outside air)
Air flow --- PANEL
Air conditioning --- ON

For quick cooling, move the air intake selector to recirculate for a few minutes.

VENTILATION

For best results, set controls to;

Fan speed --- Any setting except 'OFF"
Temperature --- Towards COLD (blue zone)
Air intake --- (outside air)
Air flow --- PANEL
Air conditioning --- ON

DEFOGGING

The inside of the windshield

For best results, set controls to:

Fan speed --- Any setting except 'OFF"
Temperature --- Towards WARM (red zone) to heat; COLD (blue zone) to cool
Air intake --- FRESH (outside air)
Air flow --- WINDSHIELD
Air conditioning --- ON

The outside of the windshield

For best results, set controls to:

Fan speed --- Any setting except 'OFF"
Temperature --- Towards WARM (red zone)
Air intake --- FRESH (outside air)
Air flow --- WINDSHIELD
Air conditioning --- OFF

On humid days, do not blow cold air on the windshield. The windshield could fog up because of the difference in air temperature on the inside and outside of the windshield.

DEFROSTING

The outside of the windshield

For best results, set controls to:

Fan speed --- Any setting except 'OFF"
Temperature --- Towards WARM (red zone)
Air intake --- FRESH (outside air)
Air flow --- WINDSHIELD
Air conditioning --- OFF

To heat the vehicle interior while defrosting the windshield, choose floor/windshield air flow.

on Feb 14, 2011 | Toyota Pickup Cars & Trucks

Tip

How to Help Prevent an Automobile Overheat in a Traffic Jam


(This tip is not for any specific make or model. A "General" catagory was not available.)

If you keep your auto’s maintenance schedule up to date, then chances are you’ll never have any engine trouble. And while that may be a good thing, it doesn’t give you much experience with knowing what to do when things do start to go haywire.

Take for instance a day when you’re either driving to work or driving home from work. And it’s been a tough year, so you haven’t been paying much attention to your auto, and the radiator fluid level is running dangerously low. So, you’re on the road, it’s 100 degrees outside, your AC is doing it’s job but unfortunately some drivers aren’t doing their jobs at paying attention behind the wheel and the inevitable accident happens followed by an undetermined amount of time you’ll be stuck right where you are.

Although you know you shouldn’t run your AC in those conditions, but it’s just too hot. Eventually, the radiator will overheat and start blowing hot steam out from under your hood. What should you do?

First, you really should have turned off that AC, but you didn’t, did you? Hopefully, you were able to notice something was wrong by the smell of burning rubber and radiator fluid seeping into the cab from under the dash. Then you could have prevented a full overheat. Contrary to what you might think, pulling over to the side of the road is not your only option and you may not be able to. Besides, if you did pull over, it would take quite some time for a 400-degree radiator to cool to a comfortable 100 degrees.

The best course of action would be to shut off the AC whether you like it or not. Otherwise you will be standing outside on hot pavement soon. Open all the windows and turn your heater on it’s hottest setting, and the fans as high as possible and aim them toward the open windows.

Sounds crazy doesn’t it, but consider in the winter time when you use your auto’s heater. Where do you suppose the heat comes from? That’s right--something overheating under the hood. That something is usually radiator fluid running from the radiator through all parts of the engine not unlike your body’s circulatory system. But instead of carrying oxygen to all parts of the body, the cool radiator fluid is pumped from the radiator (i.e. reservoir) through the channels in the engine block absorbing heat from the engine, and boils on it’s return trip to the radiator where it will be forced through much smaller, thinner, channels to release the heat. As the fluid passes through the radiator, the radiator fan blows outside ambient air across the channels and it absorbs the heat from the radiator fluid boiling inside.

The air also blows across the engine to help cool it a little, and even though the air is hot, it’s still much cooler than the engine itself. That hot air warms you in the winter, and is your ticket home today. Keep it moving over the engine. Keep the fan blowing by keeping the heat on high. You will see an almost instant improvement by the engine’s temperature gauge slowly dropping. Power off all unnecessary electrical devices because they put a burden on the engine. Stay a good distance from the hot exhaust emitting from the car ahead of you, and drive to the nearest service station.

Some of you might wonder why not just pull over and phone AAA. Well, frankly they can be a big help, but they have to get to you, through the traffic cluster while you stand on the highway watching tomorrow’s ride to work have a total melt-down. By the time anyone gets to you, the damage will have been done.
I hope this helps someone in some small way.
Randy

on Feb 28, 2010 | Smart fortwo Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2002 mercury cougar overheats at idle and when drove faster ik head gasket isnt blown, thermostat , water pump, relay, its been flushed out till clean idk whats wrong at all.


I suspect that if you do not have electric fan/s then the fan clutch or viscous fan hub has failed
indications are over heating at idle , stop lights , slow traffic, high rpms at slow speed but cools down as soon as there is enough road speed to put air through the radiator.

Sep 02, 2015 | Mercury Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

87 pathfinder overheating replaced thermostat hoses are good resevoir has cracks in it though could this cause over heat ?


possible --if there is a pressure cap on it --if not then n you haven't mentioned when it over heats so here are a few answers
if it over heats all the time regardless have a compression test done--- have a flow test done on the radiator --check the radiator cap
if it over heats at lights ,in slow traffic or when the vehicle is goin slow with high rpms ( hilly work) but cools down when a road speed is achieved then replace the viscous fan hub or check operation of the electric fans
If the engine over heats but the temp gauge reads normal then bleed the air lock out of the cooling system
if it over heats at high speed then check the core fins are no falling off or there is nothing in front of the radiator preventing air flow,or check hat it is engaging overdrive,

May 29, 2015 | 1987 Nissan Pathfinder

1 Answer

Temp gauge is rising at 3/4 of the way even while traveling down the interstate, once a/c was turned off it started to go back down but would still go up if sitting still running, what would cause this?


change the antifreeze and flush your system, its been hot lately so the motor heat goes up too, having the AC on makes the motor work harder, so thats normal that the temp would rise when its on. traveling on the road allows air to help cool the motor, sitting in traffic slows the air, so there again heat will increase

Jul 04, 2011 | 1996 Honda Accord

1 Answer

When idling my jeep overheats. The cooling fan is running and it speeds up when temperature goes up. The temperature gets close to 260 degrees and the engine tries to stall. when I start moving it cools...


At idling speed an engine does build up a lot of heat and the cooling fan will kick in. In slow moving traffic or traffic jams the temperature gauge can touch the red - particularly on hot days. The reason it cools down when you start moving is because of the air flow through the radiator.

Presumably there are no leaks from the cooling system otherwise you would have mentioned it. In normal circumstances the fan will not be running as you are driving at speed, as the air-flow through the radiator is sufficient to cool things. The fan only kicks in to get rid of excess heat - and this usually occurs at idling speed or after you have parked the car.

If the fan is running all the time as you drive, this points to either a fault in the fan switch, or the car is running too hot. presumably in normal driving the fan isn't running and the temperature gauge reads normal?

It is common - in stationary traffic many cars overheat (particularly big engined models) try to stall and 'cut out'. Restarting can be difficult until the engine cools down.

Is your car overheating in normal driving conditions or just at idle speed? Overheating in normal driving conditions can be caused by things like a failing water pump, blocked radiator, collapsed hose, faulty thermostat or, in the worst case scenario, cylinder head problems.

Overheating at idling speed is 'common'. Check your coolant level. If your car isn't using/losing coolant then there probably is no major problem. You can flush out the cooling system and refill with new coolant - and also check your radiator. Are the cooling fins crumbling with age? Or maybe they're partly clogged with insects and debris from the road? A blast with a hosepipe wil sort that out ..

The question is how much does your car overheat in normal driving? If it doesn't .. it appears as though you have nothing to worry about as such. Most cars have 2 speed fans... the 2nd faster stage kicks in at some point dependant on engine temperature. Perfectly normal.

Aug 14, 2010 | 2003 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

When I switch on air conditioning or heating the engine strats to work irregularly and especially when I stay waiting at trafic lights in traffic jams in the city when it is hot.


Most likely the idle air control valve is faulty. But that's just a guess. Does it do the same thing when you turn the steering wheel at a stop. The IAC is suppose to open a little when a load is placed on the engine in order to add more fuel so the air/ fuel ratio stays efficient

Jul 17, 2009 | 2004 Chrysler PT Cruiser

1 Answer

Over heating and heater takes a long time to heat up


change the thermatstat it has aweak spring in it .could fail all together and over heat

Mar 03, 2009 | 2001 Dodge Durango

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