Question about 2001 Buick Park Avenue

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Hub making grinding noise tie rods need replacement

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Hub grinding noise sounds like bad wheel bearing or sticking brake caliper. A bad wheel bearing will be felt through the steering wheel and the brake pedal. a sticking caliper won't vibrate, but generate heat.
But tie rod ends get loose and cause vibration through the steering wheel on bumps, but not through brake pedal.

Posted on Jun 01, 2010

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A grinding from the hub sounds like a bad wheel bearing.

Posted on Jun 01, 2010

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1. Test drive the car. Start with the windows down. Find a parking lot or somewhere relatively quiet so the noises can be heard. Drive straight at 20 miles per hour and lightly apply the brakes. Listen for squealing, rubbing or grinding; this would indicate worn brake pads. Slow the car to 10 miles per hour and make a sharp turn in both directions. If you hear a clicking noise, the CV joints are bad and need to be replaced. If you hear a grinding noise when driving straight ahead slowly, the hub bearings are bad. Come to a stop and turn the wheel in both directions. If a grinding noise is present, the top bearing plate is suspect and must be checked further. Put the car in park and get out. Push up and down on the front end of the car. If a squealing noise is present, the struts or control arm bushings are bad and need further inspection. Take the car home to continue the inspection.

2 Raise the front of the car with the floor jack and position the jack stands under the frame. Let the car down on the jack stands.

3 Grasp the tire on both sides and attempt to wobble it left and right; if there is any movement with no corresponding movement in the steering wheel, one or both tie rod ends are loose and need to be replaced. Have a helper wobble the tire while you slide under the car and observe the inner and outer tie rods ends. This is the link from the rack and pinion steering to the steering knuckle. Place a hand on the outer tie rod end as the tire is being moved; if you can feel freeplay, the outer joint needs to be replaced. Place a hand on the inner tie rod shaft; if you can feel it moving in and out with the movement of the tire, the inner tie rod is faulty.

4 Look at the tire for uneven wear indicating an alignment problem. Spin the tire slowly and look for flat spots, humps in the tread or wire protruding from the tread indicating a separated tire.

5 Grab the tire at the top and bottom and shake the tire in and out; if you can feel any freeplay, the hub bearing is bad and needs replacement.

6 Place the pry bar under the tire. Lift up and release several times; if the tire can be lifted with very little pressure the lower ball joint is bad and needs replacing.

7 Remove the tire/wheel assembly. Place your hand on the coil spring on the strut and have a helper turn the steering wheel to the left and right; if you can feel any grinding, the top bearing cap on top of the strut is defective and needs to be replaced.

8 Inspect the strut for leakage around the seals. Replace if they are leaking.

9 Inspect the brake pads and rotors for wear and replace as necessary.

10 Inspect the sway bar front bushing where it is mounted under the radiator and make sure it is in place. Inspect the sway bar links on the ends of the sway bar where they connect to the lower control arm. They consist of a long bolt with a series of rubber bushings held on to the lower control arm by a nut. Replace these if they are loose or have any worn parts. They are a major noise problem

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If you still think the noise is coming from the left side CV joint it would be more advisable to replace the entire axle as an assembly. For the time and effort it takes, you can usually get a rebuilt axle assembly for only a few dollars more than the CV joint and the boot required to repair one. You will need a large axle nut socket (usually 30 - 32mm) to remove the axle nut. The lower ball joint and tie rod will need to be separated along with the brake caliper and rotor, from the spindle. I would recheck the grinding noise before doing it. A lot of wheel bearings are mistakenly diagnosed to the wrong side. If the noise is loudest when turning left, most people would assume the left side wheel bearing is at fault. However if the noise is loudest turning left it indicates the right side wheel bearing is most likely at fault. Due to the weight distribution of the front end, turning left the weight all transfers to the right side, loading that bearing. Make sure thats not the case before tackling an axle.

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98 Nissan Altima Grinding Noise? My mother in law has a 98 nissan altima with an automatic. She recently had the rotors turned and a tie rod end replaced at a local shop. A couple days after the work was...


Hello i would check your wheel bearings or sometimes called bearing hub .Jack car up prop the car with axle stands now remove your tires and rotors once removed wiggle you bearing hub left to the right your bearing hub should have minimal play one side to the other is obvious the looser play hub will be your noise you have been experiencing.most people call this road noise.

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My Pontiac Bonneville has a popping noise when i hit a bump i think its the tie rod ends i don't know if its inner or outer. How can i tell what the problem is and how hard it is to fix.


does it kinda sound like two peices of metal striking each other? most likely the outer tie rod end. the inner tie rod end wouldnt make a sound anything like that, it would snap and you wouldnt be able to steer the car very well.....regardless, this is easy to check. remove the wheel. the object directly behind your brakes is the wheel hub, directly behind the wheel hub is the steering knuckle. connected to the steering knuckle you should find the strut up top, a control arm on the bottom, the sway bar attaches towards the front of the car, the outer tie rod end connects to the hub on the side closest to the rear of the car. connected to the outer tie rod end is the tie rod, which is then connected to your power steering rack and pinion via the inner tie rod ends. you want to locate the outer tie rod end and examine it visually. is the rubber cracked, torn, or missing? if so, replace the outer tie rod end. you will need a 2 jaw puller to remove the old tie rod end, but removal and installation is EASY (i taught my wife how to do it in 5 minutes and she did it successfully in less than 10). depending on how far the jam nut is moved when replacing the tie rod, you may need an alignment after replacing it. if the rubber on the tie rod end looks fine, the noise is probably coming from the strut. when the struts are worn out, the strain of the vehicle bouncing is put on the coil over springs. after a while, the spring can become worn out as well.....this would create a "clunking" sound when going over bumps.....and, if the spring wears out too much, you MIGHT be able to hear a metalic popping sound when the struts reach the damper if the spring hasnt expanded that far yet (this is extremely unlikely tho, more likely than not, the spring would crack/break LONG before you hear this noise and the car would be close to undriveable......). regardless, out tie rod ends are roughly 12-15 bucks each and extremely easy to install. you might be able to find a parts store willing to loan you a 2 jaw puller, but if not they generally run 30-35 dollars....DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS REPAIR IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A REPAIR MANUAL THE LISTS THE CORRECT TORQUE SETTING FOR THE TIE ROD ENDS. if the bolt isnt torqued propperly, a) your alignment will be off and b) you run the risk of snapping the new tie rod end.

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2 Answers

Tie rod problem 98 Dodge


There is a tool that you can use that will make it easier for you. To get to the tie rod end, remove the wheel and take the outer tie rod end loose from the hub. You will have to use a hammer and hit the socket where the end goes into the hub to free it up. Once you have the tie rod loose from the hub, loosen the nut behind the outer tie rod end. Count the revolutions as you unscrew the outer end off and write te number down so you will know how far to put it back on. This will save your alignment. Now, the end that is still there is your inner tie rod end. You will have to undo the bellows boot to get to the nut. The tool will slide over the end and secure onto the nut. Now you just unscrew this and replace with you new inner tie rod end.
Please remember to rate this fix.

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