Question about 1993 Toyota Camry V6

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My camry 1993 engine is heating up while idling or in traffic also when ac is on. drives well on high speed without overheating

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  • Master
  • 3,740 Answers

You have a radiator fan motor that is not running either due to a thermostatically controlled temp switch,(Located on the back of the radiator) a failed fan relay (in the engine compartment fuse /relay box) or a bad fan motor.
You can troubleshoot by checking for 12V DC to chassis ground at the fan motor temp switch. If you have power in you can jumper with a wire the switch wires and see if the fan runs. If it does not run then you need to check the fan relay and motor.

To test the fan you can run a wire from the battery to the fan and another wire to chassis ground to see if the fan runs. If after directly connecting 12V DC to the fan motor and it does not run the fan has failed.

As far as the you either replace it with another one or... have to figure out which 2 wires control the fan motor and jumper them out to see if the fan runs.

Kelly

Posted on Jun 01, 2010

Testimonial: "Excellent work, appreciate the information provided very informative and useful for rectifying my problems."

  • 8 more comments 
  • iqbal hemani Jun 02, 2010

    Thanks Kelly for quick help. What ever you said is true for electric fan motor, unfortunately this is not electric, I think this camry comes with hydralic motor, have no idea how to check. As I mentioned there is no power, I can say this because the fan just stops by a news paper. Coolant level is ok and while driving at 40 there is no problem at all. Appreciate if anyone can help with this kind of motor.
    iq

  • Kelly
    Kelly Jun 02, 2010

    Hi again. What your saying is that you have a fluid clutch / belt driven fan. If that is the case and it really does seem odd that Toyota suddenly went from electric fans to belt driven fans in 1993.. but... in any case here goes on the fan clutch. On the radiator end of the fan clutch there is a thermostaticaly controlled drive that is actuated when the temp is above roughly 135 degrees. To test these clutches you can pour very hot water over the clutch head of the fan or you can use a blow dryer connected to a very heavy duty extension wire and just heat up the fan clutch head. I find that a pan of very hot water works much faster. What you do is pour the HOT water over the head then grip a fan blade and it should pretty much lock up when HOT. If it does not lock up the fan clutch is bad and it will have to be replaced.
    Car problems are never any fun but this should tell you if your fan clutch is working correctly or not.
    If by chance it is locking up as it should then you will need to look at things like the engine thermostat located under the intake manifold fitting that connects from the top radiator hose.

    Thanks again for using FixYa.

    Kelly

  • Kelly
    Kelly Jun 03, 2010

    I just looked up all of the fans applicable to a a 1993 Camry 3.0 again and there is not a single hydraulic OEM fan in the aftermarket for this car. I am really trying to help but everything I see in the books is electric fans with the exception of the one below. Does your fan look like this fan? (Camry fan same as Lexus)



    http://www.partstrain.com/store/includes...=



    (Gasp $421.00)



    If this fan is turning slowly there is no quick fix other than replacement.

  • iqbal hemani Jun 04, 2010

    Appreciate your efforts for helping me.
    No this motor does not look like this , it seems be electrical, mine is hydraulic, I can see two pipe connection for oil in and out. Some one told me it works with the same pump of power steering. Since my power steering works fine, I suspect only motor (may be impleller inside is dirty or clogged which is restricting the flow). I hope you got the idea of motor I have.

  • Kelly
    Kelly Jun 04, 2010

    After a few more hours of digging I have found that the speed of the cooling fan is controlled by the solenoid switch that is connected to the top of the power steering pump which in turn is controlled by the cooling fan ECU, this may be where the problem is, although most of the time the reason the fan does not turn fast enough is because the "solenoid on the power steering pump is disconnected" which will make the fan run at low speed by default. This is the symtom your describing.... FAN MOTOR RUNS SLOW.
    I really don't think you have a radiator problem or a thermostat problem as it cools normally at highway speed.
    I have also read that the fan is supposed to kick into high speed IF you turn on the AC. Does your fan do this? Since your fan turns but does not run at high speed then your most likely looking at either the "fan solenoid" on the power steering pump or the "fan ECU" as the problem. The link I sent last post is for your hydraulic fan motor replacement. I am NOT recommending hydraulic fan motor replacement.

    Thanks and hope this is informative.

    Kelly

  • Kelly
    Kelly Jun 04, 2010

    After a few more hours of digging I have found that the speed of the cooling fan is controlled by the solenoid switch that is connected to the top of the power steering pump which in turn is controlled by the cooling fan ECU, this may be where the problem is, although most of the time the reason the fan does not turn fast enough is because the "solenoid on the power steering pump is disconnected" which will make the fan run at low speed by default. This is the symtom your describing.... FAN MOTOR RUNS SLOW.
    I really don't think you have a radiator problem or a thermostat problem as it cools normally at highway speed.
    I have also read that the fan is supposed to kick into high speed IF you turn on the AC. Does your fan do this? Since your fan turns but does not run at high speed then your most likely looking at either the "fan solenoid" on the power steering pump or the "fan ECU" as the problem. The link I sent last post is for your hydraulic fan motor replacement. I am NOT recommending hydraulic fan motor replacement.

    Thanks and hope this is informative.

    Kelly

  • Kelly
    Kelly Jun 04, 2010

    After a few more hours of digging I have found that the speed of the cooling fan is controlled by the solenoid switch that is connected to the top of the power steering pump which in turn is controlled by the cooling fan ECU, this may be where the problem is, although most of the time the reason the fan does not turn fast enough is because the "solenoid on the power steering pump is disconnected" which will make the fan run at low speed by default. This is the symtom your describing.... FAN MOTOR RUNS SLOW.
    I really don't think you have a radiator problem or a thermostat problem as it cools normally at highway speed.
    I have also read that the fan is supposed to kick into high speed IF you turn on the AC. Does your fan do this? Since your fan turns but does not run at high speed then your most likely looking at either the "fan solenoid" on the power steering pump or the "fan ECU" as the problem. The link I sent last post is for your hydraulic fan motor replacement. I am NOT recommending hydraulic fan motor replacement.

    Thanks and hope this is informative.

    Kelly

  • Kelly
    Kelly Jun 04, 2010

    After a few more hours of digging I have found that the speed of the cooling fan is controlled by the solenoid switch that is connected to the top of the power steering pump which in turn is controlled by the cooling fan ECU, this may be where the problem is, although most of the time the reason the fan does not turn fast enough is because the "solenoid on the power steering pump is disconnected" which will make the fan run at low speed by default. This is the symtom your describing.... FAN MOTOR RUNS SLOW.
    I really don't think you have a radiator problem or a thermostat problem as it cools normally at highway speed.
    I have also read that the fan is supposed to kick into high speed IF you turn on the AC. Does your fan do this? Since your fan turns but does not run at high speed then your most likely looking at either the "fan solenoid" on the power steering pump or the "fan ECU" as the problem. The link I sent last post is for your hydraulic fan motor replacement. I am NOT recommending hydraulic fan motor replacement.

    Thanks and hope this is informative.

    Kelly

  • Kelly
    Kelly Jun 04, 2010

    After a few more hours of digging I have found that the speed of the cooling fan is controlled by the solenoid switch that is connected to the top of the power steering pump which in turn is controlled by the cooling fan ECU, this may be where the problem is, although most of the time the reason the fan does not turn fast enough is because the "solenoid on the power steering pump is disconnected" which will make the fan run at low speed by default. This is the symtom your describing.... FAN MOTOR RUNS SLOW.
    I really don't think you have a radiator problem or a thermostat problem as it cools normally at highway speed.
    I have also read that the fan is supposed to kick into high speed IF you turn on the AC. Does your fan do this? Since your fan turns but does not run at high speed then your most likely looking at either the "fan solenoid" on the power steering pump or the "fan ECU" as the problem. The link I sent last post is for your hydraulic fan motor replacement. I am NOT recommending hydraulic fan motor replacement.

    Thanks and hope this is informative.

    Kelly

  • Kelly
    Kelly Jun 04, 2010

    Apologize for multiple posts. I kept getting oops try again. Appears to be a site error. Kelly

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  • Master
  • 973 Answers

Check your electric cooling fans to make sure that they are turning on when when they are supposed to.

Posted on Jun 01, 2010

  • iqbal hemani Jun 02, 2010

    This is not a electric fan nor a belt driven, I think it is hydraulic as I can see two fluid connection on the back of the fan.

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