Question about 1997 Ford Taurus

2 Answers

97 Ford Taurus with wiring problem

I have a 97 Ford Taurus with 160K miles. I have had an apparent wiring harness problem for the last 100K miles. Several related problems are present which I have lived with they include;

1. Intermittent drivers door open light "on" on dash along with;
2. Drivers door lock pops up if pushing door lock electric button on door console with;
3. Dome light on as if door is open however;
4. If door lock is manually pushed down electronics does not sense it and will not pop the lock back up so door stays locked while driving.
5. The car thinking the door is open also occurs when the car is turned off and parked and all the doors are closed firmly, the dome light stays on for an extended period. A circuit eventually overrides it and turns it off before it runs the battery down. The above problem is an intermittent and erratic one occurring about 1/2 of the times I drive the car.
I have taken the door apart to check the closing mechanism, can't find anything wrong with it. Or the wires.
6. In addition to the above, other electronic problems seem to be occurring in association with it. The service engine light comes on intermittently then goes back off on its own. The engine sometimes idles at 2000 rpm indicating probably something with EGR circuitry and now the drivers power seat stopped working. All motors have stopped at the same time indicating most probably a loss of power to the seat itself through the wiring harness. I checked the fuses, all fine.

I believe all these problems have a common denominator, probably shorts in the wiring harness somewhere perhaps caused by a wire overheating and melting the insulation off several adjacent wires. Someone did tell me a few years ago that the 97 Ford Taurus had a wiring problem along this line with melting wires and erratic electrical problems. I know a lot of power goes to the electric fans, I checked and these big fat wires do dive into the wiring harness in the front of the engine compartment. I looked a little in the wiring harness in this area and it seemed to be fine.

Has anybody heard of this? If this is a problem that some 97 Tauruses had what part of the wiring harness was the culprit? Where do I look?

Other than this the car has been great and I believe it has many miles of life left in it.

JD

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2 Answers

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  • Ford Master
  • 3,433 Answers

The fans are relay controlled, likely problem. Most current demanding componants have relays because a switch circuit would burn out. All your issures are very possibly relay issues. Find the relay bank and chk yhem for overheating, burn out, or plain ole malfunction. Good Luck, -Ned-

Posted on Jun 01, 2010

  • 19 more comments 
  • jeffereydavi Jun 02, 2010

    Some relays are in the fuse box with the fuses, all the fuses and the relays look externally OK. Is there a way to test them? Do you know if there are more relays located elsewhere than the fuse box in the front of the engine compartment?

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

  • Ned C Cook
    Ned C Cook Jun 03, 2010

    Yes, the relay can be tested. Keep in mind that RELAY IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MEANS TO ENGAGE A HEAVIER CIRCUIT. Depending on the number of contacts in the relay, the can be multiple controlled circirts or jus one. Automotive relays usually have a schematic that shows which terminals are related. Using a multimeter set on ohs you can tell what circuits are open and which are closed.Relays can be mounted and/or found on the fuse panel, under the hood in a covered box or mounted openly on the firewall. I am not sure if it was mentioned, but, Heavy circuits are usually confined to the engine compsrtment.Due to the larger wires involved with with the secoondary circuit.. When you locate a relelay, removing it will kill that circuit and the componant that circuit controls will stop functioning. Pull/remove the relay and look at the femaleof the connection. This is where you will see signs of overheating.The connector will disclose melting of the holding connector. The area around the relay spade can also show signs of a problem in the same manner. If you discover any melted connectoe, Replace the relay and the connectoe if the quality of contact is questionable. Take the bad one apart,remove the cover, and you will see how the two circuits interact, giving you a good understanding of how to test them. Good luck and feel free to keep in touch should you have the need. -Ned-

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My question is: Can wiring a different radio/additional speakers lead to the following problem? When key is out of the ignition the wipers, door locks and door open beeper works. Also if the car is not driven for more than 8 or so hours something drains the battery. bought a brand new battery not the problem there. Is very frustrating.

Posted on Aug 02, 2012

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Jun 09, 2010 | 2003 Ford Taurus

2 Answers

Three cars in my house leak antifreeze, all three around 100k miles. car1.leaks slowly, warms a little 98 lumina. Dad say water pump. car2. leaks alot, warms really nice 99 lumina. car3. leaks alot, been...


SOUND LIKE RADIATOR HOSES AND RADIATOR.ONLY WAY TO CHECK IS FILL UP RADIATOR WITH COOLANT.CRANK UP CAR UNTIL WARMS UP.LET RADIATOR PRESSURE BUILD UP.THEN TURN OFF CAR.LOOK FOR WATER LEAKS AT RADIATOR HOSES AND AROUND THE RADIATOR.

Jan 07, 2010 | 1997 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

I have a 2000 ford taurus that engine skips or mimisses between 35 mph and 45 mph


Have you changed your spark plugs and wires recently? How many miles since that was last done?

May 05, 2009 | 2000 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

2003 ford taurus transmission problem


The tranny is probably on it's last leg. Changing fluid and filter on a tranny that's never had it done before can be worse on it than good.

Jan 24, 2009 | 2003 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

F4.6 engine missing on no 3 cyclinder


FROM LustyKid:

Clarification request posted by emissionwiz is appropriate to resolve your issue. If you check as he suggested, you shold solve the problem.

The only thing I would add to it, is check the spark plug wire for resistance and ensure is within tolerances. If not, replace the spak plug harness, it wouldn't hurt.....Do you have over 30K miles on those wires???????More??????My wires lasted 100K before I change them for good luck.

Dec 07, 2008 | 2004 Ford F150

2 Answers

How many miles do u get on a 98 ford taurus once the red light go


sounds like the calipers are not releasing . I have had the brake HOSE fracture on the inside and have a flap of rubber fold down creating a one way valve every time you apply the brakes.
180k on it? you must have done the head gasket already then... but so long as you don't do jack rabbit starts , it should last another 100k easy. ( I just gave up on a 96 that had 340k on it ...)

Nov 24, 2008 | 1998 Ford Taurus

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