Question about 2004 Honda Accord

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Auto A/C leak Testing

Can I use regular compressed air rather than nitrogen for leak testing on my automobile air conditioning system? I do plan on running a vacuum for 30 minutes after the leak testing.

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Pulling a vacuum is fine. No need for nitrogen. If vacuum holds for a few minutes after you shut down pump and close it off to system. You should be good to go. BEFORE YOU PUT NEW REFRIGERANT IN DOUBLE CHECK THE SCHRATER VALVES ON THE HIGH AND LOW SIDE PORTS. THEY ARE NOTORIOUS FOR CAUSING LEAKAGE BECAUSE WE WILL NOT HEAR OR SEE THEM LEAK UNTIL AFTER WE REMOVE THE MANIFOLD GAUGES FROM THE SYSTEM

Posted on May 25, 2010

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Using nitro to test the A/C system would be very hazardous. Since freon is a very volatile chemical.

Yes, using compressed air would be much safer.

Many automotive A/C specialists, use compressed air to test A/C systems of all kinds.

Posted on May 25, 2010

  • djk101 Jul 15, 2010

    Nitrogen is INERT and NOT HAZARDOUS at all.

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Chevy impala stalling issues whats the problem


That could be a lot of thing's , stalling when ,cold ,hot ,idling , in gear , coming to a stop etc... Could have a vacuum leak , problem with IAC valve - idle air control , an one of a few different sensors could be bad , mass air flow sensor , coolant temp sensor etc.. You need to have some testing done , scan tool hooked up to check for DTC'S - diagnostic trouble codes , also check engine sensor data parameters . What engine does yours have ? 3.4 or 3.8 L .
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Throttle body tampering, excessive deposits, or damage. Refer to Fuel System Description .


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Monitor the 3X parameter on the scan tool. If the 3X is not responding, inspect the CKP sensor B and circuits for intermittents. Inspect the ignition control (IC) circuit, IC timing control circuit, low resolution engine speed signal circuit and the low reference circuit for intermittents. If these circuits become open, or shorted may not set a DTC immediately, but are capable of causing driveability complaints. Refer to Testing for Intermittent Conditions and Poor Connections in Wiring Systems.


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Feb 22, 2016 | 2003 Chevrolet Impala

3 Answers

Does nitrogen make a difference in tires?


Yes it does and it is important for aircraft tires and tires on higher end race cars but for the average motorist it is complete a waste of money.
It is a means for tire dealers and others to "upsell" customers to a very profitable product that they do not need and will be of very dubious benefit to them. Don't let them con you and here is why if you are interested in reading further.

1. You cannot get pure nitrogen in your car tires unless the tires are completely free of air to begin with and then filled in a vacuum. But they are not. They have air in them when they are filled. Further, unless you test the nitrogen going into your tires from the fill station you have no way of knowing if it is even 100% pure and often it will not be because of quality control issues..

2. Air is about 78% nitrogen in any event. Most of the rest is Oxygen and the remainder other gasses including Co2. Oxygen leaks out through the walls of the tires very slowly over time and what is left is a higher % of nitrogen. Then when you add air to your tires the oxygen in that air will slowly leak out and the cycle continues. So over time, just by adding air to your tires as they slowly lose some pressure, the % nitrogen content will increase as the oxygen will continue to very slowly leak through the fabric of the tire much faster than nitrogen which is very slow.

I saw one independent test which tested the pure nitrogen content of 2 tires, one that had a fresh nitrogen fill and another that had only used air over a couple of years. The tire which had only used air to fill it had a higher nitrogen content. Nitrogen fill = BIG FAIL in that case.

3. If you have paid for a nitrogen fill and you check your tire pressures and find they need topping up are you going to drive around to find a business with nitrogen available or are you going to just top up with air any how? Most people will just add air because they need it now and the gas station is open and convenient.

4. Aircraft and higher end race cars will use nitrogen rather than straight air primarily for one reason:
The pressures in the tires will not increase with heat and decrease when cold. They are stable.
Stable pressures are important for aircraft tires and for race tires(because the handling of the race car can be sensitive at high speeds to small changes in tire pressures. Funnily enough I never used nitrogen in my race car tires and nor did any of my competitors when I was racing. We just did not bother and set our tire pressures knowing how much they would quickly increase after a couple of laps).

But that is not an issue for passenger car tires. You fill them cold at or above the recommended pressure and, when you drive, the tires warm up from friction and the pressure increases by a few pounds which is not a negative issue. When the tires cool, the pressure drops slightly which again is not a problem because you always set your tires pressures cold. When you need to add air you can and you don't have to find a business that can do a nitrogen top up for you.

5. For 15 - 20 dollars you can buy a good tire gauge which you can use to check you tire pressures cold. When you need to add air you can and it is free. Normally I just over pressure the tires by a few pounds at the gas station and adjust them at home with my tire gauge when the tires are cold. It is simple and just check your pressures every 2 weeks or so at home at your leisure with your tire gauge.

Paying a bunch of money for a nitrogen fill and then having to pay again when you need to top them up is ridiculous for a road car. Using Nitrogen is no guarantee against slow leaks in your tires which can occur with a slightly faulty tire valve or a very tiny puncture or a leak under the tire beading where the tire wall contacts the wheel rim. So using Nitrogen does not alleviate the need to regularly check your tire pressures anyhow and to then adjust them when they drop below the recommended pressure or below your preferred higher tire pressure.

6. Finally the proponents of expensive nitrogen tire fills will tell you you need to use nitrogen or your wheels will corrode. They claim that the tiny amount of water vapour in air will cause condensation inside the tire and cause the inner surface of your wheels to corrode. This is complete nonsense. Your car will be dead long before your wheels will corrode from that. Any wheel corrosion that is possible from failure of the layers of paint protection is much more likely from the outside of the wheel which is totally unprotected from the elements, brake dust, scraping the wheels on kerbs and gutters, harsh wheel cleaners etc etc. I am yet to replace a car wheel due to corrosion, let alone corrosion on the inside of the wheel rim protected by the tire. Have you?

Dec 02, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Cylinder 3 misfire code on 2001 Volvo s80. Non turbo. Where is it located? What could it be? And what caused it.


Hello,
Checking fuel injection system, ignition system and components
In the event of diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs), that affect camshaft control or camshaft reset valve, these must be fault-traced first.
The diagnostic trouble code (DTC) indicates which cylinder has misfired: ECM3533

Check that engine oil level is correct.
Check the spark plugs, search for damage in the insulation and other damage.
Check ignition spark.
Check the function of the crankcase ventilation.
Checking fuel and residual pressure. Checking fuel and residual pressures See: Engine, Cooling and Exhaust\Engine\Fuel Pressure\Testing and Inspection\Checking Fuel and Residual Pressures
Check if there is any air leakage. Check for air leaks in the intake system See: Powertrain Management\Fuel Delivery and Air Induction\Testing and Inspection\Air Leaks in the Intake System, Checking
Check that the engine seals tight. Compression test See: Engine, Cooling and Exhaust\Engine\Compression Check\Testing and Inspection\Compression Test
Check flywheel for damage. I have also seen these ECU's fail.
Finally, one thing you can try is called a "hard reset" by disconnecting both battery cables and hold them together for about 3 to 5 minutes, not letting them touch anything else. After this hook them back up and take it for a test drive about 10 miles. The adaptive memory may reset things back to normal. Please advise

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4 Answers

Holden viva 2005 wagon auto electrician said there is no compression in number 4 cylinder and not much in number 1 and maybe the valve could have been damaged? Advice appreciated please.


The valves allow air and gasoline to enter the combustion chamber, to be ignited by the spark plug, and to allow the burned gases to be exhausted from the chamber.

When the valves do not work, a mechanic needs to remove parts of the engine, to see what's wrong, and to make repairs.
It could cost you $500 to $1000 US dollars.

Maybe, time to "junk" the TEN-YEAR-OLD vehicle, and buy another one ???

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1 Answer

What I the specks on compression on a 98 neon


First what is the most important, is to do a
a cylinder leak down test & compare cylinders
Before that, the professionals do a cylinder contribution
test with a scope electrically,that works off starter current
draw,then the leak down & compression is what it is, or you
do that for whatever your thing is,to learn something & keep notes
That checks the valves,rings & such (leak down test)
The actual compression is only a number
& the comparison between cyl is what matters
Specs are hard to come by,so if you have 110lbs
up to 160# just guessing your good to go.
I suggest you use google & you tube video & really
study the automotive theory,problems,testing,repairs
& such.
If you only do compression & it down on a cylinder then what?
You back tracking to find out why
Need to have a game plan & the tools
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tells you things & write it all down on paper

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What is the emission controlls evarorative system


Emission control systems have been incorporated into automobiles to prevent pollution by limiting the amount of partially burned and evaporated gases into the atmosphere. These systems have been efficient in reducing the pollution caused by automobiles to a large extent. Automobiles were first manufactured with exhaust emissions control systems in 1966. Since then technology has undergone several changes that has increased the number of cars which use this technology. The emission released is calculated by quantity released per distance traveled. The types of emissions are tailpipe emissions, life cycle emissions and evaporative fuel emissions.
Catalytic Converter
The catalytic converter was developed in the early 70's when severe air pollution was emanate, but wasn't made mandatory by the US government until 1976. The catalytic converter or "cat" for short is one of your vehicles main emission control devices. The name was derived from the operation the catalytic converter performs, it takes a catalyst and converts the unburned gases to burned gases, "catalytic converter".
EGR Valve
EGR valves are used is to lower KNOX (NO2) gases which occur when the combustion chamber when temperature reaches over 3,500 degrees Fahrenheit. KNOX gases have proven to cause brain damage and have been mandatory on most vehicles since 1976. An EGR (exhaust gas re-circulation) this valve controls exhaust gases to enter the intake manifold and flow into the combustion chamber at certain times in the operation of the vehicle. To test your EGR valve remove the vacuum line that is connected to the valve, apply vacuum using a vacuum pump to the valve while the engine is running. If the engine stalls the EGR system is working, if not, the EGR valve may have failed.
Tailpipe emissions are released as bi-products of spent fuel that is combusted inside the cylinders of the engine. These omitted gases consist of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides. To control tailpipe emissions measures have been taken to increasing engine efficiency. This efficiency involves technologies such as lightweight vehicle design, regenerative braking, decreased rolling resistance, increased ignition voltage, minimizing air resistance and improving power train efficiency.


Lifecycle emissions are products which are released during the manufacturing, maintenance and disposal of the vehicle. The products include volatile solvents such as auto paint and lubricants, manufacturing plant power waste, oil filter and oil changes, heavy metals, tires, landfills, etc. These kinds of emissions are responsible for creating urban smog which consists of heavy molecular gases which pollute our environment.

Temperature change can result in the evaporation of fuel in the tank because of the development of pressure, this is known as gas tank venting. Recently fuel systems have been equipped with a closed system called EVAP, this allows the vapor to be stored in a charcoal canister until it can condense into a liquid and then returned to the fuel tank.

Another emission control system known as the air injection reactor or AIR, oxygen is injected in the exhaust manifold. This system decreases the bi-products of incomplete fuel consumption.


If the emission control system malfunctions the "check engine" light will illuminate. Scan the PCM for trouble codes, repair the problem, then clear codes to re-test system. Most automobile's have an emission system information label under the hood, or consult a repair manual.

The emission system performs regular test while the car is in use called a "test cycle". Tailpipe emission are measured in parts per million or PPM. Presently, the limit for evaporated gases is two grams of HC per hour, which is about one liter per month. At first, the idle test, which was a two-speed test was conducted in the 1980s. Then it was substituted by the dynamometer test in the late 90's, in the accelerated simulated mode or ASM three gases are tested. Various states and countries have developed unique laws about pollution testing of vehicles.

Good luck, and remember rated this help.

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1 Answer

Automobile Temp


first signs of premature head gasket failure need to pull a compression and a water pressure test on the cooling system

Jan 15, 2010 | 2003 Pontiac Bonneville

1 Answer

How do you replace the egr valve in a 1997 chrysler concorde lx


Chrysler Concorde 1993-1997 3.5L MFI 6cyl
Exhaust Gas Recirculation System
Operation

This system reduces the amount of oxides of nitrogen (NO x ) in the exhaust by allowing a predetermined amount of exhaust gases to recirculate and dilute the incoming fuel/air mixture. The diluted air/fuel mixture reduces peak flame temperature during combustion, which in turn inhibits the production of Nitrogen oxides. The principal components of the system are:
- EGR tube (connects a passage in the intake manifold to the exhaust manifold)
- EGR valve
- Electronic EGR Transducer
- Vacuum hoses


Component and System Testing
  1. Check the condition of all of the EGR system hoses and tubes for leaks, hardening or kinks on the rubber hoses. Repair and correct these conditions before proceeding any testing.
  2. Be sure that the hoses at both of the EGR valve and EGR valve control are connected to the proper fittings.
  3. Be sure the electrical connector is firmly attached at the valve control.
  4. To check the EGR system operation, connect the DRB III scan tool or equivalent to the 16-way data link connector. The data link connector is located on the lower edge of the instrument panel near the steering column. Follow the scan tool instructions.
  5. After checking the system with the DRB III scan tool, proceed to the EGR valve leak and control tests, then repair as necessary.

Removal & Installation
EGR Valve and Transducer

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EGR valve and transducer assembly-3.5 engine



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The EGR valve attaches to the back of the cylinder head-3.5L engine


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Loosen, but do not remove, the EGR tube to intake manifold screws

The EGR valve attaches to the rear of the right cylinder head.
  1. Remove the vacuum tube from the electric EGR transducer solenoid. Inspect the vacuum lines for cracking, poor seal due to hardness, or other problems. Replace with new hoses if necessary.
  2. Remove the electrical connector from the solenoid.
  3. Slide the transducer up and out of the mounting bracket.
  4. Loosen, but do not remove, the EGR tube to the intake manifold screws.
  5. Remove the EGR tube lower screws at the valve.
  6. Remove the EGR valve and transducer.
  7. Clean both gasket surfaces and check for any signs of leakage or cracks. Replace the components if any such damage is found or if the valve fails the tests.

To install:
  1. Loosely install the EGR valve and a new gasket onto the cylinder head.
  2. Using a new gasket, attach the EGR tube to the valve and tighten the screws to 95 inch lbs. (11 Nm).
  3. Tighten the EGR tube to the intake manifold plenum screws to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm).
  4. Tighten the EGR valve to the cylinder head screws to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm).
  5. Reconnect the transducer solenoid to the vacuum fitting on the manifold.
  6. Slide the transducer into the bracket.
  7. Reconnect the vacuum lines and electrical wires to the EGR transducer.
continue...

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1 Answer

Fuel air metering p1131code


P1131-Lack of HO2S-21 Switch, Sensor Indicates Lean- Bank 1
A Heated Exhaust Oxygen (HO2S) sensor indicating lean at the end of a test is trying to correct for an over-rich condition. The test fails when the fuel control system no longer detects switching for a calibrated amount of time.
A code P1131 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
Electrical:
  • Short to VPWR in the harness or HO2S
  • Water in the harness connector
  • Open/shorted HO2S circuit
  • Corrosion or poor mating terminals and wiring
  • Damaged HO2S
  • Damaged PCM
Fuel System:
  • Excessive fuel pressure
    Leaking/contaminated fuel injectors
    Leaking fuel pressure regulator
    Low fuel pressure or running out of fuel
    Vapor recovery system
Induction System:
  • Air leaks after the MAF
  • Vacuum Leaks
PCV system:
  • Improperly seated engine oil dipstick
EGR System:
  • Leaking gasket
  • Stuck EGR valve
  • Leaking diaphragm or EVR
Base Engine:
  • Oil overfill
  • Cam Timing
  • Cylinder compression
  • Exhaust leaks before or near the HO2S(s)
Hope this helps, let me know

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