Question about 2002 BMW 7 Series

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Coolant pipe leak on 2002 745Li. Are there any ways to repair this without removing the engine to get to the pipe.

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Posted on Jul 01, 2010

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I have a 95 BMW 740i V8. When ever i srep on the gas to accelerate faster than gently the car blows alot of white smoke until some seconds after the acceleration ends. The smoke is obviously coming from...


White smoke means a coolant leak, check it and repair before to overheating your engine.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Feb 24, 2012 | 1987 BMW 750

1 Answer

Gets hot and low power


1 If engine overheating has occurred the coolant level will naturally be low due to expansion of the coolant from the extreme heat of the engine. This heat expansion forces coolant out of the radiator and coolant reservoir. To test for an engine coolant leak move the car to a dry smooth surface and allow the engine to cool. Remove the radiator cap and carefully (do not spill) add water until full, then re-install cap. Start engine and allow to run for about three to five minutes (do not allow to overheat) while the engine is running inspect the ground below the engine, if an engine coolant leak is present observe the location of the coolant drops, this will help determine where to start looking for the coolant leak (shut the engine off before inspecting). If no coolant is observed two additional checks are needed for a complete test. With the engine off remove the engine oil fill cap and turn it over, if a milky oil condensation is present the engine may have a failed cylinder head or intake manifold gasket allowing coolant to leak internally. To inspect engine gaskets disassembly is required. Next, the car heater core must be inspected; the quickest way to check the heater core condition without removal the heater core is to inspect the passenger's side foot well compartment carpet for the presences of coolant. If coolant is present the heater core has failed and must be replaced or repaired. After necessary repairs have been made refill the cooling system with manufacturers recommended engine coolant and recheck operation.
2 Inspect Engine Cooling Fan Clutch or Electric Fan Operation
3. check water pump

Jun 03, 2011 | Mazda MAZDA6 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

2001 BMW X5 is leaking coolant and the indicator is reading "check coolant level" where might it be leaking from and will this be expensive to repair?


A ten year old European car is due for a new plastic radiator, so that is the most likely suspect if it has never been replaced. If that is it, the part is about $250 if you buy it on line, or $400 if you buy it at the dealer or through a mechanic shop, plus a couple hours labor.
Realistically, however, if you plan on keeping the car for a long time, or if you let your wife or daughter drive it, you should seriously consider going through the whole cooling system and replacing all the plastic and rubber parts. (all hoses, expansion tank and cap, thermostat, thermostat cover, perhaps the fan clutch, etc) If you don't, that cooling system will be back in your wallet every year for the next 5 years, and the sum of all the repairs will be a lot more than the total bill if you do it all at once.
I drive my BMWs for a quarter-million miles or more, so I accept replacing all the plastic and rubber parts in the cooling system every decade or so as a normal maintenance item. I buy all my parts on line and put them on myself, so it is really not all that expensive for me.
Use BMW branded coolant when you put it back together. You can buy that on line cheaper than getting it from the dealer.

Jun 01, 2011 | BMW X5 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

COOLANT LEAK ON RIGHT SIDE OF ENGINE WHERE GASKETS ARE. MECHANIC SAYS IT IS AN 'O' RING.


It could very well be, if the engine is the 3.8L. There is a coolant pipe with a 90o angle, going into the front of the intake manifold. It has an "O" ring at the intake and another at the coolant bypass assembly. Quite often the "O" ring gets hard and leaks, or the plastic coolant pipe deteriorates and breaks inside the intake manifold. Either the coolant bypass / tensioner assembly will need to be removed or the intake manifold will have to be removed to replace the pipe.

Apr 13, 2011 | 1996 Oldsmobile Ninety Eight Regency

1 Answer

I have a 90 chev camaro rs since new, but since then this vehicules has the same problems, "getting hot" and hotter when getting older. I have change every detail at it and even a additional...


Inside your car's engine, thousands of controlled explosions called combustion events occur. These explosions are created by igniting a fuel / air mixture inside the engine. Spark plugs are used to ignite the fuel / air mixture contained in the cylinders. These explosions are converted into power through the engine while producing a large amount of heat. These high temperatures are controlled with the help of the cooling system. A cooling system consists of a water pump, cooling fan, thermostat, radiator hose, hose clamps, radiator, radiator cap and coolant. Engine coolant is used to transfer heat from the engine to the radiator by the cooling system. The radiator removes heat from the coolant by forcing air through the radiator cooling fins. Without coolant your engine will overheat and if left unattended severe engine damage will occur. Engine coolant colors can vary from green, orange, blue, clear and yellow each having their own unique protective and environmental properties. Coolant leaks are a common car problem that can lead to overheating; we have listed some of the most common causes below.(Always inspect engine cold to avoid personal injury) (note: coolant and antifreeze refer to the same product, in below freezing, coolant lowers the freeze point hence the name anti-freeze and in warm weather coolant help raise the boiling point, "coolant").
Troubleshooting Procedure
Step 1: Check Engine Coolant Level, Test For Leaks - Engine coolant is used to transfer heat from the engine to the radiator; if a coolant leak is present the engine will eventually overheat. Inspect the engine coolant level in the coolant reservoir tank; coolant level should be between the hot and cold marks. Always check the coolant level when the engine is cold, preferably over night. If the coolant level is not between the reservoir marks the cooling system may have a leak.

If engine overheating has occurred the coolant level will naturally be low due to expansion of the coolant from the extreme heat of the engine. This heat expansion forces coolant out of the radiator and coolant reservoir. To test for an engine coolant leak move the car to a dry smooth surface and allow the engine to cool. Remove the radiator cap and carefully (do not spill) add water until full, then re-install cap. Start engine and allow to run for about three to five minutes (do not allow to overheat) while the engine is running inspect the ground below the engine, if an engine coolant leak is present observe the location of the coolant drops, this will help determine where to start looking for the coolant leak (shut the engine off before inspecting).

If no coolant is observed two additional checks are needed for a complete test. With the engine off remove the engine oil fill cap and turn it over, if a milky oil condensation is present the engine may have a failed cylinder head or intake manifold gasket allowing coolant to leak internally. To inspect engine gaskets disassembly is required. Next, the car heater core must be inspected; the quickest way to check the heater core condition without removal the heater core is to inspect the passenger's side foot well compartment carpet for the presences of coolant. If coolant is present the heater core has failed and must be replaced or repaired. After necessary repairs have been made refill the cooling system with manufacturers recommended engine coolant and recheck operation.

Nov 24, 2010 | 1990 Chevrolet Camaro

1 Answer

Location of thermostat on 2002 olds alero 2.2


Thermostat Removal & Installation 2.2L Engine To Remove:
  1. Remove the exhaust manifold. If equipped with an automatic transmission.
  2. Drain the cooling system.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following: chevy_cav_02-04_tstat.gif

    • Thermostat housing to water pump feed pipe bolts. chevy_cav_02-04_feedpipe.gif

    • Thermostat housing to water pump feed pipe.
    • Thermostat.
To Install:
  1. Install or connect the following:
    • Thermostat.
    • Thermostat housing to water pump feed pipe.
    • Thermostat housing to water pump feed pipe bolt.
      1. Tighten bolt to 89 in lbs (10 Nm).
    • Exhaust manifold if equipped with an automatic transmission.
  2. Fill the cooling system.
2.4L Engine To Remove:
Thermostat assembly 2.4L 87953024.gif

  1. Drain the cooling system.
  2. Remove the exhaust manifold heat shield.
  3. Remove the coolant inlet housing mounting bolts through the exhaust manifold.
  4. Raise and safely support the vehicle.
  5. Remove the coolant inlet housing stud from the oil pan.
  6. Remove wheel and tire assembly.
  7. Remove the engine splash shield.
  8. Remove the mounting bolts from the transaxle-to-engine block support. Remove the support.
  9. Remove the coolant housing pipe.
  10. Remove the thermostat.
  11. Clean the mating surfaces.
To Install:
  1. Install the thermostat.
  2. Install the coolant housing pipe.
  3. Install and secure the transaxle support-to-engine block mounting bolts.
  4. Install the engine splash shield.
  5. Install the wheel and tire assembly.
  6. Install the coolant inlet housing stud to the oil pan.
    • Tighten to 19 ft lb (26 Nm).
  7. Lower the vehicle.
  8. Install the coolant inlet housing bolts through the exhaust manifold.
    • Tighten the coolant inlet housing bolts to 10 ft lb (14 Nm).
  9. Install the exhaust manifold heat shield.
  10. Fill the cooling system.
  11. Inspect the system for leaks.
3.4L Engine To Remove:
  1. Drain the cooling system.
  2. Remove the air cleaner.
  3. Remove exhaust crossover pipe.
  4. Disconnect the surge tank line fitting from the coolant outlet.
  5. Remove the thermostat housing to intake manifold bolts.
  6. Remove the thermostat housing outlet and thermostat.
To Install:
  1. Install the thermostat and housing outlet.
  2. Install the thermostat housing bolts.
    • Tighten the thermostat housing bolts to 18 ft lb (25 Nm).
  3. Install exhaust crossover pipe.
  4. Connect the surge tank line fitting to the coolant outlet.
    • Tighten the fittings to 15 ft lb (21 Nm).
  5. Install the air cleaner.
  6. Fill the cooling system.
  7. Inspect the system for leaks
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Oct 14, 2010 | Oldsmobile Alero Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Need to add coolant to my bmw 750li. What type and in what ratio should I mix with water?


Hello,


I am writing to tell you about a new BREAKTHROUGH method for repairing a leaking Coolant Transfer Pipe in the BMW N62 V8 engine block using the BimmerFix Stint. The N62 V8 is a popular BMW engine that was used from 2002 thru 2010, in such fabulous vehicles as the BMW 735i, 740i, 745i, 750i & Li, 645Ci, 650i, 540i, 545i, 550i, and the X5 SUV.


Located deep inside of this BMW N62 engine is a Coolant Transfer Pipe, which carries antifreeze from the Water Pump to cooling chambers within the engine. However, the Front Seal on this Cooling Tube can fail in as little as 40,000 miles, and start leaking antifreeze from the engine block, through a weep hole in the Timing Chain Cover. When this happens, the car will lose antifreeze from the engine, and the engine will overheat.


In the past, this has been a very expensive repair because it required disassembly of the engine, in order to access the leaking Cooling Pipe Seal. The original method of replacing the crossover Coolant Transfer Pipe required the removal of the Timing Chain Cover. This repair could cost $6,000 or more at the BMW Dealer.


Then, an after-market Collapsible Coolant Pipe was developed to save time and money on this repair. This Collapsible Coolant Pipe method involves removing the Intake Manifold, cutting out the old Coolant Pipe and installing the after-market Collapsible Coolant Pipe. But even this method required many hours of shop labor and expensive parts and supplies. The repair bill for this method can still cost between $1,500.00 and $2,500.00 to remove the Intake Manifold, cut out the old Coolant Pipe and install the new Collapsible Coolant Pipe.


However, BimmerFix Products Co. has discovered a BREAKTHROUGH system to stop the leak! The BimmerFix method is much faster and less expensive than these old methods. This simple, yet durable and long lasting method inserts the BimmerFix Stint into the leaking crossover cooling tube, through the Timing Chain Cover. The thin aluminum sleeve creates a long lasting repair that is much easier and less expensive to install than the old repair methods.


The new BimmerFix Stint will stop the Coolant Pipe leak, and only requires the removal of the Water Pump. This new patent protected invention can save YOU or your customer's time, hassle, and thousands of dollars. It works or your money back!


Save time and money! Take a look at www.BimmerFix.com.


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BimmerFix Products Co.


Tucson, Arizona, USA

Sep 24, 2010 | 2006 BMW 750Li

3 Answers

Bmw 745i 2003 water leaks out from front of motor and it's not the water pump or any hoses , I changed water pump and gaskets. the water flows out as soon as I fill tank,it's behind the crank pully


I had this same problem in my 02 745i... It's leaking from the internal coolant pipe... a $.05 rubber ring is going to cost you 3-5k easily.

Jan 26, 2010 | 2004 BMW 7 Series

4 Answers

2003 4.4 x5 engine coolant light


@01fordeb: You have to assume the system is dyed before a black light is useful.
Black light dyes are available [cheap] at any parts store.

asker: You may find that the coolant level sensor is defective, covered with gunk or that there is some static electricity built up in the coolant. A mechanic should know how to check for stray current. Also, it may be that a little fluid is going out the overflow because the wrong strength of radiator cap is on there, or the spring is worn out. Replacements are available at any parts store.

HOPE THIS HELPS! Don't forget to rat, please.

Jan 09, 2010 | 2003 BMW 5 Series

3 Answers

1990 Pontiac Grand Am 2.5 L engine. Leaking Coolant from fire wall below blower unit from a rubber elbow below a Air conditioner line. Coolant tank had hard crystalized coolant in it. Washed out...


That drain line is for the box that holds the air conditioner evaporator and the heater coil. It seems that your heater coil has sprung a leak and the leaked fluid is coming out the drain. You have to replace the heater coil, which on most cars involves removing a lot of the interior equipment, including the dash board on many cars. A job best left for the repair shop unless you're very adventurous and patient. Even then you will have to take it to a shop to have the air conditioning system recharged.

Jul 06, 2009 | Pontiac Grand Am Cars & Trucks

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