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My car is leaking coolant my check engine light came on blinked for a very short time and stayed on and smoke is coming from my exhaust pipe and the car shakes bad

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1 Answer

White smoke coming out exhaust and check engine light is blinking 2001 aurau


You have a coolant leak into the engine cylinders. Stop driving and make sure you keep the coolant level topped off until you get this repaired.

Nov 22, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

My car has white smoke coming from the exhaust


he causes of white exhaust smoke can vary; however, it is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke.
One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located.

Nov 17, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

White smoke coming from tail pipe and wont stay ruanning


Failed Head Gasket

Major Repair

Coolant into exhaust-- no matter
what the fix is

Nov 27, 2014 | Mazda MPV Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 1998 Mazda millenia Is shorting white smoke more tell pipe what could be the problem


It is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke. One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located. THESE LEAKS WILL CAUSE SEVERE ENGINE DAMAGE! Have the car inspected immediately.

I
Internal coolant leaks can and will cause

Jul 30, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

What caused white smoke from exhaust?


Generally, white smoke is engine coolant burning. If it only happened for a few seconds, you may have leaked some on the exhaust pipes.
I would check the engine oil and coolant levels with the engine cold, and then look for coolant leaks.

Jun 30, 2013 | 2003 Ford Windstar

3 Answers

I have a 2002 Buick Century and soon after I start it white smoke comes out of the exhuast pipe. I don't believe coolant is getting in to the oil, so I was just wondering if I can keep driving the car...


If the white smoke comes out for 15 to 30 seconds your engine is ok. Condensation does build up inside the engine and as well as the exhaust and will burn out in that amount of time. If the white smoke is continuely extracted from the exhaust pipe you do have coolant leaking through the head gasket

Jul 04, 2010 | 2002 Buick Century

1 Answer

Reset check engin light


White smoke from exhaust indicates burning coolant. Blue smoke from the exhaust indicates burning oil. In replacing the valve cover gasket for an oil leak, some smoke from residual oil is normal but it would be excess oil burning off on the manifold from the engine compartment, not the exhaust. Hope this helps with your question.
Greg

May 14, 2009 | 1999 Volkswagen Passat

1 Answer

Engine stalls, check engine light, not fuel filter.


the white smoke as it stalls could be steam in the exhaust. This is caused by coolant leaking into cylinders from a leaking head gasket. You should check cylinder compression next with a compression tester.

Jan 10, 2009 | 1991 Honda Civic

1 Answer

White smoke exhaust


White smoke is caused by coolant or water coming out the tail pipe. There is a chance that the white smoke was caused by water splashing up from a puddle onto the exhaust pipe. Keep an eye on the coolant level in the radiator in any event. If its less then there leak coolant leak in the car engine which is causing this problem....

Oct 18, 2008 | 1988 Isuzu Impulse

1 Answer

Smoking


Are you loosing coolant? If you are, you may have a leaking head gasket. Coolant will leak into the cylinder and is turned to steam as the engine is running and comes out the exhaust as steam.

Jun 19, 2008 | 2002 Dodge Durango

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