Question about 2003 GMC Yukon Denali

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Is it hard to replace the front transaxle seals?

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Yes because u have to deal with axle and weight of the vehicle

Posted on May 12, 2010

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Transmission problems


Well, the car is 20 years running on the road, one can expect gaskets and seals to start leaking. If you stop the leak and keep it full, you may be alright. But running low fluid for very long will definitely damage the transmission, so do get it fixed, and keep it full but not overfull till fixed. There aren't that many places for an automatic to leak. There are axle seals where the two front axles go into the transaxle. Fairly easy to replace. There is a gasket where the bottom fluid pan bolts to transaxle. Also fairly easy to replace. There are two fluid cooling lines from transaxle to radiator or to a small radiator-like cooler in front of radiator. Leaks can develop in the lines, at the fittings where they connect to transaxle or to the radiator. Leaks anywhere there should be fairly easy to fix. There is another seal, a front transaxle seal, and if bad, fluid will be dripping off the bottom front of the tranny where it mates to the engine. If this seal is bad, the transmission will have to be removed from vehicle to replace it. A $5 seal, but the fix requires pulling the transaxle-ouch! That is about all the places where leaks can develop-except there may be some bolted on or screwed in fittings (like the reverse light switch, for one). These fittings would have seals, O-ring seals, or gaskets that may start leaking.
If it gets low on fluid that fast, it would seem that you should be able to spot where it is leaking. Use rags and wipe off all the old fluid and dirt from the transaxle. After a drive and then parked, you may be able to see where the leak has allowed new fluid to escape. Good luck.

Jul 15, 2013 | 1992 Plymouth Voyager

1 Answer

BAD TRANSMISSUION LEAK


Check the axle shaft seals where the two drive axles enter the transaxle. If leaking there the axle will have to be removed to replace the seal.
Look at the bottom pan of transaxle. If leaking from pan gasket, the pan will have to be removed and transmission drained to replace pan gasket.
There is a transaxle main shaft seal on the front of transaxle, hidden by the bellhousing that mounts to rear of engine.. If the shaft seal is leaking, fluid will be dripping from bottom of bellhousing, and when inspection cover is removed, fluid will be evident inside the bellhousing.
Check also the transmission fluid cooling lines, where the two lines exit the transaxle case, and go to front of car to an external cooler mounted in front of radiator, or going into a separate reservoir in the radiator.

Jan 18, 2013 | 2000 Chrysler Concorde

1 Answer

Cant l get axle seal for rear end standard size doent fix this one small


Check the related help links to troubleshoot the problem:----
4x4 front differential will not engage the axle on ford? http://technoanswers.blogspot.in/2012/02/4x4-front-differential-will-not-engage.html

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How to replace Automatic Transaxle Assembly on Acura Car models? http://repairhelpcenter.blogspot.com/2011/11/how-to-replace-automatic-transaxle.html

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How to replace Manual Transaxle Assembly on Acura Car models? http://repairhelpcenter.blogspot.com/2011/11/how-to-replace-manual-transaxle.html

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CV AXLE stuck in Transmission?


http://technoanswers.blogspot.in/2012/04/cv-axle-stuck-in-transmission.html
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These will help.
Thanks.

Nov 22, 2012 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Need to know how to replaces clutch my 2001 5 speed manual pontiac sunfire car


Unhook positive battery cable, the clutch cable or hydraulic slave cylinder to get the transaxle ready for removal. Secure your car in a safe position. Jack up the front. Stabilize engine with a jack below the oil pan. Remove the transaxle. Separate engine from the transaxle. Push transaxle away from the engine. Disengage the bolts around the pressure plate. Take it and the clutch disc out. Follow instructions for replacing the clutch. Take flywheel and old seal out. Install a new seal. Done! Know how to repair cars by http;//www.obd2express.co.uk

Oct 23, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to change seal in transaxle


I assume you mean the half axle seals. I can give you the main outline, I've not worked on Sorentos
  • Drain the transaxle fluid
  • Raise the front of the car and support it under the chassis and do this for each side:
    • Remove the front wheels
    • Disconnect the brake unit (not the line) from the rotor assembly
    • Remove the screw holding the axle to the rotor assembly
    • Remove the tie rod and lower ball joint to the rotor assembly
  • You should be able to remove the axle tip from the rotor assembly. There usually is a pin holding the axle half to the transaxle. Remove it and pull the axle half out.
  • Remove the seal.
I hope this will help.

Dec 16, 2011 | 2004 Kia Sorento

2 Answers

How hard is it to seal the front seal on the transmission


Front Pump Seal that the Torque Converter goes into?

You have to remove the transaxle to do that

Jul 02, 2011 | 2001 Ford Taurus

2 Answers

How hard is it change front and rear oil seals?


By front and rear oil seals, I am assuming that you are refering to the CRANKSHAFT front and rear oil seals.
The front crankshaft oil seal is under all the components that must be removed to replace the timing belt.
The standard labor time to replace this seal is 4.0 hours for the 4 cylinder and 4.8 hours for the V-6.

The rear crankshaft oil seal requires removal of the transaxle to replace it.
The standard labor time required to do this is 7.3 hours

This is not a job for a novice unless you want to purchace a service manual and spend a lot of time reading the instructions before jumping into it.

Dec 01, 2010 | 1995 Honda Accord

1 Answer

How do you replace the transmission seal?


YOU HAVE TO REMOVE THE FRONT DRIVE AXLES.YOU NEED TO BUY THE SEAL REMOVING TOOL PRY SEAL OUT TRANSAXLE AXLE HOUSING. GO TO ANY AUTO PARTS STORES THEY WILL HAVE ONE.YOU CAN USE A LARGE SOCKET DRIVE TO DRIVE IN THE NEW SEALS BE SURE TO LUBRICATE SEALS WITH TRANSMISSION FLUID.BEST TO BUY REPAIR TO SHOW AND TELL YOU HOW TO REMOVE THE FRONT AXLES.

Aug 24, 2010 | 1999 Oldsmobile Alero

1 Answer

Best way to replace a front transmission seal on a 2001 ford taurus


Remove the transaxle and the torque converter then replace front transmission seal and reassemble transaxle and reinstall in the vehicle

Apr 07, 2010 | 2001 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

Changing trannys


Yep!

Here it is...

Automatic Transaxle Assembly REMOVAL & INSTALLATION
  1. Disconnect the negative terminal from the battery. Detach the wire connector at the Mass Air Flow sensor.
  2. If equipped, remove the cross brace to strut towers, as follows:
    1. Loosen the bar assembly through-bolts.
    2. Remove the inboard strut nuts.
    3. Remove the brace assembly.
    4. Reinstall the inboard strut nuts.
  3. Remove the air intake duct.
  4. Disconnect the cruise control cable from the throttle body.
  5. Remove the shift control linkage from the mounting bracket at the transaxle and the lever at the manual shaft.
  6. Label and detach the connectors from the following:
    1. Park/neutral/backup lamp switch.
    2. Transaxle electrical connector.
    3. Vehicle speed sensor and fuel pipe retainers.
  7. Remove the fuel pipe retainers.
  8. Disconnect the vacuum modulator hose from the modulator. WARNING
    You must support or remove the engine. If the engine is not support you may damage the engine, transaxle, halfshafts or many other components.
  9. Remove the three top transaxle-to-engine block bolts and install a suitable engine support fixture. Load the support fixture by tightening the wingnuts several turns in order to relieve the tension on the frame and the mounts.
  10. Turn the steering wheel to the full left position.
  11. Raise and safely support the vehicle. Remove both front tire and wheel assemblies.
  12. Drain the automatic transaxle fluid into a suitable container.
  13. Remove the right and left front ball joint nuts, then separate both control arms from the steering knuckle.
  14. Remove the right halfshaft from the transaxle only. Do not remove the halfshaft from the hub/bearing assembly. NOTE: Carefully guide the output shaft past the lip seal. Do not allow the halfshaft splines to contact any portion of the lip seal.
  15. Remove the left halfshaft from the transaxle and hub/knuckle assembly. Be careful not to damage the pan.
  16. Support the transaxle with a suitable stand.
  17. Remove the bolts at the transaxle and the nuts at the cradle member. Remove the left front transaxle mount.
  18. Remove the right front mount-to-cradle nuts. Remove the left rear transaxle mount-to-transaxle bolts.
  19. Remove the torque strut bracket from the transaxle.
  20. Remove the right transaxle mount-to-transaxle bolts.
  21. Remove the left rear transaxle mount. Remove the transaxle brace from the engine bracket.
  22. Remove the stabilizer shaft link-to-control arm bolt. NOTE: Be sure to matchmark the flywheel-to-converter relationship for proper alignment upon reassembly.
  23. Unfasten the flywheel cover bolts, then remove the cover. Matchmark the flywheel-to-torque converter installed position, then remove the flywheel-to-converter bolts.
  24. Remove the bolts attaching the rear frame member to the front frame.
  25. Remove the front left cradle-to-body bolt and the front cradle dog leg-to-right cradle member bolts.
  26. Remove the frame/cradle assembly by swinging it aside and supporting it with a jackstand.
  27. Disconnect the oil cooler lines from the transaxle, then plug the lines to avoid contamination.
  28. NOTE: One bolt located between the transaxle and the engine block is installed in the opposite direction.
  29. Remove the remaining lower transaxle-to-engine bolts and lower the transaxle from the vehicle. Be careful when removing the transaxle to avoid damaging the right-hand output shaft, shaft seal, hoses, lines and wiring.

May 12, 2009 | 1995 Pontiac Bonneville

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