Question about 1999 Dodge Caravan

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Tapping noise (worn cam?) from top engine, new lifters were installed ...no difference.

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  • Dodge Master
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Tapping can be loose-worn rocker -flattened cam lobe -bent sticking valve-oil starved-bad push rod

Posted on May 06, 2010

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Does this car take a valve lash adjustment and what are the settings


Your car has hydraulic lifters. Hydraulic lifters just means that it uses engine oil to control the valve clearances using a bucket and shim arrangement.
Here's a generic image of what a hydraulic lifter can look like:25949035-hsh3lir2aljnaf1jzrgt1uh1-5-0.jpg

If the car makes a tapping sound at start up, this points to a problem in the camshaft area - including the hydraulic lifers/shims. Valve clearances are controlled by the lifters and shims. It could also be a worn camshaft - the lobes can become rounded.

Usually, there is no adjustment possible with most hydraulic lifters. Replacement (usually) means you have to remove the camshaft, though I am by no means certain about your particular model.

If you have the tools and ability, remove the rocker cover and have a look at things.

25949035-hsh3lir2aljnaf1jzrgt1uh1-5-1.jpg The image above shows a camshaft - the lobe is worn and rounded. When this happens valve clearance is excessive and may lead to a tapping noise. Engine efficiency is also affected.

The image below shows hydraulic lifters (example only..).
The lifter on the left has a 'dished' surface - wear caused by the camshaft or the lifter not being able to 'turn' in its bore.
25949035-hsh3lir2aljnaf1jzrgt1uh1-5-3.jpg The usual cause of this is (a) short trips where the engine hasn't had a chance to warm up properly and pump oil to the camshaft area (b) poor oil/infrequent oil changes (c) stuck lifter.

Before you spend money on parts or repairs, first try adding some oil flush to the engine to clear out carbon and 'sticky' deposits.


25949035-hsh3lir2aljnaf1jzrgt1uh1-5-10.jpg
... follow the instructions on the bottle...
Then change your engine oil and add something like a 'valve train additive' - this will try and quieten the tapping noise.
The (Ebay) link below will give you an idea of what additives are available (and so will your local car accessory shop).

Try the cheapest and easiest first. If that doesn't work .. unless you are confident that you can inspect, diagnose and replace parts .. give a mobile mechanic a call. Those guys are usually quite good.

12results for camshaft additive

Nov 08, 2015 | 2004 Suzuki Forenza

2 Answers

HO DO I CHECK MY LIFTERS AND VALVES IN A 2008 SCION TC TO SEE WHICH ONE IS MAKING THE TAPPING NOISE?


my suggestion is take it to a pro who will check valve clearances to see which one is loose, than replace or adjust the culprit, its to large of clearance that creates the tap either due to wear or collapsed lifter, not sure but the scion may have an ohv engine and so no lifters and may just need adjustment on the rocker.

Jan 02, 2015 | 2008 Scion Tc

1 Answer

I am hearing a loud quick tapping noise when i accelerate my 2002 x type, any ides? I have already checked the heat shield.


Check this information about "engine noses"...

ENGINE CLICKING NOISES
A clicking or tapping noise that gets louder when you rev the engine is probably "tappet" or upper valvetrain noise caused by one of several things: low oil pressure, excessive valve lash, or worn or damaged parts.

First, check the engine dipstick to see if the oil level is low. If low, add oil to bring it back up to the full mark. Is the engine still noisy? Check your oil pressure. A low gauge reading (or oil warning light) would indicate a serious internal engine problem that is preventing normal oil pressure from reaching the upper valvetrain components. The cause might be a worn or damaged oil pump, a clogged oil pump pickup screen or a plugged up oil filter. Using too thick a viscosity of motor oil during cold weather can also slow down the flow of oil to the upper valvetrain, causing noise and wear.

COLLAPSED LIFTER NOISE
Worn, leaky or dirty lifters can also cause valvetrain noise. If oil delivery is restricted to the lifters (plugged oil galley or low oil pressure), the lifters won't "pump up" to take up the normal slack in the valvetrain. A "collapsed" lifter will then allow excessive valve lash and noise.

VALVE LASH NOISE
If you can rule out lubrication-related problems as a cause, the next step would be to remove the valve cover(s) and check valve lash. On older import engines, mechanical lifters require periodic valve lash adjustments (typically every 30,000 miles). Too much space between the tips of the rocker arms and valve stems can make the valvetrain noisy -- and possibly cause accelerated wear of both parts.

To measure (and adjust) valve lash, you need a feeler gauge. The gauge is slid between the tip of the valve stem and rocker arm (or the cam follower or the cam itself on overhead cam engines) when the piston is at top dead center (valve fully closed). Refer to a manual for the specified lash and adjustment procedure. Also, note whether the lash spec is for a hot or cold engine (this makes a big difference!).

On engines with hydraulic lifters, oil pressure pumps up the lifters when the engine is running to maintain zero lash in the valvetrain. This results in quiet operation. So if the rocker arms are clattering, it tells you something is amiss (bad lifter or worn or damaged parts) or the rocker arms need adjusting.

DAMAGED ENGINE PARTS NOISE
Inspect the valvetrain components. Excessive wear on the ends of the rocker arms, cam followers (overhead cam engines) and/or valve stems can open up the valve lash and cause noise. So too can a bent pushrod or a broken valve spring.

RAPPING OR DEEP KNOCKING ENGINE SOUND
Usually bad news. A deep rapping noise from the engine is usually "rod knock," a condition brought on by extreme bearing wear or damage. If the rod bearings are worn or loose enough to make a dull, hammering noise, you're driving on borrowed time. Sooner or later one of the bearings will fail, and when it does one of two things will happen: the bearing will seize and lock up the engine, or it will attempt to seize and break a rod. Either way your engine will suffer major damage and have to be rebuilt or replaced.

Bearing noise is not unusual in high mileage engines as well as those that have been neglected and have not had the oil and filter changed regularly. It can also be caused by low oil pressure, using too light a viscosity oil, oil breakdown, dirty oil or dirt in the crankcase, excessive blowby from worn rings and/or cylinders (gasoline dilutes and thins the oil), incorrect engine assembly (bearings too loose), loose or broken connecting rod bolts, or abusive driving.

Bearing wear can be checked by dropping the oil pan and inspecting the rod and main bearings. If the bearings are badly worn, damaged or loose, replacing the bearings may buy you some time. But if the bearings are badly worn or damaged, the crankshaft will probably have to be resurfaced - which means a complete engine overhaul or replacing the engine is the vehicle is worth the expense.

ENGINE PINGS OR KNOCKS WHEN ACCELERATING
The cause here may be Spark Knock (Detonation) caused by an inoperative EGR valve, overadvanced ignition timing, engine overheating, carbon buildup in the combustion chambers, or low octane fuel.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Sep 18, 2012 | 2002 Jaguar X-Type

1 Answer

Engine tapping noise


Hi there:
Before to replace some parts, I suggest check this information about "engine noses"...
ENGINE CLICKING NOISES
A clicking or tapping noise that gets louder when you rev the engine is probably "tappet" or upper valvetrain noise caused by one of several things: low oil pressure, excessive valve lash, or worn or damaged parts.

First, check the engine dipstick to see if the oil level is low. If low, add oil to bring it back up to the full mark. Is the engine still noisy? Check your oil pressure. A low gauge reading (or oil warning light) would indicate a serious internal engine problem that is preventing normal oil pressure from reaching the upper valvetrain components. The cause might be a worn or damaged oil pump, a clogged oil pump pickup screen or a plugged up oil filter. Using too thick a viscosity of motor oil during cold weather can also slow down the flow of oil to the upper valvetrain, causing noise and wear.

COLLAPSED LIFTER NOISE
Worn, leaky or dirty lifters can also cause valvetrain noise. If oil delivery is restricted to the lifters (plugged oil galley or low oil pressure), the lifters won't "pump up" to take up the normal slack in the valvetrain. A "collapsed" lifter will then allow excessive valve lash and noise.

VALVE LASH NOISE
If you can rule out lubrication-related problems as a cause, the next step would be to remove the valve cover(s) and check valve lash. On older import engines, mechanical lifters require periodic valve lash adjustments (typically every 30,000 miles). Too much space between the tips of the rocker arms and valve stems can make the valvetrain noisy -- and possibly cause accelerated wear of both parts.

To measure (and adjust) valve lash, you need a feeler gauge. The gauge is slid between the tip of the valve stem and rocker arm (or the cam follower or the cam itself on overhead cam engines) when the piston is at top dead center (valve fully closed). Refer to a manual for the specified lash and adjustment procedure. Also, note whether the lash spec is for a hot or cold engine (this makes a big difference!).

On engines with hydraulic lifters, oil pressure pumps up the lifters when the engine is running to maintain zero lash in the valvetrain. This results in quiet operation. So if the rocker arms are clattering, it tells you something is amiss (bad lifter or worn or damaged parts) or the rocker arms need adjusting.

DAMAGED ENGINE PARTS NOISE
Inspect the valvetrain components. Excessive wear on the ends of the rocker arms, cam followers (overhead cam engines) and/or valve stems can open up the valve lash and cause noise. So too can a bent pushrod or a broken valve spring.

RAPPING OR DEEP KNOCKING ENGINE SOUND
Usually bad news. A deep rapping noise from the engine is usually "rod knock," a condition brought on by extreme bearing wear or damage. If the rod bearings are worn or loose enough to make a dull, hammering noise, you're driving on borrowed time. Sooner or later one of the bearings will fail, and when it does one of two things will happen: the bearing will seize and lock up the engine, or it will attempt to seize and break a rod. Either way your engine will suffer major damage and have to be rebuilt or replaced.

Bearing noise is not unusual in high mileage engines as well as those that have been neglected and have not had the oil and filter changed regularly. It can also be caused by low oil pressure, using too light a viscosity oil, oil breakdown, dirty oil or dirt in the crankcase, excessive blowby from worn rings and/or cylinders (gasoline dilutes and thins the oil), incorrect engine assembly (bearings too loose), loose or broken connecting rod bolts, or abusive driving.

Bearing wear can be checked by dropping the oil pan and inspecting the rod and main bearings. If the bearings are badly worn, damaged or loose, replacing the bearings may buy you some time. But if the bearings are badly worn or damaged, the crankshaft will probably have to be resurfaced - which means a complete engine overhaul or replacing the engine is the vehicle is worth the expense.

ENGINE PINGS OR KNOCKS WHEN ACCELERATING
The cause here may be Spark Knock (Detonation) caused by an inoperative EGR valve, overadvanced ignition timing, engine overheating, carbon buildup in the combustion chambers, or low octane fuel.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jul 17, 2012 | Pontiac Vibe Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Tapping noise on my bmw 318i


Hi there:
First I suggest check this information about "engine noses"...

ENGINE CLICKING NOISES
A clicking or tapping noise that gets louder when you rev the engine is probably "tappet" or upper valvetrain noise caused by one of several things: low oil pressure, excessive valve lash, or worn or damaged parts.

First, check the engine dipstick to see if the oil level is low. If low, add oil to bring it back up to the full mark. Is the engine still noisy? Check your oil pressure. A low gauge reading (or oil warning light) would indicate a serious internal engine problem that is preventing normal oil pressure from reaching the upper valvetrain components. The cause might be a worn or damaged oil pump, a clogged oil pump pickup screen or a plugged up oil filter. Using too thick a viscosity of motor oil during cold weather can also slow down the flow of oil to the upper valvetrain, causing noise and wear.

COLLAPSED LIFTER NOISE
Worn, leaky or dirty lifters can also cause valvetrain noise. If oil delivery is restricted to the lifters (plugged oil galley or low oil pressure), the lifters won't "pump up" to take up the normal slack in the valvetrain. A "collapsed" lifter will then allow excessive valve lash and noise.

VALVE LASH NOISE
If you can rule out lubrication-related problems as a cause, the next step would be to remove the valve cover(s) and check valve lash. On older import engines, mechanical lifters require periodic valve lash adjustments (typically every 30,000 miles). Too much space between the tips of the rocker arms and valve stems can make the valvetrain noisy -- and possibly cause accelerated wear of both parts.

To measure (and adjust) valve lash, you need a feeler gauge. The gauge is slid between the tip of the valve stem and rocker arm (or the cam follower or the cam itself on overhead cam engines) when the piston is at top dead center (valve fully closed). Refer to a manual for the specified lash and adjustment procedure. Also, note whether the lash spec is for a hot or cold engine (this makes a big difference!).

On engines with hydraulic lifters, oil pressure pumps up the lifters when the engine is running to maintain zero lash in the valvetrain. This results in quiet operation. So if the rocker arms are clattering, it tells you something is amiss (bad lifter or worn or damaged parts) or the rocker arms need adjusting.

DAMAGED ENGINE PARTS NOISE
Inspect the valvetrain components. Excessive wear on the ends of the rocker arms, cam followers (overhead cam engines) and/or valve stems can open up the valve lash and cause noise. So too can a bent pushrod or a broken valve spring.

RAPPING OR DEEP KNOCKING ENGINE SOUND
Usually bad news. A deep rapping noise from the engine is usually "rod knock," a condition brought on by extreme bearing wear or damage. If the rod bearings are worn or loose enough to make a dull, hammering noise, you're driving on borrowed time. Sooner or later one of the bearings will fail, and when it does one of two things will happen: the bearing will seize and lock up the engine, or it will attempt to seize and break a rod. Either way your engine will suffer major damage and have to be rebuilt or replaced.

Bearing noise is not unusual in high mileage engines as well as those that have been neglected and have not had the oil and filter changed regularly. It can also be caused by low oil pressure, using too light a viscosity oil, oil breakdown, dirty oil or dirt in the crankcase, excessive blowby from worn rings and/or cylinders (gasoline dilutes and thins the oil), incorrect engine assembly (bearings too loose), loose or broken connecting rod bolts, or abusive driving.

Bearing wear can be checked by dropping the oil pan and inspecting the rod and main bearings. If the bearings are badly worn, damaged or loose, replacing the bearings may buy you some time. But if the bearings are badly worn or damaged, the crankshaft will probably have to be resurfaced - which means a complete engine overhaul or replacing the engine is the vehicle is worth the expense.

ENGINE PINGS OR KNOCKS WHEN ACCELERATING
The cause here may be Spark Knock (Detonation) caused by an inoperative EGR valve, overadvanced ignition timing, engine overheating, carbon buildup in the combustion chambers, or low octane fuel.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jun 21, 2012 | 1990 BMW 3 Series

1 Answer

1990 Pontiac Lemans 1.6l noisy lifter problem


Really, really, sorry to suggest that the head gasket may not have oil passages lined up. Always lay the oil gasket over the new gasket to see if each and every hole is punched out and lines up to the old gasket.

Also, each lifter needs to go back to its original spot. The Cam lobes are worn for that lifter and a mismatch can be possible. A mismatch could mean extra play in a badly worn lifter face mated to a badly worn Cam lobe.

If that is what you did then get new or rebuilt lifters. Check out Compcams.com for a detailed description of each engine scheme. Your engine may have a thrust plate for the lifters and it may be incorrectly installed creating noise.

Feb 12, 2012 | Pontiac LeMans Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2001 Sunfire 2.2L, Car started Noise seems to coming from top of Eng . Lifters is my guess, is there anything that would make similar noise, or that I should be checking, How can I be sure it is lifters?


You make have a bad or sticking lifter, remove the valve cover and have someone tap the key, make sure to disconnect the ignition coil to avoid the engine from starting, as they tap the key you will look for the valve to close, a good way is to watch the one next to it open, when the valve is open then you will know the other is closed as there are two valves per cylinder. with the valve closed grab rocker arm and see if theres a lot of play in the direction it moves if it does then look at rocker and push rod and if those are good then you have a bad lifter. if this engine use an overhead cam then there will be no rocker arms or push rods you will need to look for any worn lobes on cam, a stethiscope would be a good tool. start engine with cover off and listen to each cylinder and pin point noise, this will get a little messy as oil will be splashing out a little but its the best way to locate the noise. poor oil flow would cause this also or a loose timing chain. i would start at the top first and look inside cover. good day.

Jun 15, 2011 | 2001 Pontiac Sunfire

4 Answers

TAPPING IN VALVES


ENGINE CLICKING NOISES
A clicking or tapping noise that gets louder when you rev the engine is probably "tappet" or upper valvetrain noise caused by one of several things: low oil pressure, excessive valve lash, or worn or damaged parts.
First, check the engine dipstick to see if the oil level is low. If low, add oil to bring it back up to the full mark. Is the engine still noisy? Check your oil pressure. A low gauge reading (or oil warning light) would indicate a serious internal engine problem that is preventing normal oil pressure from reaching the upper valvetrain components. The cause might be a worn or damaged oil pump, a clogged oil pump pickup screen or a plugged up oil filter. Using too thick a viscosity of motor oil during cold weather can also slow down the flow of oil to the upper valvetrain, causing noise and wear.
COLLAPSED LIFTER NOISE
Worn, leaky or dirty lifters can also cause valvetrain noise. If oil delivery is restricted to the lifters (plugged oil galley or low oil pressure), the lifters won't "pump up" to take up the normal slack in the valvetrain. A "collapsed" lifter will then allow excessive valve lash and noise.
VALVE LASH NOISE
If you can rule out lubrication-related problems as a cause, the next step would be to remove the valve cover(s) and check valve lash. On older import engines, mechanical lifters require periodic valve lash adjustments (typically every 30,000 miles). Too much space between the tips of the rocker arms and valve stems can make the valvetrain noisy -- and possibly cause accelerated wear of both parts.
To measure (and adjust) valve lash, you need a feeler gauge. The gauge is slid between the tip of the valve stem and rocker arm (or the cam follower or the cam itself on overhead cam engines) when the piston is at top dead center (valve fully closed). Refer to a manual for the specified lash and adjustment procedure. Also, note whether the lash spec is for a hot or cold engine (this makes a big difference!).
On engines with hydraulic lifters, oil pressure pumps up the lifters when the engine is running to maintain zero lash in the valvetrain. This results in quiet operation. So if the rocker arms are clattering, it tells you something is amiss (bad lifter or worn or damaged parts) or the rocker arms need adjusting.

Let me know if you have any other questions.  Thanks for rating my response and for using FixYa!

May 28, 2009 | 1997 Ford Expedition

3 Answers

ENGINE KNOCK 81 GMC 1500 (350)


Sounds like a connecting rod bearing problem. I would have a pro. listen to it.

Jan 07, 2009 | 2002 GMC Safari

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