Question about 1998 Jeep Wrangler

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Do i need a new computer, i cant get fire? ive

Do i need a new computer, i cant get fire? ive changed the ignition mod, coil, crankshaft pos. mod, distributor cap and button

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  • karenleigh11 Feb 08, 2010

    IT IS A 2.5L....KARENLEIGH11@MSN.COM

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  • Master
  • 617 Answers

If you tell me which motor you have the 2.5 or 4.0 i'll try to step you in the right direction with some diagrams to do the testing also an email address to send diagrams to fix problem

Posted on Feb 08, 2010

  • tim mcgrath Feb 08, 2010

    First thing connect a spark tester/spark plug to a spark plug wire crank see if any spark, if non then remove coil wire off distributor cap see if have any fire from coil, also take a test light see if you have any ignition + voltage on the bat+ side of coil with key on.

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2 Answers

97 oldsmobile achieva wont fire changed coil pack spark plugs cam sensor still wont start


Make sure battery has a full charge and battery connections all good.
If it cranks good but won't start, have a helper crank it while you visually check for spark at the spark plugs. If spark everywhere, use a gage and check proper fuel pressure and fuel injector pulse.
If you having a problem with more than one system, I want to check for rpm signal, that usually comes from the crank sensor. Not sure why you replaced cam sensor? I always want to check sensor wiring circuits before replacing anything. Don't replace anything unless your testing points in that direction.

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Starter cranks but no spark


Have you looked at the ignition module, or and ignition switch. Not the key switch} ignition switch.

Sep 11, 2013 | Plymouth Neon Cars & Trucks

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Got fuel to the throttle body but still wont fire,


There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.
The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.

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Sep 21, 2010 | 1988 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

What would cause my car to not send spark to the spark plugs


The first thing is do you know when the last time was that the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires were changed?

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require a firing order diagram any further assistance with testing or diagnostic procedures.




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Jul 29, 2010 | 1995 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

MY 92 OLDS 88 HAS NO SPARK.HAVE. HAVE POWER GOING TO ECM.HAS 3 COILS..FIGURE THEY ALL CANT GO OUT AT SAME TIME.REPLACED CRANKSHAFT POS. SENSOR AND HARMONIC BAL. 8 MONTHS BACK


Sounds like the ignition module or the crank sensor. Even though the crank sensor is fairly new doesn't mean anything. Remove the ignition module and take it to a parts store. Most parts stores can test it.

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1 Answer

2000 caravan. engine will no start. replaced the cam pos sensor, no fix. I don't seem to be getting fire to the coil pack. any tips on testing or repairing?


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2 Answers

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Do a compression test as a malfunctioning valve can cause back fire through the carbie. Since you have changed all the wires double check you have them in the right order because if they are wrong you could get a backfire.

Sep 23, 2009 | 1996 Pontiac Grand Am

1 Answer

Need to know what fires coil 1995 mercury sable both wires to coil have power when key is turned on car cranks no spark from coil new coil what gives the coil extra power to fire


what engine? 3.0L 2 Valve? 4 Valve?
3.4L SHO engine?

The PCM (engine computer) fires the coils, but it is never the cause of a problem. I suspect it is the crankshaft position sensor on the front of the engine by the crank pulley. easy to change.

Crankshaft Position Sensor The crankshaft position sensor (CKP sensor) (6C315) is a variable reluctance sensor triggered by a 36-minus-1 tooth trigger wheel located on the crankshaft pulley and damper. The signal generated from the crankshaft position sensor is called the crankshaft position (CKP) signal, which provides base timing and crankshaft speed (rpm) information to the ignition control module (ICM) (12K072). Base timing is set at 10±2 degrees before top dead center (BTDC) AND IS NOT ADJUSTABLE. The powertrain control module (PCM) (12A650) will use this information with the spark advance information to determine ignition coil (12029) turn on or turn off time.

Sep 15, 2009 | 1995 Mercury Sable

1 Answer

Timing the cams and crank with a belt


  1. Note: Electronic Ignition engine timing is entirely controlled by the PCM. Electronic Ignition engine timing is NOT adjustable. Do not attempt to check base timing. You will receive false readings.

The CKP sensor is used to indicate crankshaft position and speed by sensing a missing tooth on a pulse wheel mounted to the crankshaft. The CMP sensor is used by the COP Integrated EI System to identify top dead center of compression of cylinder 1 to synchronize the firing of the individual coils.
  1. The PCM uses the CKP signal to calculate a spark target and then fires the coil pack(s) to that target shown in Figure 51. The PCM uses the CMP sensor not shown in Figure 51 on COP Integrated EI Systems to identify top dead center of compression of cylinder 1 to synchronize the firing of the individual coils.
  1. The coils and coil packs receive their signal from the PCM to fire at a calculated spark target. Each coil within the pack fires two spark plugs at the same time. The plugs are paired so that as one fires during the compression stroke the other fires during the exhaust stroke. The next time the coil is fired the situation is reversed. The COP system fires only one spark plug per coil and only on the compression stroke.

    The PCM acts as an electronic switch to ground in the coil primary circuit. When the switch is closed, battery positive voltage (B+) applied to the coil primary circuit builds a magnetic field around the primary coil. When the switch opens, the power is interrupted and the primary field collapses inducing the high voltage in the secondary coil windings and the spark plug is fired. A kickback voltage spike occurs when the primary field collapses. The PCM uses this voltage spike to generate an Ignition Diagnostic Monitor (IDM) signal. IDM communicates information by pulsewidth modulation in the PCM.
  1. The PCM processes the CKP signal and uses it to drive the tachometer as the Clean Tach Out (CTO) signal.

2.5L V6

The ignition system consists of an ignition coil, spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The crankshaft position sensor signal is the basis for ignition timing calculations. The alternating voltage signal from the crankshaft position sensor is digitized by a pulse former within the powertrain control module. This digitized signal is then used to position the closing time of the primary circuit of the ignition coil.
Ignition timing is determined by the powertrain control module in response to engine operating conditions based on stored data tables or maps. Once ignition timing has been determined, the powertrain control module interrupts the current to the primary circuit of the ignition coil thus triggering the ignition spark which is supplied to the cylinders through the spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The ignition coils are triggered by the powertrain control module in pairs (cylinders 1 and 5, cylinders 4 and 3 and cylinders 2 and 6) sending one ignition spark to the firing cylinder and one ignition spark to the corresponding cylinder on the exhaust stroke. This ensures that any unburnt fuel residues remaining in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke are re - ignited to provide cleaner exhaust emissions.
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2.0L 4 cynder

The ignition system consists of an ignition coil, spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The crankshaft position sensor signal is the basis for ignition timing calculations. The alternating voltage signal from the crankshaft position sensor is digitized by the powertrain control module. This digitized signal is then used to position the closing time of the primary circuit of the ignition coil.
Ignition angle is determined by the powertrain control module in response to engine operating conditions. Once ignition angle has been determined, the powertrain control module interrupts the current to the primary circuit of the ignition coil thus triggering the ignition spark which is supplied to the cylinders through the spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The ignition coils are triggered by the powertrain control module in pairs (cylinders 1 and 4 and cylinders 3 and 2) sending one ignition spark to the firing cylinder and one ignition spark to the corresponding cylinder on the exhaust stroke. This make sures that any unburnt fuel residues remaining in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke are re - ignited to provide cleaner exhaust emissions.
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Integrated Electronic Ignition System The Integrated Electronic Ignition (EI) System consists of a crankshaft position (CKP) sensor, coil pack(s), connecting wiring, and PCM. The Coil On Plug (COP) Integrated EI System uses a separate coil for each spark plug and each coil is mounted directly onto the plug. The COP Integrated EI System eliminates the need for spark plug wires but does require input from the camshaft position (CMP) sensor.
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Apr 05, 2009 | 1998 Ford Contour

2 Answers

I cant get spark out of the coil pack


cam sensor fires the injectors to synchronise injector pulsing with the spark at the spark plugs.. U need to probably change the crankshaft sensor (around the crank pulley) as the crank sensor is what controls the ignition spark.
hope that does it.
:)

Jan 20, 2009 | 1996 Plymouth Voyager

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