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Electrical wiring starter, coil, runs without key

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This is caused by the starter solenoid on the passenger fender it is sticking and must be replaced.

Posted on Feb 04, 2010

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All of my relays click when power is turned on, but I have no spark or fuel


you attempted to fool the PCM. ever check fuse FIRST>?
all other non engine electrics all working, and dash warning lamps all on key on????????
The ASD, fuel and starter relays, do what? you left that out.
ok battery is good. starter is good. the relay works
but who controls the relay, well that is a chain of things
ok see here
http://www.jeep4x4center.com/knowledge-base/index.htm?utm_source=cj#service

see wiring
see starter page.
8w-11-7
the relay is not tested by jumpering 30 to 87
fuse 2 must be good
the relay good.
then (a voltmeter makes this childs play)
the relay coil is grounded on one side.
then the hot side goes to the clutch switch(m.t) or as the case may be, the A/T PRNDL switch.
my wild guess is car is A/T and if yes
page 8w-21-3 covers this
the key switch sends 12v to starter relay coil
and the PRNDL ground the starter relay coil at d13
ever wiggle the PRNDL by trying park or neutral to crank
the N contacts are virgin still and may allow cranking
if you 12vdc across the coil cranking the relay is BAD.
D11 to D13 (any voltmeter works)

Aug 02, 2014 | 1997 Jeep Wrangler

1 Answer

2000 chev wont start at key


I think the purple wire (or maybe the yellow) from the neutral safety switch goes to the coil side of the starter relay, turning it on so power is sent from there to the starter solenoid. You could check for this signal to the relay with a test light. The key must be held in start while you probe the other two terminals for the relay. If the signal is there, either a bad relay or the coil side of relay is not grounded properly. It is possible that the coil side ground is the neutral safety switch-grounding the relay's coil side only in park or neutral-in which case the nagging light on shifter (between off and run, it only works?) may be telling you the safety switch is the problem.

You may need to look at a wiring diagram, Greg. But the starter relay is the last component in the start circuit before the starter solenoid. From battery to ignition switch to "crank" fuse to neutral safety switch to starter relay to starter solenoid to starter-and back to battery through ground. That is the start circuit. Just that the wiring tying them all together makes it complicated.

Apr 10, 2014 | 2000 Chevrolet Silverado 2500

1 Answer

I have a 1985 Ford F150 That does not run. Will not turnover & no lights. I have had the alternator & battery checked. Both are good. I have replaced the starter selanoid coil, Ignition coil, starter...


There can be a starter lock-out which requires your to foot press the clutch or the brake pedal. But without lights you have a different problem.

Check your fuse block for power. There is a Master link somewhere under the hood and they usually put them close to the Positive side of the battery. The Master link is like a fuse only in wire form. You will also find a heavy wire that supplies power to the fuse block. Often the fusible link and the feed wire to the fuse block are the same wires.

Your Alternator, battery, etc. will test good all day long, but you need power in the fuse block.

Turn the Ignition to ACC and notice if the radio has power or turn the key to run and notice if the Brake lights work when you press the brakes.

If you have power there, then troubleshoot the wire to the starter relay. Most likely when you turn the ignition key(start) you will not have power going to the starter relay like you should. You can also test the coil Positive wire with the key in RUN position.
It should have power.

That's all I have for you.

Oct 14, 2013 | 1985 Ford F150

1 Answer

Starter turns motor but wont start


The 1989 model is wired differently from the 1990 model. So this is for the 89 model only.
You should have about 10 volts to the coil from a ballast resistor which gets power from the key switch. The ground side of the coil is handled by the distributor.
Is the coil getting power from the key switch ?

Jun 25, 2013 | 1989 Dodge Ram 50

1 Answer

Motor start but does not run


Are you saying that the motor runs until you stop cranking it? or just that it truns over while the starter is engaged but doesn't fire at all?
If it's running while cranking but stalls immediately after you release the key and allow it to go into the "Run" position, then the ballast resistor of the ignition system is most likely bad. The idea is that on older cars with electronic ignition, the starter motor caused such a big voltage drop on the cars electrical system that the ignition coil wasn't provided a high enough voltage for proper spark to occur, so they wired them such that the ignition coil could handle the low voltage which was present during the cranking of the starter, but when you stopped cranking and the engine was running normally, suddenly without the voltage drop of the starter, the voltage would be to high and would damage the ignition circuit. Thus a 'ballast resistor' was added to the ignition circuit and it is only in line when the car is in the "run" position. This allows the ignition system the proper voltage to operate whether cranking or running, but sometimes the ballast resistors go bad, causing the engine to run while cranking but causing an open circuit in the ignition system when placed in the "run" position.
Good Luck.

Mar 28, 2011 | 1993 Toyota Corolla

1 Answer

After releasing the ignition key the car will not stay running?no check engine lights on to verify a problem..


It can be short in the ignition switch connection causing this problem.Get the ignition switch and its connection checked and confirmed.Also check the starter connections.May also be a mix up in the starter wiring? Run a temporary wire from the battery to the plus side of the coil then start the car and let go the key. If it keeps running it is either the starter or a wire open or crossed. Also it can be the ignition key switch. Any way you need to check that you have continuity to the coil with the key in the on position. You can use voltmeter to check the continuity.y in the on position. ---------That's it.

Nov 18, 2010 | 2001 Mercury Grand Marquis

1 Answer

How do u hot wire the fan in a 1998 beetle


Hi
Hot-wiring is absolutely illegal without the owner's permission, unless the car is being repossessed. There is a huge risk of electrical shock while hot-wiring, and it may not work in many cases. Some newer model cars have the required components hidden so you can't reach them. Others have "kill switches," which shut down the engine so that it cannot be started, even with the key. Older model cars, like any gas-guzzler from 2004 on down, will work. So will some hybrid and electric cars.
hod 1
Open the hood.
Locate the red coil wire. Both the plug and coil wires are located at the rear of almost all V-8 engines. Four-cylinder engines have them placed on the right side, near the center of the engine. Six-cylinder engines are the opposite: left side, near the center of the engine.
Locate the battery (it's the thing that looks like a battery).
Run a wire from the positive side of the battery (not negative!) to either the positive side of the coil, or the red wire that leads to the coil. This will give power to the dashboard, which is essential if you ever want it to start.
Locate the starter solenoid. it is on the passenger-side fender well, near the battery or on the starter under the steering wheel.
If under the steering wheel, enter the car without setting off any alarms. If it has standard transmission, make sure the car is in neutral and the parking brake is on.
Unlock the steering wheel by taking a flat blade screwdriver and placing it at the top center of the steering column. Push the screwdriver between the wheel and the column, then push the locking pin away from the wheel. Don't worry, you're allowed to be rough here. The locking pin will not break or set off any alarms. The solenoid should be underneath.
You will see a small wire at the top of the solenoid and the positive battery cable below. Cross the two different terminal that they are connected to with a screwdriver or pliers. This will crank the engine, giving you leave to drive. Congratulations.
Method 2
Enter car. Do not break into a car unless you own it and have documentation to prove it. Be aware that forced entry will set an intrusion alarm off if the vehicle is so equipped.
Determine if the steering column and gear selector can be overridden, if so equipped. Serious damage to the shifting mechanism and/or steering column will result in forcing these theft deterrant mechanisms in an attempt to override them.
Look under steering wheel. This may require taking an access cover off. These are usually held in place with concealed clips or #2 Phillips type screws. Remove if needed.
See if there is a clip or wiring harness connector in which you can gain access to the wires behind the ignition.
Look for the two wires that are the same, usually red and strip them and twist them together. One of these will be the primary power supply for the ignition switch, the other will be the connection for the vehicles electrical circuits that are energised when the key is turn to the run position. Connecting these will provide electricity for the ignition components, so the engine is able to run when the starter is turned.
Strip about 1 inch of insulation from this pair of wires, and twist them tightly together. Wrap with electrician's tape if available, and do not allow them to short against metal vehicle components.
Get the ignition wire, brown in many cars, strip it about 1/2 inch, and touch the end of the stripped brown wire with the connected red wires.
Do not twist the brown wire to the reds, just touch the wires until ignition has been achieved.
Rev the engine enough so you don't stall and have to do this process again.
Method 3
This is the most effective method due to the fact that you don't need to bother keeping wires together, raising the hood, or unlocking the steering wheel. If you hotwire it with the wires only, your steering wheel WILL NOT TURN unless you break the steering lock. The "classic screwdriver method" where you put a screwdriver in the lock and twist doesn't work because you can't generate enough torque with your bare hands to make the lock pins break off without breaking the lock off of its mounting structure, thereby rendering the car useless. Use this method instead.
Gather materials: 1 flathead screwdriver with an insulated handle, 1 cordless drill and a small drill bit.
Take it from an expert: So, there is a flap at the end of the keyhole. Position the drill on the keyhole about 2/3 of the way up and drill in about the length of a key. This will destroy your lock pins and make the key switch able to be turned on and off without a key. Every pin has 2 sections, followed by a spring, so drill it more than once, removing the drill each time to allow the bits of the lock inside to fall into place.
Put the screwdriver in the same way you would put your key in, it doesn't have to go in deep because the pins are already broken.
Use it the same way you use your key, just turn it.

Vehicles with a computer chip in the ignition switch cannot be hot wired, the chip enables the ECM to function, and without it, the car will not run.
You risk causing significant damage to your vehicle if you hotwire it.
Never leave the ignition wires twisted together when you finish running the engine. This can burn up the ignition system of the vehicle, and will at least discharge the battery.
*If the ignition wires separate while driving, the engine will instantly die, and you may find yourself without power, steering, or brakes.

Thanks for contacting fixya.com

Oct 09, 2009 | 1998 Volkswagen Beetle

1 Answer

Dodge 318 wiring diagrams


Why not eBay? you may be able to find a "lightly" used harness from an appropriate dodge or Chrysler product that uses your engines?
Try for a Repair manual or electrical repair segment for an appropriate Chrysler product with your engine.
http://www.manualslib.com/

May 01, 2009 | 1980 Chrysler Cordoba

1 Answer

1995 Nissan Maxima won't start, not battery.


You may have bad solenoid, starter/battery/solenoid connections, or gound.

Check voltage at starter solenoid when somebody turns key to start. That is where the starter switch, or relay, sends the voltage to pull in the solenoid coil through small wire. I think the solenoid is on the starter for this car, but it may be separate. Autozone has an excellent web site with car-specific repair guides and instructions. You should see 12V at solenoid every time the key is turned to start.

Check big power cable to starter that runs direct from the battery for tight connections. If you have a separate solenoid, then another big cable runs from it to starter. A loose or bad connection could be the culprit. Also check starter mount bolts. They need to be tight for a good solid electrical ground. You also need good ground from frame to engine. Its a long shot, but sometimes the ground straps come loose or burn. You can easily check this by measuring resistance between engine block and negative battery terminal. It should be zero or darn near zero (less than 1 ohm ?).

The solenoid is really a heavy duty swich to handle the high amp load to the starter. It works by a coil that pulls in the big switch. The coil operates from the starter switch and needs onlyt low current and small wire. If the coil wires burn up or there is a bad connection, it won't work. Hope this helps.

Jan 15, 2009 | 1995 Nissan Maxima

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