Question about 1986 Volkswagen Wagon Camper

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I currently have one battery, but would like to have a starter battery and a service battery set up for camping. therefore, i would like to see original wiring diagrams for a volkswagon transporter 86 t3 1.6d so i can incorporate a second battery and a relay to the original system. any ideas guys?

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Go to alldatadiy,com for the most extensive wiring diagrams I have ever found. I don't work for them, but have used them exclusively for years. Cost is around $25 for a full 12-month subscription. You won't be disappointed.
Let me know if this helped, or if you have any additional information or questions. Feel free to contact me at FixYa.com!

Posted on Feb 03, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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1 Answer

Starter solenoid makes clicking sound but does not engage starter motor


THE STORM?
ok, this is easy , the cause, the cause is called, PHANTOM drain,
or dark current.
the tests are the same on all cars made, even space ships.
http://www.fixkick.com/drain/drain.html

all ways to find it are here.
too bad you didnt use the $150 cash for a battery to buy a tool.
the best tool is only $50 ,
i have the old HOYT amp tool , that i got used for $20 ,
The amp clamp meter excels at finding drains.
it requires, not wire pulling or disconnections to find illegal drains
easy and no danger to you. or the meter.
In fact its childs play to use.
camp it on , bingo, i got X drain.
easy huh?

most cars are below 0.050 amps.
your storm will be around 0.020 amps. or less.

Feb 02, 2014 | 1993 Geo Storm

1 Answer

There is a wire is the starter that needs replace but cant get to needing to know what the name of the wire is called. Its a copper wire thats connected to the starter


if it's a big wire about 1/2' thick, it is the battery cable from the battery positive post to the starter, it provides the heavy current to run the starter.
Another small wire is the 12 volts low current that activates the starter relay which in turn connects the battery cable to the starter motor.
what is starter doing or not doing?
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Starter System The starting system cranks the engine at a speed fast enough to permit the engine to start.
  • Heavy cables, connectors and switches are used in the starting system because of the large current required by the starter motor (11002) while it is cranking the engine.
  • The amount of resistance in the starting circuit must be kept to an absolute minimum to provide maximum current for starter motor operation.
  • A discharged or damaged battery (10653) , loose or corroded connections or partially broken cables will result in slower-than-normal cranking speeds. These concerns may even prevent the starter motor from cranking the engine.
  • In case of starting system difficulty, the operator may have discharged the battery before calling for assistance.
  • A road service procedure is described in this section to aid the service technician in such cases of a discharged battery .
The starting system includes the following:
  • the permanent magnet gear-reduction starter motor with a solenoid-actuated drive
  • the battery
  • a remote control starter switch (part of the ignition switch (11572) )
  • the transmission range (TR) sensor
  • the starter solenoid (11390)
  • heavy circuit wiring
Vehicles equipped with an automatic transmission have a transmission range (TR) sensor in the starter control circuit. This sensor prevents operation of the starter motor unless the transmission range selector lever is in the NEUTRAL or PARK position.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Feb 24, 2010 | 1998 Ford Crown Victoria

1 Answer

When i turn the key it clicks.


1st, have your battery check to make sure it is fully charged.

Next, check the cable connections on the battery to ensure the connections are clean and securely tightened.

If everything is okay, then you most likely have a bad starter solenoid (relay).

A starter solenoid (or starter relay) is the part of an automobile which relays a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion. In many vehicles the solenoid also engages the starter pinion with the ring gear of the engine.

If a starter solenoid receives insufficient power from the battery, it will fail to start the motor, and may produce a rapid clicking or clacking sound. The lack of power can be caused by a low or dead battery, by corroded or loose connections in the battery cable, or by a damaged positive (red) cable from the battery. Any of these problems will result in some, but not enough, power being sent to the solenoid, which means that the solenoid will simply make a clicking sound, rather than setting the starter motor in motion.

To reduce the likelihood of starter solenoid failure, the battery connections should be cleaned and tightened at every oil change. Starter solenoid problems can be diagnosed by a mechanic at a service center by a test of the car's starting, charging and battery systems.

Jan 24, 2010 | 1988 Lincoln Continental

3 Answers

Vehicle will click but not start, tried juming still clicks , only 10000 original milesany suggestions


Assuming your battery is properly charged and has a good connection, it's your starter solenoid (relay) that has failed.

The starter solenoid receives a large electric current from the car battery and a small electric current from the ignition switch. When the ignition switch is turned on, a small electric current is sent to the starter solenoid. This causes the starter solenoid to close a pair of heavy contacts, thus relaying a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion.

If a starter solenoid receives insufficient power from the battery, it will fail to start the motor, and may produce a rapid clicking or clacking sound. The lack of power can be caused by a low or dead battery, by corroded or loose connections in the battery cable, or by a damaged positive (red) cable from the battery. Any of these problems will result in some, but not enough, power being sent to the solenoid, which means that the solenoid will simply make a clicking sound, rather than setting the starter motor in motion.

If these items are all okay, it is likely you need to replace the solenoid.

Jan 10, 2010 | 2004 Ford Econoline

2 Answers

89 cherokee... will not turn over.. the battery has 12.67v so i checked the volage at the starter while trying to start it and got 12.34 so i think that it would be the starter but had it checked out and...


YOu have a voltage at the the starter while trying to start but it not turn over, then there is not enough current to turn the starter. When your solenoid is engaged it make a contact therefore you have a positive voltage at the starter. However the contact inside the solenoid is corroded or carbonized with arcing as it aged, hence limited current could flow preventing a start. Replace the solenoid after checking your battery in good condition will take care of your problem.

Dec 28, 2009 | 1989 Jeep Cherokee

1 Answer

Clicking noise when car starts


The clicking noise is from the solenoid. If the battery is weak, then there is not enough current to make the starter turn. Therefore it is not necessary the starter is a problem. One of my experience is that the contact inside the solenoid can be rusty, corroded so there is not enough current flowing to the starter to make it work. The easy way to find out is to charge up the battery, or to have a jump start to see if the starter turns. If it turns then the problem with the battery. If with a new battery and still needing a jump start then the problem is the solenoid contacts, hence the solenoid needs to be replaced.

Dec 01, 2009 | 1999 Plymouth Voyager

2 Answers

2001 mustang gt,all access. work fully charged


I would suspect the starter solenoid has failed.

A starter solenoid (or starter relay) is the part of an automobile which relays a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion. In many vehicles the solenoid also engages the starter pinion with the ring gear of the engine.

The starter solenoid receives a large electric current from the car battery and a small electric current from the ignition switch. When the ignition switch is turned on, a small electric current is sent to the starter solenoid. This causes the starter solenoid to close a pair of heavy contacts, thus relaying a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion. The starter motor is an electric motor that initiates piston motion in a car's internal combustion engine before it can power itself.

Nov 27, 2009 | 2001 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

1996 Pontiac Sunfire starter wiring - has had the recall service done to add the starter relay. All of the wires were cut to the starter. Here is what I have so far: The battery wire goes to the large...


I am not familiar with the model or the modification. The relay is required to act as a switch to relieve the load on the igniton/starter switch and the stock wiring. The starter switch now switches on the relay instead of operating the starter directly.

The relay contains two parts - the switching contacts and the relay coil or electromagnet that when energised pulls the switching contacts together or apart depending on design.

For use as a starter relay a standard 4-pin relay would be suitable but a 5-pin could be used without detriment leaving one pin unused.

The wire from the ignition/starter switch will be used to energise the relay coil and therefore switch on the current flow to the solenoid. In order to energise it must be part of a circuit and so current must flow through the coil from the ignition/starter switch and then to ground - the thin black wire is traditionally the ground wire for the relay coil, but you will need to check this yourself.

In order to switch a good supply of current to the starter soleniod the relay switching contacts are connected, one to a battery supply and the other one to the soleniod S terminal. The battery supply could be from the battery or from the large stud terminal of the soleniod. If from the battery or other remote place best practice would be to ensure a suitable fuse is also included. While the relay coil ground wire is traditionally thin the battery supply and solenoid wires traditionally are fairly thick.

Sometimes a relay has a helpful circuit imprinted on the cover. Many relays can easily have the cover removed and once you see inside the way it works becomes failty obvious.

I hope this helps...

Apr 01, 2017 | 1996 Pontiac Sunfire

1 Answer

I have a starting problem problem with my 2006 dodge durango. this problem does not happen at all attempts to start but when it happens i get a clicking sound and have toget the truck boost started. i had...


It sounds like your starter solenoid (relay) is failing. The clicking is a classic symptom. It's time to have it replaced.

A starter solenoid (or starter relay) is the part of an automobile which relays a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion .In many vehicles the solenoid also engages the starter pinion with the ring gear of the engine.

The starter solenoid receives a large electric current from the car battery and a small electric current from the ignition switch. When the ignition switch is turned on, a small electric current is sent to the starter solenoid. This causes the starter solenoid to close a pair of heavy contacts, thus relaying a large electric current to the starter motor, which in turn sets the engine in motion. The starter motor is an electric motor that initiates piston motion in a car's internal combustion engine before it can power itself.

Oct 27, 2009 | 2005 Dodge Durango

3 Answers

Just changed the stater, however, it will only click when i turn the key, any suggestions


In order to have the starter work, the solenoid has to close the positive connection to the starter. The solenoid now is corroded inside, when it click to engage the contact inside, but the contact is not good to conduct the current to the starter. Therefore your starter is not turning. Need to replace the solenoid. it is on top of your starter. Here is the image. 5cc5b1b.jpg

Oct 14, 2009 | 2006 Ford F-150

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