Question about 2000 Audi A4

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Just know that engine looses power and takes a long time to build up speed. Hear the noise of the turbo and has just been told that it is the problem and may need a new one. just not able and sure if I can fork out the amount to purchase a new one

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The turbo is common on the tdi engine a fully recondition unit will cost you around £500, a second hand 1 will cost you from between £150-£250, but just be carefull as you will need the numbers from the turbo to match, good luck with this

Posted on Feb 03, 2010

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Don't know much about the turbo models and how they are setup but you might want to check the exhaust catalytic converter out too before you go spending money on turbo.. had to replace one on my 97 A4 2.6 which was seriously effecting power output.. All fine now

Posted on Feb 16, 2010

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Citroen C2 1.4HDI. Head gasket blown, overhauled head, fitted new gasket. Fitted new Turbo as well. Drive the vehicle about 45 km,vehicle looses power and there is a whisteling noise. Any suggestions?


Do you get the whistle on the gear changes or at higher engine speeds? Check all the mounting bolt are tight on the turbo then check all the pipes that are connected to it. A 'whistle' usually suggests an air leak. In basic words turbos are meant to generate increased air pressure into the engine.

Mar 29, 2018 | Citroen Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have just had air mass sensor fitted, swirl pipes removed,and intake manifold de-coked, 250 miles later tubo has failed i e,blades come loose, is there a connection


The cause of damage There are several main causes of turbocharger damage:
Find your cause by checking what was your Turbo's condition.

Oil/lubrication

To work effectively, a turbo needs a constant flow of clean oil, and to keep your turbo in top condition, you need to ensure that you change the oil and oil filter regularly.
This helps to prevent the build up of carbon deposits and contaminants that can cause abrasive damage to the inside of your turbocharger, reducing its efficiency and causing irreparable damage over time. Fully synthetic oil produces the least amount of carbon.

Foreign objects

Sometimes, foreign objects like broken engine components, dust particles, small stones, dirt and leaves can enter your turbocharger, either via the compressor inlet or the turbine inlet.
These can then cause impact damage and abrasion to the compressor wheels and turbine blades, which will start to reduce the efficiency of the turbo. To prevent this happening, you need to ensure that your air filter is serviced regularly, and that you check your turbo for loose connections or debris.

Over-speeding

A turbocharger works by increasing the air pressure in an engine (check out our beginners FAQ for further info).
If there are any leaks, cracks or poor seals between the compressor and the engine, the turbo will have to work much harder than it should have to increase this pressure. This will reduce the efficiency and boost delivered by the turbo.

Other causes

In addition to the causes listed above, excessive exhaust gas temps (EGT's), moisture ingress, wear and tear, fuel intake systems, the wastegate and the exhaust system can also cause damage to your turbocharger.
The warning signs There are several ways that your vehicle will let you know that its turbo is in need of maintenance or repairs:
Check engine warning lights - On most modern cars, the computer diagnostics will pick up turbo faults and the check engine light will come on. Of course, the check engine light doesn't just cover turbo failure, and you will need to do some further checks to see what kind of engine problem you have.
The boost gauge - Some turbocharged vehicles are fitted with a boost gauge, which lets you know how much boost your turbo is producing (you can also fit one to your car if desired). If your boost gauge isn't going up as much as it used to, then there is a good chance your turbo is in need of repair.
Power loss - If you notice that your turbocharged vehicle is accelerating more slowly than usual, or isn't capable of reaching the speeds it once could, this may be a sign that your turbo is failing.
A smoking exhaust - If the turbo housing has cracked, or the internal seals have blown, oil will start to leak into your exhaust system. As this burns off, it produces a distinctive blue/grey smoke, which will probably become more apparent as the engine revs increase just following an idle situation.
A loud whining noise - Often, a failing turbocharger will make a loud, distinctive noise when under boost - a bit like a dentist's drill or police siren if compressor wheel damaged. If you start to hear this noise from your engine, it's definitely time to have it checked out!
The next steps - checking your turbo If you notice any of the warning signs, then get your turbo checked as soon as possible. Your turbocharger isn't going to repair itself, and the longer you leave it, the worse (and more expensive) the problem will get!
At AET, we're always happy to help with the cost-effective diagnosis and repairs on a full range of turbochargers. Alternatively, if you're mechanically minded and aren't afraid of looking under the bonnet, you can check for a range of faults yourself by inspecting the turbo.
Essentially, you are looking for signs of oil, excessive movement, impact damage and contact between the compressor wheel and housing.
Before you start the process, we recommend checking the air filter, exhaust system, breather system and fuel system on your vehicle are all working properly, as these can cause similar symptoms to turbo failure.
Once you've done that, you'll need to remove the air filter to gain access to the turbo. First, examine the exterior, checking for any signs of oil or loose connections.
Then, check the compressor wheel - it should be clean, without any dings, chips, or signs corrosive pitting. Look out for evidence of excessive movement, ensuring that the wheel can't touch the housing, and check to see whether the turbocharger is able to rotate freely.
I you are feeling particularly ambitious; you can also check the exhaust side of the turbo. First, remove the exhaust pipe all the way to the turbo, so you can see the turbine wheel. This should look clean, with no carbon build up, scale or oil along the surface, and the blades should be free from cracks, wear and damage.

I’m happy to assist further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/uttamjeet_2f3adc18600f8ede

Jan 13, 2018 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 3.0L navara turbo diesel and the turbo makes a whining noise but after a while it goes away wot can hhis be ??


turbos make a whining noise at a load like taking off or pulling or full throttle and some turbos after they warm up and are staying at a speed not under a load the whining will still be there but you wont hear it over the road noise some are self oiled some you need to check from time to time

Jul 19, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine light came on and car is over heating. Took it to auto zone and was told it's the fan relay. Its a 2003 PT Cruiser, Turbo. I opened the fuse box under hood. There are 3 spots for relays in there...


Turbo Radiator Fan

The radiator cooling fan is a variable speed electric motor driven fan. The radiator fan assembly includes an electric motor, fan blade, and a support shroud that is attached to the radiator. The radiator fan is serviced as an assembly (fan motor/fan/shroud).

The variable speed radiator fan is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) by way of a Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) signal. The duty cycle ranges from 30% for low speed operation then ramps-up to 100% for high-speed operation. This fan control system provides infinitely variable fan speeds, allowing for improved fan noise, A/C performance, better engine cooling, and additional vehicle power.

To control radiator fan operation, the PCM looks at inputs from:

Engine coolant temperature
A/C pressure transducer
Ambient temperature
Vehicle speed
Transmission oil temperature (automatic transmission only

HENCE CHECK THE PCM

Jun 26, 2011 | 2003 Chrysler PT Cruiser

1 Answer

No power from turbo at all. Rear exhaust seal was loose but I still can't stop exhaust from leaking at this point. Turbo spins well without and signs of being loose. It does not seem to build pressure of...


tubo units get compressor drive power from the exhaust pressure acting on the turbine wheel, not after the turbine wheel so exhaust pipe /flange leaks are non effective
what you problem indicates is a holes in the intake system after the compressor wheel from bad intercooler pipes /hoses loose and or holes in the intercooler
another place of failure is a faulty boost dump valve that is not allowing pressure to build up at all
make sure that the air filter is new as any restriction is a problem
of course you could always take the car to an accredited turbo repair shop and just talk about it and get information as to the possible problems

Sep 13, 2017 | 1995 Dodge Ram 3500

4 Answers

WAS BLOWING BLACK SMOKE AFTER RUNNING GREAT, NOW.....


I wouldn't drive it until you get a scan done to determine what the problem. Diesels are very expensive to fix. I would lean towards the cam shaft sensor has failed but don't quote me on that.

Sep 07, 2009 | 2004 Ford F350

1 Answer

Jeep grand cherokee 2.5 turbo diesel power loss


hi i have bean told it is the number 1 injector with the wire attached you might need it replaced thanks

Aug 16, 2009 | 1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

6.0 powerstroke noise


Not the turbo on it's last legs. Check the hoses that come off of your turbo that go into the intake. Fords are famous for the hose clamps that hold the hoses in place breaking or coming loose and the woosh sound you hear is the compressed air being forced out of the hose somewhere when the turbo spools up. When this occurs you probably don't have quite the pulling torque you should. You will notice quite a drop in performance. Check the hoses or rubber boot connections from your turbo.

Feb 08, 2009 | 2004 Ford F250

3 Answers

Volvo 1998 v70 tdi loss of power and a lot of black smoke lamda fuel light has been on since timming belts replaced been told its the turbo pump runnig at half is this possible and where is the turbo pump...


I don't know about the turbo running at half, but I can give you two ideas.

If it only started after the timing belt was replaced there is a very good chance that the timing is off. The car has very specific instructions due to the variable valve timing.

There is also a chance that there is a hole in one of the turbo hoses. One way to check for a leaking turbo hose is to put the car in reverse and set the parking brake. have someone listen for a large air leak while you power stall the engine. if there is a leak it will make a lot of noise and you can feel for it with your hand, just don't burn yourself.

DO NOT POWERSTALL THE ENGINE MORE THAT THIRTY SECONDS AT A TIME AND NO MORE THAN TWICE. IT WILL GET VERY HOT VERY QUICKLY.

DO NOT SHUT OFF THE ENGINE RIGHT AFTER POWERSTALLING. THERE IS TO MUCH HEAT AND COULD CAUSE DAMAGE. LET THE ENGINE IDLE FOR THREE MINUTES AND IT WILL BE FINE.


I hope this helps

Aug 05, 2008 | 1998 Volvo V70

1 Answer

Dodge ram 3500 clown whistle


sounds like you have a turbo with a bad bearing.
pull of the turbo and rotate it by hand to see if it is hanging up.
Most turbos start to make a different noise when they start to go.
Sometimes dirt can bypass the air filter if is not changed on a regular basis and can cause the turbo to fail or become dirty enough to cause it to spin slower, (the dirt prevents the exhaust to spin the turbo at the right speed and the air passing the fins can whistle), it will cause bearing failure after a while. Also if you have too much soot in your exhaust from too much oil, the exhaust side of the turbo can become too dirty to operate properly

Jul 21, 2008 | 2005 Dodge Ram 3500

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