Question about 2000 Dodge Caravan

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Has no fire to spark plugs ignition coil has no power to it

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Some cars also have a power transistor that can be checked in the same way as the ignition coils, with an OHM meter.
Also, if the speed sensor or sensor wheel is defective the ECU will not allow the car to start. This can be tested with the same OHM meter.
To make sure it is not the coil...the proper terminals must be checked while the car is being turned over.
I would recommend using an LED test light to avoid any possibility of damage to your cars ECU(engine computer unit).
If all seems without power, then have your ECU checked by the dealer.
Good Luck!

Posted on Feb 02, 2010

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Replace the ASD Auto Shutdown) relay. It should be in the fuse box under the hood and should be labeled on the cover.

Posted on Feb 02, 2010

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It mayI have no fire going to the coil or from the coil to the plugs


Have you checked the wiring, the spark @ plug, Power to the coil???

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getting fire from coil but not to plugs - CarGurus

www.cargurus.com > Questions > Dodge > Ram 1500

CarGurusJun 12, 2013 - 2000 dodge ram 1500 4x4 not getting fire changed distributor cap, coil, pickup ignition, rotor, plugs, plug wires 2 answers. ... 1994 dodge 5.9 just shut off and wont start back up there is no spark or fire from coil or plugs. ... 94 dodge van 318 eng will not start new plugs new crank ...

Ignition Coil Troubleshooting: (No) Fire in the Hole

www.secondchancegarage.com/public/coil-troubleshooting.cfm

Jan 27, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Have a 1986 chevy celebrity tec4 an have no fire from coil ive replaced coil checked fuses an have power going to coil still no fire


ignition will trigger if signal from crank sensor, with hei spark plug tester ,read to coil wire and spark plugs wire if spark , depends wich engine
if c3i coil and module the module could be the problems you can check it before replace
hope it helps

Mar 29, 2014 | 1986 Chevrolet Celebrity

1 Answer

Hey there,i have a 1991 msuatng LX with the 2.3L ho engine running an 8 plug head. it sounds like i may have a misfire of some sort or my timing may be out but im not sure how to tell, could someone give...


Insert each wire on the proper terminal of the ignition coil. Ensure that the coil boots are fully seated and both locking tabs are engaged. The terminals are identified on the ignition coils. Install wires as shown in the illustration. The 2.3L firing order is 1-3-4-2 for both ignition coil assemblies.

Distributorless Ignition System In the distributorless ignition system (DIS), all engine timing and spark distribution is handled electronically with no moving parts. This system has fewer parts that require replacement and provides a more accurately timed spark. During basic operation, the EEC-IV determines the ignition timing required by the engine and a DIS module determines which ignition coil to fire.

Components
The distributorless ignition system (DIS) for the 2.3L twin spark plug engine consists of the following components:
  • Crankshaft timing sensor
  • DIS module
  • Two ignition coil packs
  • Spark angle portion of EEC-IV
Crankshaft Timing Sensor
The crankshaft timing sensor is a dual hall effect magnetic switch, which is actuated by the dual vane cup on the crankshaft pulley hub assembly. This sensor generates two separate signals, PIP (profile ignition pick-up) and CID (cylinder identification). The PIP signal provides base timing and RPM information, while the CID signal is used to synchronize the ignition coils. Initial timing (base timing) is set at 10 degrees BTDC and is not adjustable. Ignition Coil Packs
Two ignition coil packs are used for the 2.3L dual plug engine. The two ignition coil packs are triggered by the DIS module and are timed by the EEC-IV. Each coil pack contains two separate ignition coils for a total of four ignition coils. Each ignition coil fires two spark plugs simultaneously, one spark plug on the compression stroke and one on the exhaust stroke. The spark plug fired on the exhaust stroke uses very little of the ignition coils, stored energy, and the majority of the ignition coils, energy is used by the spark plug on the compression stroke. Since these two spark plugs are connected in series, the firing voltage of one spark plug will be negative with respect to ground, while the other will be positive with respect to ground. Refer to thePowertrain Control/Emissions Diagnosis Manual for additional information on spark plug polarity. DIS Module
The main function of the DIS module is to switch between ignition coils and trigger the coils to spark. The DIS ignition module receives the PIP and CID signals from the crankshaft timing sensor, and the SPOUT (spark out) signal from the EEC-IV module. During normal operation, PIP is passed on to the EEC-IV module and provides base timing and RPM information. The CID signal provides the DIS ignition module with the information required to switch between the coils for cylinders 1 and 4 and the coils for cylinders 2 and 3. The SPOUT signal (from the EEC-IV) contains the optimum spark timing and dwell time information. The dwell time is controlled or varied by varying the duty cycle (duration) of the SPOUT signal. This feature is called CCD (computer controlled dwell). Therefore, with the proper inputs of PIP, CID and SPOUT the DIS ignition module turns the ignition coils on and off in the proper sequence for spark control. CID is also sent to the EEC-IV micro-processor to allow for Bank to Bank fuel control. Failure Mode Effects Management
During some DIS system faults, the Failure Mode Effects Management (FMEM) portion of the DIS ignition module will maintain vehicle operation. If the DIS ignition module does not receive the SPOUT input, it will automatically turn the ignition coils on and off using the PIP signal. However, this will result in fixed spark timing (ten degrees BTDC) and a fixed dwell time (no CCD). If the DIS ignition module does not receive the CID input during engine cranking, random coil synchronization will be attempted by the module. Therefore, several start attempts (cycling the ignition from OFF to START) may be required to start the engine. If the DIS module loses CID input while engine is running, the module will remember the proper firing sequence and continue to fire to maintain engine operation. Dual Plug Inhibit
Dual Plug Inhibit (DPI) is a function of the EEC-IV that is only used when the vehicle is being started at temperatures -7° C (20° F) and below. During engine cranking, the EEC-IV will only fire the spark plugs on the right hand side of the engine. When the engine has started, the EEC-IV will send a signal to the DIS module to start normal dual plug operation. Ignition Diagnostic Monitor
The Ignition Diagnostic Monitor (IDM) is a function of the DIS module. The DIS module sends information on system failures to the EEC-IV which stores the information for diagnostic self test. The IDM signal also is used to drive the vehicle instrument tachometer, and test tachometer for system

Nov 19, 2010 | 1991 Ford Mustang

2 Answers

Enging code came up on my 2004 dodge ram 1500 5.7 Hemi. Said ignition coil E was bad and that I had a misfire in cylinder 3. Replaced coil at cylinder 3 but it's still running rough. Is coil E somewhere...


Have you checked the spark plug itself? --- 5.7L Engine To Remove:
NOTE: Note spark plug cable original positions before removing.
dod_ram15_57_ign_coil.gif

dod_ram15_57_ign_coil_loc.gif

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions at the beginning of this section.
  2. Clean the area around the coil with compressed air.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Battery negative cable
    • Throttle body air intake tube and intake box (if necessary)
    • Coil electrical connector by moving slide lock and pressing on release lock
    • Secondary high-voltage cable from coil
    • Mounting bolts
    • Coil from cylinder head opening by twisting
To Install:
  1. Clean area around spark plugs with compressed air.
  2. Apply dielectric grease to inside of boots.
  3. Install or connect the following:
    • Ignition coil to cylinder head opening
    • 2 mounting bolts
      1. Torque to: 106 inch lbs. (12 Nm)
    • Coil electrical connector
    • Cable to coil
    • Throttle body air tube and intake box (if necessary)
    • Battery negative cable
---
Distributorless Ignition System General Information This vehicle uses two different types of ignition systems. The 3.7L, 4.7L, and 5.7L engines do not use a conventional distributor. The 5.9L engine uses a conventional distributor. The ignition system is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) on all engines. Procedures in this section are for the 3.7L, 4.7L, and 5.7L engines; please see the section on Distributor Ignition Systems for procedures for the 5.9L engine.
Distributorless ignition systems (EI) are used on many current engines. This system uses the waste spark method for distributing secondary voltage. In a waste spark system, an individual coil is used to fire one pair of engine cylinders simultaneously. These cylinders are known as companions, since each of their pistons is at TDC at the same time. On a typical V6 engine for example, cylinder 1 is at TDC compression while cylinder 4 is at TDC exhaust. This is also true of cylinders 2 and 5 as well as cylinder 3 and 6.
The cylinder on the compression stroke is known as the event cylinder, while the cylinder on the exhaust stroke is called the waste cylinder. Since secondary resistance is very low in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke, little voltage is required to fire the plug. For this reason, the majority of available voltage is consumed by the cylinder on the compression stroke.
One spark plug is attached to each end of the secondary coil winding via the spark plug wires. This series circuit arrangement causes one of the plugs to fire in a forward direction (center electrode to outer electrode), and the other spark plug to fire in a reverse direction (outer electrode to center electrode). The firing voltage requirements on the waste spark ignition are significantly greater than a traditional ignition system primarily because it takes 30% more energy to fire a plug reverse polarity. When a spark plug is fired backwards, it fires from the outer electrode to the center electrode. This is a high resistance path since the electrons do not flow as easily from a cold, dull surface such as the outer electrode to a hot, sharp surface like the center electrode.
Since the coil and plugs are arranged in a series circuit, a typical plug gap of .050" results in a total gap of .100" for the whole circuit that includes two spark plugs for the companion cylinders. The waste spark can overcome this added resistance by producing high secondary output voltages due to low resistance in the primary winding. Another reason higher secondary ignition voltage is required is cylinder pressure; specifically, the lack of it. Generally, event cylinders require 10 to 12-kV to initiate current flow across the spark plug gap, while only 2 - 3-kV is needed to fire the waste cylinder. Therefore, the air gap in the waste cylinder creates no more resistance than the rotor gap does in a conventional ignition system.
There are two different methods used for coil trigger. One method sends the crankshaft sensor signal directly to the ignition module to activate the coils, while the other sends the crankshaft sensor signal to the PCM and the PCM controls ignition operation either directly or through a separate ignition module.
Waste spark ignition advantages
  • It has fewer components than conventional distributor-type ignition systems.
  • No mechanical adjustments to set ignition timing.
  • No mechanical load (turning the distributor shaft).
  • No unwanted timing variations caused by gear lash or other worn distributor components.
Another advantage of waste spark is longer coil life. To illustrate this point, consider a six-cylinder engine with conventional ignition. At 3000 RPM, the coil must fire 9000 times per minute. This is calculated by dividing the engine speed by 2, since the cam turns at half crank speed, and then multiplying the distributor RPM by the total number of engine cylinders.
In contrast, the coils on a six-cylinder engine with waste spark only work a third as hard. This is because there's a coil for every two cylinders and each coil fires every crankshaft revolution. This means that at 3000 RPM, the coils only fire 3000 times per minute. This allows each coil to operate with less dwell (time that the coil is energized), resulting in less heat buildup and longer life.
Coil Over Plug System The coil over plug system was developed so that spark and spark timing could be better controlled on an individual cylinder basis. Each cylinder has an ignition coil mounted directly above the spark plug on the cylinder head cover. A short suppresser/connector replaces the spark plug wire and links the coil to the plug. There are different methods used for primary triggering. Some manufacturers use a combination coil/module, which means each coil has its own control circuit that is activated by the PCM. Others use remote mounted modules to trigger the coils.
Each individual coil is allowed to saturate while all other cylinders fire. For a V-8 engine, this allows a period of seven firing events for coil saturation, compared to three events for the same V-8 engine with a waste spark system. The coil over plug system also benefits from a minimum amount of energy lost, due to the resistance of spark plug wires.
Coil Near Plug System The coil near plug system also features multiple ignition coils. An ignition coil/module is mounted in proximity of each cylinder. There is a short length of spark plug wire between the coil and the spark plug.
Each ignition coil/module has its own control circuit and is activated sequentially by the PCM. All timing decisions are made by the PCM. This includes both ignition timing and duration of the spark.

Nov 03, 2010 | 2004 Dodge Ram 1500

2 Answers

What does the ignition coil do?


the ignition coil changes low voltage from the battery (12 volts) to high voltage (about 50,000 volts) to fire the spark plugs and ignite the fuel in the engine cylinders and drive the piston down

Oct 21, 2010 | 1999 Chevrolet Malibu

1 Answer

I need the diagram to put the spark plug cables


2003 Chevrolet Malibu 3.1L SFI OHV 6cyl
Spark Plug Wires - Removal & Installation

3.5L Engine
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the Precautions Section.
    NOTE Twist the spark plug boot one-half turn in order to release the boot. Pull on the spark plug boot only. Do not pull on the spark plug wire or the wire could be damaged.
  2. Remove the intake manifold cover, if required.
  3. Disconnect the left side spark plug wires from the spark plugs.
  4. Disconnect the left side spark plug wires from the ignition coil.
  5. Remove the spark plug wire clips from the Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor bracket and the heater inlet and outlet pipe tab.
  6. Remove the spark plug wire assembly.
  7. If replacing only one plug wire, open the retaining clips and remove the appropriate spark plug wire.
  8. Disconnect the right side spark plug wires from the spark plugs.
  9. Disconnect the right side spark plugs from the ignition coils.
  10. Remove the spark plug wire assembly.
  11. If replacing only one plug wire, open the retaining clip and remove the appropriate spark plug wire.
To install:
  1. Install the spark plug wire assembly.
  2. Connect the right side spark plugs to the ignition coils.
  3. Connect the right side spark plug wires to the spark plugs.
  4. If replacing only one plug wire, open the retaining clip and install the appropriate spark plug wire.
  5. Install the spark plug wire assembly.
  6. Connect the left side spark plug wires to the spark plugs.
  7. Connect the left side spark plug wires to the ignition coil.
  8. Install the spark plug wire clips to the MAP sensor bracket and the heater inlet and outlet pipe tab.
  9. If replacing only one plug wire, open the retaining clips and install the appropriate spark plug wire.
  10. Install the intake manifold cover, if required.

Fig. 2.2L Engine Firing Order: 1-3-4-2 Distributorless ignition system
74d742b.jpg


Fig. 3.1L Engine Firing order: 1-2-3-4-5-6 Distributorless ignition system
306b531.jpg


Fig. 3.5L Engine Firing order: 1-2-3-4-5-6 Distributorless ignition system
9313fa7.jpg


Fig. 2.4L Engine Firing order: 1-3-4-2 Distributorless ignition system
2c9af72.jpg


Fig. 3.1L Engine Firing order: 1-2-3-4-5-6 Distributorless ignition system
d929c16.jpg


Fig. 2.2L Engine Firing Order: 1-3-4-2 Distributorless ignition system
f357cd3.jpg

Fig. 3.5L & 3.9L Engines Firing order: 1-2-3-4-5-6 Distributorless ignition system
09e9db9.jpg

I really hope help you with this (remember rated this help) Good luck.

Sep 23, 2009 | 2003 Chevrolet Malibu

1 Answer

Timing the cams and crank with a belt


  1. Note: Electronic Ignition engine timing is entirely controlled by the PCM. Electronic Ignition engine timing is NOT adjustable. Do not attempt to check base timing. You will receive false readings.

The CKP sensor is used to indicate crankshaft position and speed by sensing a missing tooth on a pulse wheel mounted to the crankshaft. The CMP sensor is used by the COP Integrated EI System to identify top dead center of compression of cylinder 1 to synchronize the firing of the individual coils.
  1. The PCM uses the CKP signal to calculate a spark target and then fires the coil pack(s) to that target shown in Figure 51. The PCM uses the CMP sensor not shown in Figure 51 on COP Integrated EI Systems to identify top dead center of compression of cylinder 1 to synchronize the firing of the individual coils.
  1. The coils and coil packs receive their signal from the PCM to fire at a calculated spark target. Each coil within the pack fires two spark plugs at the same time. The plugs are paired so that as one fires during the compression stroke the other fires during the exhaust stroke. The next time the coil is fired the situation is reversed. The COP system fires only one spark plug per coil and only on the compression stroke.

    The PCM acts as an electronic switch to ground in the coil primary circuit. When the switch is closed, battery positive voltage (B+) applied to the coil primary circuit builds a magnetic field around the primary coil. When the switch opens, the power is interrupted and the primary field collapses inducing the high voltage in the secondary coil windings and the spark plug is fired. A kickback voltage spike occurs when the primary field collapses. The PCM uses this voltage spike to generate an Ignition Diagnostic Monitor (IDM) signal. IDM communicates information by pulsewidth modulation in the PCM.
  1. The PCM processes the CKP signal and uses it to drive the tachometer as the Clean Tach Out (CTO) signal.

2.5L V6

The ignition system consists of an ignition coil, spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The crankshaft position sensor signal is the basis for ignition timing calculations. The alternating voltage signal from the crankshaft position sensor is digitized by a pulse former within the powertrain control module. This digitized signal is then used to position the closing time of the primary circuit of the ignition coil.
Ignition timing is determined by the powertrain control module in response to engine operating conditions based on stored data tables or maps. Once ignition timing has been determined, the powertrain control module interrupts the current to the primary circuit of the ignition coil thus triggering the ignition spark which is supplied to the cylinders through the spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The ignition coils are triggered by the powertrain control module in pairs (cylinders 1 and 5, cylinders 4 and 3 and cylinders 2 and 6) sending one ignition spark to the firing cylinder and one ignition spark to the corresponding cylinder on the exhaust stroke. This ensures that any unburnt fuel residues remaining in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke are re - ignited to provide cleaner exhaust emissions.
---------------------------------------------------------------
2.0L 4 cynder

The ignition system consists of an ignition coil, spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The crankshaft position sensor signal is the basis for ignition timing calculations. The alternating voltage signal from the crankshaft position sensor is digitized by the powertrain control module. This digitized signal is then used to position the closing time of the primary circuit of the ignition coil.
Ignition angle is determined by the powertrain control module in response to engine operating conditions. Once ignition angle has been determined, the powertrain control module interrupts the current to the primary circuit of the ignition coil thus triggering the ignition spark which is supplied to the cylinders through the spark plug wires and spark plugs.
The ignition coils are triggered by the powertrain control module in pairs (cylinders 1 and 4 and cylinders 3 and 2) sending one ignition spark to the firing cylinder and one ignition spark to the corresponding cylinder on the exhaust stroke. This make sures that any unburnt fuel residues remaining in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke are re - ignited to provide cleaner exhaust emissions.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Integrated Electronic Ignition System The Integrated Electronic Ignition (EI) System consists of a crankshaft position (CKP) sensor, coil pack(s), connecting wiring, and PCM. The Coil On Plug (COP) Integrated EI System uses a separate coil for each spark plug and each coil is mounted directly onto the plug. The COP Integrated EI System eliminates the need for spark plug wires but does require input from the camshaft position (CMP) sensor.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Apr 05, 2009 | 1998 Ford Contour

2 Answers

1990 Subaru Legacy shorted out the ignition coil. I replaced it and in less than 1 mile,it shorted out the new one.


Subaru engines (including Legacy and engines of many other automobiles, GM, etc.) have returned to so-called wasted spark ignition systems since advent of the electronic distributor-less ignition (having been used historically in early engines with magneto ignitions). With this approach, the ignition systems are less expensive and usually quite reliable. At the same time, however, a shorted spark plug (cracked or carbon clogged, etc.) (or bad ignition spark plug wire) grounds both the ignition spark and the false spark being used. This means that it also grounds the corresponding respective ignition spark of the other 180 degree out of phase cylinder (that uses the same the same coil because the spark current is connected to the spark plugs of two cylinders). Since such a defect allows more current to flow in the spark coil to two plugs when the resistance of the spark plug gap disappears due to a cracked plug, etc, it seems likely to hasten coil burn out if the spark plug/plug wire defect is not corrected before installing the new spark coil.

To explain further, wasted spark means that when a cylinder is ready to fire, it gets a spark to its spark plug while part of the spark (from the same coil and current) as a sort of copy is also sent to another cyclinder at the same time but when the piston in that cylinder is exhausting its ignited gases 180 degrees out of phase from when its spark is needed. When the second cylinder is ready to fire and receives its "spark, the first cyclinder the also receivesa "wasted" spark "copy" of the one needed by the second cylinder. Economy is achieved in manufacture because otherwise electronics would have to turn on and off four different spark coils to distribute four different sparks as needed to the four cylinders. With wasted sparks (which are cheap), because the spark current of one coil is connected (internally in the ignition coil unit) to two cylinders that are in the same position but 180 degrees out of phase in firing, the system can turn on and off two spark coils twice as fast with half the electronics and fire two cylinders that are 180 degrees out of phase. A four cylinder engine thus uses only two coils, a six cylinder engine, three coils, etc., in a wasted spark system.

Jul 27, 2008 | Subaru Legacy Cars & Trucks

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