Question about 2004 Kia Sedona

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Doing my own work

How hard is it to do a power steering flush and a transmission service. I am thinking of doing these things myself.

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Why would you be considering a power steering flush? Some mechanic shop try and ****** you telling you you needed one or why do you want to do it? Servicing the transmission I can understand though but you don't need to do them very often. Problem is when you do them yourself, you take off the pan where the filter is and drain it that way. You are only able to drain about 1/3 to a half of the fluid unless you hook it up to a flush pump like they have at the mechanic shops. It flushes all the fluid and then you can replace with new tranny fluid.

Posted on Feb 01, 2010

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3 Answers

Power steering issues


I'm going to agree with the rack conclusion. Keep in mind I can't see it for myself.
If you take the load off the front wheels, you should be able to turn the steering wheel without effort.
If the effort changes while turning the wheel, the only things affected would be the rack and the column.
If you notice it turns ok with the engine off but not with the engine running, it could be something with the pump or one of the lines, or still something with the rack.

Jul 05, 2012 | 2004 Ford Freestar

1 Answer

A local shop stated that I should change my power steering flush and my auto transmission fluid. I thought that they were the same thing. Are they 2 different fluids? If so, hw ofern should they be...


They are 2 different fluids for sure. As a rule most manufacturer's suggest transmission fluid and the filter should be changed every 60,000 to 100,000 miles. If you do mostly city driving it should be closer to 60,000. City driving is as hard on your transmission as towing trailers.
A power steering flush is a new one to me. I'm not saying that maybe you shouldn't but none of my manuals or experience suggest this is something that needs to be done. I'll admit that I don't have much info on new cars but perhaps a call to a dealer might be in order before you agree to it.
You should consider having the cooling system flushed though. This should be done every couple years because coolant loses its strength over time. They should replace the thermostat when they do it. Be adament about that,make sure it is replaced. If you've never had it flushed a "reverse flush" would be the better one to have done. This flushes against the natural flow of the coolant and will clean a lot more crud out than a normal flush.
Hope this helps.

May 30, 2011 | 2003 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

My mechanic told me I have transmission fluid in my power steering and I should get it flushed. How do I go about flushing it myself?


Easiest is pull one of the hoses and let drain, make sure you pull cap of reservoir off. Then refill with PS fluid. (It happens to the best of us)

Mar 02, 2011 | 2004 Suzuki Forenza

1 Answer

Should my highlander with 70000 miles need automatic transmission fluid flush and a power steering flush?


it never hurts to service the power steering and the transmission, but at 70xxxmi it is not necessary if you check the owners manual it should show a transmission service at 100xxxmi but you will find nothing in the owners manual about the power steering this is a fairly new thing that we are seeing some shops do, i am not sold on weather it needs done at all.

Jan 24, 2011 | 2005 Toyota Highlander

1 Answer

What recommended service is there for the 2005 equinox at 60,000 miles?


Definately do the plugs and wires, air filter, Transmission service, Brake fluid flush, coolant flush, power steering flush and differential (if applicable to your car) if money allows. Priority would be plugs and wires, air filter, trans service and coolant for now And then work your way down.

Nov 27, 2010 | 2005 Chevrolet Equinox

1 Answer

My 2006 mercedes e500 shifts hard from a cold start and gets better when warmed up, but still jerks a bit.


if your car over 65000 km done or after last trans service is it have been done over 65000 km from last trans service as a first thing do the trans service with trans mission flush, trans mission flush is very important, it must get done by right place who have the right flushing machine for Mercedes trans flushing, it's take 12 Ltr transmission oil + transmission oil filter+ oil pan gasket+ pilot bush, you must ask them to replace all those things this trans service is very important for Mercedes 5 speed automatic transmission, please get genuine Mercedes parts only don't use any aftermarket stuff for this particular transmission, and also need to check transmission control unit, the reason is if you do not trans mission service at right time pilot bush starting to oil leaking, that oil flow through wiring to transmission control unit and it's get wet by oil, if it's get wet by oil it's not functioning properly so can play transmission, other thing is if any thing dose not work for solve your problem you must get it to authorized Mercedes transmission technician to check it can be faulty oil pump or torque converter, I would like to note one more important thin regarding this matter, before do any thing please check transmission oil condition its could be mixed with water, if the oil like milky, it's water in oil, if it's like that you must replace the radiator and trans flush as I note above this is very important for your problem, is this information helped you?

Oct 27, 2010 | 2006 Mercedes-Benz E-Class

1 Answer

My power steering pump is not working and i want to replace it myself. how do i do that


1. disconnect the battery.2. Empty the fluid reservoir.3. Remove the serpentine belt.4. Disconnect the high pressure and low pressure lines.5. Remove the power steering pump bolts. The installation is reverse of removal.7. Fill power steering to the full mark on the check stick with Mercon V transmission fluid.That is the recommended fluid for your vehicle.8. Start vehicle and spin the steering wheel all the way left and right to get any air pockets out. Since there is still fluid in the rest of the system,take some time to flush the system out.Low or bad fluid can damage the power steering pump.

Oct 03, 2010 | Ford Escape Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Hard spots in power steering 2004 f-150


Hard to turn steering at times......Not making noisey sound. How can you tell if fluid is down or bad.....?

May 15, 2010 | 2004 Ford F150

1 Answer

My 2002 saturn l200 power steering fluid is brown and groans when turning the wheel.Do i need a new power steering pump?How much do they cost? Can i repair this myself?


No, I don't think you need a new power steering pump. What you should have done first is have the power steering fluid flushed. I want to say that will cost you about 70 bucs, maybe a little less. Unless you are experienced with cars I would not attempt this on your own cause you don't want to damage anything else. If the symptom continues after this then you may need a new pump, but I'm pretty sure a flush will do the trick. Let me know how it turns out. Good Luck!

Jan 12, 2010 | 2002 Saturn L-Series

2 Answers

My power steering pressure hose has a leak.


i pERSONALY WOULD REPLACE IT MYSELF EVEN WITHOUT MY 30yrs Of Experience in this Field. I have Enclosed Instructions for you to use. PLEASE dont Forget to RATE me As MOST folks DONT remember to that is how WE Get our Ratings such as GURU THANK YOU and Good Luck On The Job, Dont PAY a dime If YOU CAN > D I Y

REMOVAL PROCEDURE
  1. Remove the power steering pressure hose (2) from the power steering pump (1).
  2. Raise the vehicle on a hoist. Refer to Vehicle Lifting.
  3. Remove the front exhaust pipe, automatic transmission only. Refer to Intermediate Pipe Replacement in Exhaust System
  4. Remove the power steering pressure hose (1) from the power steering gear (3).
  5. Remove the power steering hose retainer (2).
  6. Remove the power steering pressure hose (1) from the vehicle
    1. Install the power steering pressure hose (1) to the vehicle
    2. Install the power steering hose retainers (2). NOTICE: Refer to Fastener Notice in Service Precautions.
    3. Install the power steering pressure hose (1) to the power steering gear (3). Tighten the fitting to 27 Nm (20 ft. lbs.).
    4. Install the front exhaust pipe, if removed. Refer to Intermediate Pipe Replacement in Exhaust System.
    5. Lower the vehicle.
      1. Install the power steering pressure hose (2) to the power steering pump (1). Tighten the fitting to 27 Nm (20 ft. lbs.).
      2. Bleed the power steering system. Refer to Bleeding Power Steering System in Service and Repair of Steering.

Mar 27, 2009 | 1999 Pontiac Sunfire

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