Question about 2000 Nissan Xterra

3 Answers

I had a caliper go bad. I lost brakes completely. I just replaced calipers, rotors and brake pads. I bled the system and still have no brakes. When hitting brakes hard, it seems to pulse. Pedal still goes to the floor.

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  • calehenderso Jan 31, 2010

    To elaborate a bit... I bled the entire brake system, starting from the back to front. It doesn't matter if the car is on or off, the first pump on the brakes always hits the floor. I can pump it a few times after that and it gets a little bit harder to pump. This, to me, sounds like there is still air in the system. Then I attempted to bleed the master cylinder. I am positive I bled it correctly, but I am not seeing any air bubbles. Is there something else I am missing? Is it possible for something to have gone wrong with the ABS? After hitting the brakes at a higher speed, it sounds like the ABS is pulsing.

  • calehenderso Jan 31, 2010

    To elaborate a bit... I bled the entire brake system, starting from the back to front. It doesn't matter if the car is on or off, the first pump on the brakes always hits the floor. I can pump it a few times after that and it gets a little bit harder to pump. This, to me, sounds like there is still air in the system. Then I attempted to bleed the master cylinder. I am positive I bled it correctly, but I am not seeing any air bubbles. Is there something else I am missing? Is it possible for something to have gone wrong with the ABS? After hitting the brakes at a higher speed, it sounds like the ABS is pulsing.

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Check the slave cylinder that supplise the brakes, also check under dash near pedals to see if is damp as toy could have a leaking master cylinder, the pules you can feel may be the abs sytem i gather what you meen by rotors is the brake disks? (sorry from UK lol) if that is the case then it is your abs, if not, then check your disks, you def have air still in the sytem, try bleading them from the furthest away from the filler, hope this is of some help

Posted on Jan 30, 2010

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Still have air in system,bleed system starting at the rear the one farthest away untill youve done all 4,u must open bleeder valve one full turn while bleeding them,have someone pump pedal a few times,hold pressure while u crack the valve open,when the pedal is on the floor,close the valve,repeat until no more air or bubbles,make sure resivoir has plenty of fluid during the whole bleeding process,if you let it run out you will have to start all over

Posted on Jan 30, 2010

  • oldbetsy1965 Jan 31, 2010

    some nissans have a bleeder valve on the abs,under the hood by the left front fender,you shouldnt have to bleed the master cyclinder unless you run it dry,and then you usually dont have to anyways,I have ran a whole bottle of brake fluid thru the mastercyclinder trying to bleed the abs,some of them you have to unplug the abs"electrical connection" to bleed them cause they have an electric pump that controls a valve in it

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Check the vacuum booster
if it is somewhat hard to push down whne the engine is off and easy to push when running the seal has broken

Posted on Jan 30, 2010

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MNfisherman
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SOURCE: Pistons in both front calipers stay out, both calipers replaced

You may have a leak in the booster or master cylinder. You can put a pressure tester on the system to test for leaks. It does sound like you have an air leak.
You can try to bleed the master cylinder, then slave cylinder, then brake lines.

Posted on Aug 24, 2009

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All new brake shoes on 97 jeep front callibers still sticking


The problem lays with the Caliper itself and/or the brake hose connected to the Caliper.
However if you replaced the pads, did you also replace the Rotors or have them Turned? The old pads wear the rotor. New pads on old rotors that have not been replaced or turned may end with rubbing or stuck brakes.
A simple way to test whether it's one and/or the other:
1. Remove the Caliper from the rotor, remove the pads. Keep for now the caliper attached to the brake hose.
2. Very slowly push on the brake, exposing more of the piston out of the bore. Not all the way. Usually until the rubber dust seal/boot is fully extended.
3. Check the seal/boot for cracks and tears, and if clean or not. Bad seals may prevent the piston from re-seating.
4. Using a c-clamp and pushing straight in: Try repushing the Caliper Piston back into the Caliper Bore (the cup back into the hole). It should go back in realitively easy.
5. If it doesn't go back in easy: Again slowly pump the brake and re-push the pistons back out to full extended seal/boot (but not the piston out of the bore).
6. Detached the brake hose from the caliper.
7. Again using a c-clamp and pushing straight in: Try again to repush the caliper piston back into the bore without the hose attached. If it goes back-in relatively easy - the caliper is okay...it is the brake hose.
8. If the caliper piston does not go back in easily - Replace the caliper.
9. When Installing the new (reman) caliper, remember to bleed the brakes.
TRY EITHER OR #10 OR #11 BELOW:
After the new Caliper is reattached to hose and has been bled:
10. Again push on the brake petal to fully extend the caliper piston fully (rubber seal/boot fully extended) Again do not push the piston out of the bore! Try pushing the piston back into the bore. If it does not re-seat relatively easy: Replace the brake hose.
11. Another method: After replacing the new caliper back on the rotor: Assumng the entire front end (2WD front wheel drive) or entire vehicle (2WD rear wheel drive) or (4WD all the time) is jacked up off the ground
a. Put the lug nuts back on the rotor.
b. Have helper Start the vehicle and place in Drive. Don't step on gas!
c. Have then let off the brake and then engage the brake.
d. When they let off the brake watch to see if the Rotor is turning or not, if rubbing or not. Or if still sticking.
e. With a new caliper, turned or new rotors, and still a problem? It is the brake hose!
12. Replace the brake hose and try again.

Another method but more expensive:
OR Replace the calipers, brake hoses; bleed and test!

If this helped or not; or if you need additional help or have addtional questions let me know on fixya.com!

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1 Answer

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You may have a leak in the booster or master cylinder. You can put a pressure tester on the system to test for leaks. It does sound like you have an air leak.
You can try to bleed the master cylinder, then slave cylinder, then brake lines.

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1 Answer

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1 Answer

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Jan 25, 2009 | 1994 GMC Jimmy

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